2019-2020 Academic Catalog & Student Handbooks 
    
    Jun 13, 2024  
2019-2020 Academic Catalog & Student Handbooks [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


Course descriptions are listed alphabetically by subject prefix. Each course description begins with a subject prefix followed by a three-digit course number and the course title. If a course includes laboratory or other special activities, that information is contained in the course description. Prerequisites and co-requisites are also listed. A prerequisite is a course, experience, or other required preparation that must be completed before the student will be permitted to enroll in the course. A co-requisite is a course, experience, or other preparation that must be completed at the same time that the student is enrolled in the listed course.

Courses numbered 100 to 199 are primarily for freshmen, 200 to 299 for sophomores, 300 to 399 for juniors and seniors, and 400 to 499 for seniors. Courses numbered 500 and above are reserved for graduate students.

Please note, when searching courses by “Code or Number”, an asterisk (*) can be used to return mass results. For instance, a “Code or Number” search of ” 5* ” can be entered, returning all 500 or graduate-level courses.

 

Economics

  
  • EC 202 Principles of Microeconomics


    Credit, three hours.
    The study of the business firm, the household, and consumer behavior, including the price system, price determination and change, production and cost theory, and market structures.
  
  • EC 297 Study in Selected Topics


    Credit, one to six hours.
    Course offered to provide opportunities for competent students to study in areas of interest other than those elsewhere defined. This series is primarily a classroom function, either seminar or lecture, permitting flexibility in course offerings.
  
  • EC 298 Study in Selected Topics


    Credit, one to six hours.
    Course offered to provide opportunities for competent students to study in areas of interest other than those elsewhere defined. This series is primarily a classroom function, either seminar or lecture, permitting flexibility in course offerings.
  
  • EC 301 Intermediate Macroeconomics


    Credit, three hours
    Study and analyis of the forces which determine levels of aggregate output, income, and employment in a developed economy.  Study and analysis of the attempts, through government fiscal policy and monetary policy, to control these forces, and some possible alternatives. Prerequisite(s): EC 201   and EC 202  
  
  • EC 302 Intermediate Microeconomics


    Credit, three hours.
    Study and analysis of the price system, production and cost theory, and the forces which determine the market structures, the allocation of resources, and income distribution in the American economy.  Prerequisite(s): EC 201  and EC 202  
  
  • EC 303 Money and Banking


    Credit, three hours.
    A study of the monetary, credit, and depository institutions in the American economy, with emphasis on the commercial banks, the Federal Reserve System, and the impact of money and credit flow on business decisions and aggregate economic activity. Cross-listed as: FI 303 . Prerequisite(s): EC 201 .
  
  • EC 306 Labor Economics


    Credit, three hours.
    A study of the structure and functioning of labor markets, including the determinants of labor supply and labor demand, the economics of wage differentials, the labor market effects of such government policies as minimum wage laws, and the economic impact of labor unions.  Some attention is also given to collective bargaining and causes of unemployment. Prerequisite(s): EC 201  and EC 202 , or by permission of the instructor.
  
  • EC 309 Economic Development


    Credit, three hours.
    A study of the theories and polices of economic development, along with the factors that underlie economic development.  Emphasis is placed on the less-developed or Third-World countries and the obstacles to economic development therein. Prerequisite(s): EC 201  and EC 202 , or by permission of the instructor.
  
  • EC 331 Internships


    Credit, three hours.
    Qualified students who have satisfactorily completed BA 151  and six advanced semester hours in AC, BA, EC, FI, MGT, or MKT may be placed in internships for at least 135 hours of supervised, professional experience. Grades are either Pass or Fail.
  
  • EC 425 Export-Import Practices


    Credit, three hours.
    Fundamentals  of international trade, including the mechanics of makin overseas contacts, promoting products abroad, contracts and terms of sales, payments and the documentation and physical movement of goods. Cross-listed as: BA 425 Prerequisite(s): EC 201  and EC 202  or permission of the instructor.
  
  • EC 431 Independent Study


    Maximum credit, eight hours.
    A student with advanced standing may pursue an independent study or research project in the major area, with the approval of the advisor, instructor, and dean of the School of Business. Prerequisite(s): Completion of at least eighteen semester hours with a 3.00 GPA or higher in the major. (See independent study contract for requirements and details.)
  
  • EC 432 Independent Study


    Maximum credit, eight hours.
    A student with advanced standing may pursue an independent study or research project in the major area, with the approval of the advisor, instructor, and dean of the School of Business. Prerequisite(s): Completion of at least eighteen semester hours with a 3.00 GPA or higher in the major. (See independent study contract for requirements and details.)
  
  • EC 497 Study in Selected Topics


    Credit, one to six hours.
    Courses offered to provide competent students opportunities for study in areas of interest other than those elsewhere defined. This series is primarily a classroom function, either seminar or lecture, permitting flexibility in course offerings.
  
  • EC 498 Study in Selected Topics


    Credit, one to six hours.
    Courses offered to provide competent students opportunities for study in areas of interest other than those elsewhere defined. This series is primarily a classroom function, either seminar or lecture, permitting flexibility in course offerings.
  
  • EC 502 Managerial Economics


    Credit, three hours.
    Provides an analysis of the application of microeconomic theory to the decision-making process within a given firm. The major emphasis is on the optimal allocation of the firm’s resources under perfect and imperfect market structures in product and factor markets. Prerequisite(s): EC 201  and EC 202  or equivalent.

Elementary Education

  
  • EE 512 Teaching Mathematics in the Elementary School


    Credit, three hours.
    Emphasizes methods of presenting mathematical concepts and skills to elementary school children. Emphasis is placed on thinking about and discovering mathematical concepts. Opportunities are provided for developing multi-level materials appropriate for elementary children. Directed field experiences required. Prerequisite(s): TE 525  
  
  • EE 513 Language Arts in the Elementary School


    Credit, three hours.
    Provides an analysis of methodologies and instructional techniques and considers application of methods to the skills and content areas of language arts. Directed field experiences required. Prerequisite(s): TE 525  
  
  • EE 514 Applied Science for Early Childhood and Elementary Education


    Credit, three hours.
    Designed to equip students with skills necessary to review and use current literature in the science field to identify effective teaching techniques to develop, teach, and evaluate a variety of hands-on learning activities related to early childhood and elementary science concepts. Emphasis will be placed on the role of developmental learning theory along with integrating reading and language arts into the content area of science. Prerequisite(s): TE 525  
  
  • EE 515 The Politics and Ethics of Education


    Credit, three hours.
    This course is designed to assist educators to become knowledgeable, effective, and responsible actors within the web of political and ethical relationships and responsibilities.
  
  • EE 516 Diagnostic and Prescriptive Teaching


    Credit, three hours.
    Provides an advanced course in designing individual remedial procedures. Emphasis is placed on individual and group techniques to correct reading deficiencies and to evaluate requirements for continuing reading assistance. Field experiences involving students in reading remediation required. Prerequisite(s): EE 522   and TE 525  for Alternative students.
  
  • EE 521 Reading in the Content Areas


    Credit, three hours.
    Provides assessment and instructional strategies for the teaching of reading in content areas. Techniques for teaching word attack, comprehension, study, and rate of reading skills are emphasized. Directed field experiences required. Prerequisite(s): TE 525  
  
  • EE 522 Developmental Reading


    Credit, three hours.
    Analyzes basic skills in readiness, word recognition, comprehension, and study skills. Examines different approaches to the teaching of reading. Directed experiences required.  A test fee will be added as a Course Fee to billing. Prerequisite(s): TE 525  
  
  • EE 535 Literature for Young Readers


    Credit, three hours.
    Provides semi-independent study and research in literature for children and youth, characteristics, good literature for children, illustrations, and place of children’s literature in school. Directed field experiences required. Prerequisite(s): TE 525   or equivalent for traditional master’s program
  
  • EE 540 Classroom Management


    Credit, three hours.
    Provides a study of current theory, research, and practice in psychology, sociology, leadership, and human behavior as related to school age students and the role of the teacher and the subsequent relationship of the teacher and the total community. Emphasis is placed on effective management of time, resources, and behavior. Directed field experiences required. Prerequisite(s): TE 525  
  
  • EE 560 Readings in Selected Areas of Education


    Credit, three hours.
    Provides an opportunity for the student to work closely with a faculty member in selecting articles and other appropriate readings in mutually agreed upon area(s) of need. Written reports will be required. Students must have this course approved by the dean of the School of Education.
  
  • EE 599 Practicum in Elementary Education


    Credit, three hours.
    Provides an in-depth study of various curriculum areas through research reports, problem analysis, and individual evaluations of promising practices. Each seminar participant will concentrate on one curricular area. This course may not be taken by alternative master’s students.

English

  
  • EN 100 Basic English Skills


    Credit, three hours.
    A course in the fundamentals of English designed for students who need to increase their proficiency in English composition and mechanics.
  
  • EN 101 Effective English


    Credit, three hours.
    A course in composition and college level reading designed to provide training in critical thinking, reading skills, and analytical writing. Includes a study of research methods and the writing of documented papers in the context of an introduction to classical epic poetry, and selections of lyric poetry and prose writing. (WI)
  
  • EN 102 Effective English


    Credit, three hours.
    A course in composition and college level reading designed to provide training in critical thinking, reading skills, and analytical writing. Includes a study of research methods and the writing of documented papers in the context of an introduction to classical and Christian epic poetry, and selections of lyric poetry and prose writing.
  
  • EN 103 Developmental Composition


    Credit, three hours.
    A course in writing designed to develop and enhance composition skills. Includes a review of grammar and punctuation.
  
  • EN 111H Honors English


    Credit, three hours.
    An advanced course in writing designed to provide training in critical thinking, reading skills, and analytical writing in the context of work from ancient Western Civilization. Includes a study of research methods and the writing of documented papers. Students should already have a basic mastery of mechanics and be prepared for more advanced readings, challenging assignments, and rigorous standards. (WI)
  
  • EN 112H Honors English


    Credit, three hours.
    An advanced course in writing designed to provide training in critical thinking, reading skills, and analytical writing in the context of works from the medieval through the early modern period of Western civilization. Includes a study of research methods and the writing of documented papers. Students should already have a basic mastery of mechanics and be prepared for more advanced readings, challenging assignments, and rigorous standards.
  
  • EN 201 The Literary Tradition


    Credit, three hours.
    An introduction to key literary texts from ancient times to the Renaissance. A continuation of the emphasis on writing from EN 101 , EN 102 . Prerequisite(s): EN 101 , EN 102 .
  
  • EN 202 The Literary Tradition


    Credit, three hours.
    An introduction to key literary texts from Enlightenment to the present. A continuation of the emphasis on writing from EN 101 , EN 102 . Prerequisite(s): EN 101 , EN 102 .
  
  • EN 211H Honors Literature


    Credit, three hours.
    An introduction to key literary texts from the Enlightenment to the end of the nineteenth century. Continued emphasis on writing from EN 111H  and EN 112H . Students should be prepared for extensive reading and advanced assignments, including individual projects and supplemental reading. (WI)
  
  • EN 212H Honors Literature


    Credit, three hours.
    An introduction to key literary texts from the twentieth century to the present. Continued emphasis on writing from EN 111H  and EN 112H . Students should be prepared for extensive reading and advanced assignments, including individual projects and supplemental reading.
  
  • EN 215 Literature of the Ancient World


    Credit, three hours.
    A survey of classical literary works written in Greek and Latin, and translated into English.  Though the survey may include the works of Homer and Virgil, the readings will extend beyond those authors to expand on the traditional EN 101 and 102 sequence.  While broad in its reading selections, the course will explore the political, social, and artistic world of ancient Greece and Rome through its greatest literature.  Prerequisite(s): EN 101  and EN 102 
  
  • EN 221 Introduction to British Literature I


    Credit, three hours.
    A survey of major authors and texts from the British Isles, from the Anglo-Saxon period through the seventeenth century. Prerequisite(s): EN 101 , and EN 102 .
  
  • EN 222 Introduction to British Literature II


    Credit, three hours.
    A survey of major authors and texts from the British Isles, from the eighteenth century to the present. Prerequisite(s): EN 101  and EN 102 .
  
  • EN 230 Introduction to American Literature


    Credit, three hours.
    A survey of the major writers from colonial times to the present. Prerequisite(s): EN 101  and EN 102 . Open to English majors and minors, or by permission of instructor. (WI)
  
  • EN 297 Study in Selected Topics


    Credit, one to six hours.
    Courses offered to provide opportunities for students to study in areas of interest other than those elsewhere defined. This series is primarily a classroom function, either seminar or lecture, permitting flexibility in course offerings. Prerequisite(s): EN 101 , EN 102 .
  
  • EN 298 Study in Selected Topics


    Credit, one to six hours.
    Courses offered to provide opportunities for students to study in areas of interest other than those elsewhere defined. This series is primarily a classroom function, either seminar or lecture, permitting flexibility in course offerings. Prerequisite(s): EN 101 , EN 102 .
  
  • EN 301 The Novel


    Credit, three hours.
    A study in the nature of narrative and critical approaches necessary for reading novels. May include British or American novels or novels in translation. Will include a significant creative writing component. Prerequisite(s): EN 101 , EN 102 , and three additional hours in literature above the freshman level. (WI)
  
  • EN 302 Lyric Poetry


    Credit, three hours.
    A study of the nature of lyric poetry and critical approaches necessary for its reading and writing. The course will include a substantial creative writing component. Prerequisite(s): EN 101 , EN 102  and three additional hours in literature above the freshman level.
  
  • EN 305 Social and Personal Responsibility Through Literature


    Credit, three hours.
    A study of the nature and history of democracy, of its strengths and weaknesses, and of the nature and origin of tyranny in political regimes as seen in a variety of literary works.
  
  • EN 306 Introduction to Creative Non-fiction


    Credit, three hours.
    An introduction to the practical skills required for writing creative non-fiction. Creative non-fiction, in the context of this course, describes writing as diverse as long-form essays, investigative journalism, and memoire. Students will read texts across these genres and produce their own writing. As will all courses in the Creative Writing Minor, the workshop will be central. Students will read and critique one another’s work, and have their own work critiqued.
  
  • EN 307 Introduction to Writing for Film and Television


    Credit, three hours.
    An introduction to the practical skills required for writing for film and television. This course will introduce (or reintroduce) students to a series of iconic films and television shows. They will learn to watch and analyze film and television as literature. For the final project students can choose between writing the first act of a feature length film; a complete script for a short film; or a pilot for a television show. Drafts of these projects will be workshopped and critiqued.
  
  • EN 310 Drama Practicum


    Credit, one hour.
    This practicum course gives students experience in theater production.  Students participate in a university - sponsored theater production or, with premission of the supervisor, in an off-campus production (e.g. community theater or independent theater production).  Participation may include any aspect of the production, including but not limited to directing, acting, stage management, costuming, set design, production, or publicity.
  
  • EN 331 Advanced Composition


    Credit, three hours.
    An advanced study of various writing techniques and grammatical principles. The course will include practical applications of writing, editing, and advanced grammar in academic composition, as well as the mass media. It will include assignments that consider the Christian ethic and its application to the issues of current interest, as well as how the Christian ethic informs the writer who is concerned with the effects of the printed word on his or her society. Cross-listed as: TE 331 . Prerequisite(s): EN 101 , EN 102  and three additional semester hours in English above the freshman level.
  
  • EN 333 Christianity and Literature


    Credit, three hours.
    A study of the relationship of literature and Christian faith. The course may focus on a single author or group of authors (such as the Inklings), a period, or a theme. Prerequisite(s): EN 101  and EN 102  and three additional hours in literature above the freshman level.
  
  • EN 350 Introduction to Writing Short Stories


    Credit, three hours.
    An introduction to the practical skills required for writing short fiction. This course will equip students with the skills necessary to read and critique short fiction from a creative writer’s perspective; and introduce them to the fiction writing workshop. Assignments will include reading and critiquing the work of established writers; critiquing the fiction of peers; and writing short fiction. Students will have the opportunity to workshop several short stories. (WI)
  
  • EN 400 Critical Theory


    Credit, three hours.
    A historical survey of critical and aesthetic theory from Plato to the present, with some attention to current trends. Prerequisite(s): Completion of core requirements in English.
  
  • EN 405 Shakespeare


    Credit, three hours.
    A study of selected Shakespearean comedies, histories, and tragedies. The course will include assignments that consider the Christian ethic and its application to the issues of current interest, as well as how the Christian ethic informs the reader who is concerned with the effects of the printed word on his or her society. Prerequisite(s): EN 101 , EN 102  and three additional semester hours in English above the freshman level. (WI)
  
  • EN 410 Medieval Literature and Culture


    Credit, three hours.
    A study of selected texts from the Anglo-Saxon and Medieval periods. The course may focus on the period as a whole, a genre, a single author (e.g. Chaucer), or a specific movement or theme. Texts may be read in Middle English, as well as in translation. Prerequisite(s): EN 101 , EN 102 , and three additional hours in literature above the freshman level.
  
  • EN 414 Seventeenth-Century British Literature


    Credit, three hours.
    A study of seventeenth-century literature from the British Isles. The course may focus on the period as a whole, a genre, a single author (e.g. Milton), or a specific movement (e.g. Metaphysical poetry) Prerequisite(s): EN 101 , EN 102 , and three additional hours in literature above the freshman level.
  
  • EN 420 Literature of The British Enlightenment


    Credit, three hours.
    A study of the literature of the eighteenth century in its Enlightenment context. The course may focus on the period as a whole, a genre, a single author, or a specific movement. Prerequisite(s): EN 101 , EN 102 , and three additional hours in literature above the freshman level.
  
  • EN 422 Victorian Literature and Culture


    Credit, three hours.
    A study of British literature in its cultural context from the 1830’s to the 1890’s. The course may focus on the period as a whole, a genre, a single author, or a specific movement. Prerequisite(s): EN 101 , EN 102 , and three additional hours in literature above the freshman level.
  
  • EN 424 British Romanticism


    Credit, three hours.
    A study of the poetry and prose of major Romantic authors (including Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, and Keats) and of Romanticism’s place in the history of British literature, philosophy, and aesthetics. Prerequisite(s): EN 101 , EN 102 , and three additional hours in literature above the freshman level.
  
  • EN 426 Professional Internship in English


    Credit, one to three hours.
    Supervised participation in professional literary, writing, and/or publishing work. Students will complete required contact hours producing a written publication, tutoring, teaching, writing, or doing other professional work related to careers in English, writing, and literature. Grades are either Pass or Fail.
  
  • EN 431 Independent Study


    Maximum credit, eight hours.
    Courses offered to provide opportunities for students to pursue an independent study or research project in the major area, with the approval of the advisor, instructor, and Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. Prerequisite(s): At least eighteen semester hours with 3.00 GPA or higher in the major. (See independent study contract for requirements and details.)
  
  • EN 434 Twentieth-Century British Literature


    Credit, three hours.
    A study of selected twentieth-century literature from the British Isles. The course may focus on the period as a whole, a genre, a single author, or a specific movement or region. Prerequisite(s): EN 101 , EN 102 , and three additional hours in literature above the freshman level.
  
  • EN 440 Early American Literature


    Credit, three hours.
    A study of American literature from exploration through the Federalist period. The course may focus on a specific region, genre, period, major author, or theme. Prerequisite(s): EN 101  and EN 102  and three additional hours in literature above the freshman level.
  
  • EN 441 Creative Writing


    Credit, three hours.
    A course centered around the study of writing techniques and the writing and critique of fiction and poetry. Prerequisite(s): Completion of core requirements in English.
  
  • EN 444 American Romanticism


    Credit, three hours.
    The course will examine the development of Romantic literature in the United States through the Civil War. Particular attention will be paid to the major writers of the American Renaissance. Prerequisite(s): EN 101 , EN 102 , and three additional hours in literature above the freshman level.
  
  • EN 451 American Realism and Naturalism


    Credit, three hours.
    An examination of major figures and currents in American Realism and Naturalism in the context of the social, economic, and intellectual expansion and turmoil at the turn of the 20th century. Prerequisite(s): EN 101 , EN 102 , and three additional hours in literature above the freshman level.
  
  • EN 460 Twentieth-Century American Literature


    Credit, three hours.
    A study of selected twentieth-century literature in the United States. The course may focus on a genre, a single author, or a specific movement or period. Prerequisite(s): EN 101 , EN 102 , and three additional hours in literature above the freshman level.
  
  • EN 461 Southern Literature


    Credit, three hours.
    A survey of the literature of the American South emphasizing the writing of the 20th century Southern Renascence. The course will include consideration of alternative traditions such as the literature of the Creole South and Appalachia. Prerequisite(s): EN 101 , EN 102 , and three additional hours in literature above the freshman level.
  
  • EN 471 African American Literature


    Credit, three hours.
    A survey of the major figures and currents in African American writing from the colonial period to the present. Prerequisite(s): EN 101 , EN 102 , and three additional hours in literature above the freshman level.
  
  • EN 478 Literature in Translation


    Credit, three hours.
    A study of literary works written originally in a language other than English, but translated into English. The study may focus on a period, region, nation, or theme. Prerequisite(s): EN 101 , EN 102 , and three additional hours in literature above the freshman level.
  
  • EN 488 Interdisciplinary Seminar


    Credit, three hours.
    Study of a selected theme or topic designed to synthesize and reveal the coherence of the undergraduate curriculum. Prerequisite(s): Normally limited to seniors with the approval of the course director.
  
  • EN 492 Final Project and Professionalization


    Credit, three hours.
    In order to be awarded the minor in creative writing, each student must complete a substantial creative project under the supervision of faculty, and demonstrate a commitment towards professional development. This element of the course will be highly personalized, and must be worked out with faculty. For example, a student who started working on a novel in “Intro to novel writing,” may wish to revise, edit and complete the manuscript. For the professionalization component, the same student might maintain a regular blog, explore profitable self-publishing ventures, or demonstrate a serious commitment towards finding a literary agent. Another student may choose to complete a series of short stories, while also organizing a reading festival in Mobile. Internships in publishing houses, or with newspapers or magazines would also count towards the professionalization requirement. Prerequisite(s): 15 hours in Creative Writing Minor Courses, i.e. all other Creative Writing Minor Courses
  
  • EN 496 Senior Practicum


    Credit, three to nine hours.
    To complete the course, students will produce a literary arts journal. Responsibilities include all aspects of production, such as soliciting and editing submissions, securing funding, overseeing layout and design, and managing production and distribution. Alternately, students may receive credit by completing an internship of at least 135 hours. The internship should include experience in writing, editing, graphic design, or other media production. Prerequisite(s): COM 320 Media Writing  and AR 226 Introduction to Graphic Design .
  
  • EN 497 Study in Selected Topics


    Credit, one to six hours.
    Courses offered to provide opportunities for students to study in areas of interest other than those elsewhere defined. This series is primarily a classroom function, either seminar or lecture, permitting flexibility in course offerings.
  
  • EN 498 Study in Selected Topics


    Credit, three hours.
    Courses offered to provide opportunities for students to study in areas of interest other than those elsewhere defined. This series is primarily a classroom function, either seminar or lecture, permitting flexibility in course offerings.
  
  • EN 498H Honors Thesis


    Credit, three hours.
    Research, writing and defense of an honors thesis according to program guidelines.  Prerequisite(s): Completion of lower division honors requirements and permission of the director of the honors program.

Educational Psychology

  
  • TE 501 Advanced Educational Psychology


    Credit, three hours.
    Consists of a comprehensive survey of the various applications of psychology to student learning. Topics studied include dynamics of human behavior, student-teacher interaction, theories and methods of instruction, learning theory, motivation, classroom management, individual differences, and the evaluative process. Prerequisite(s): TE 525  

Environmental Science

  
  • ES 101 Introduction to Geology


    Credit, four hours.
    A study of the nature and composition of the earth and of the chemical and physical forces that affect the earth. This course satisfies one of the laboratory science requirements of the core curriculum. Three hours lecture, Two hours laboratory.
  
  • ES 103 Basic Meteorology


    Credit, four hours.
    A study of patterns of weather on a local and worldwide scale. The survey of weather patterns stresses the causative factors and the effects of weather changes. Several types of weather phenomena are discussed. This course satisfies one of the laboratory science requirements of the core curriculum. Three hours lecture, Two hours laboratory.
  
  • ES 105 Environmental Science


    Credit, four hours.
    A study of ecological relationships between organisms. The course includes topics such as air pollution, water pollution, and other current environmental problems approached from a biological perspective. This course satisfies one of the laboratory science requirements of the core curriculum. Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory.
  
  • ES 107 Natural Disasters and Hazards


    Credit, four hours.
    A study of earth processes as hazards, disasters, and catastrophes. Topics include earthquakes, volcanism, flood, hurricanes, tornadoes, climate change, wildfires, and mass extinctions. three hours lecture, two hours laboratory.
  
  • ES 297 Study in Selected Topics


    Credit, one to six hours.
    Courses offered to provide opportunities for students to study in areas of interest other than those elsewhere defined. This series is primarily a classroom function, either seminar or lecture, permitting flexibility in course offerings.
  
  • ES 298 Study in Selected Topics


    Credit, one to six hours.
    Courses offered to provide opportunities for students to study in areas of interest other than those elsewhere defined. This series is primarily a classroom function, either seminar or lecture, permitting flexibility in course offerings.

Finance

  
  • FI 297 Study in Selected Topics


    Credit, one to six hours.
    Course offered to provide opportunities for competent students to study in areas of interest other than those elsewhere defined. This series is primarily a classroom function, either seminar or lecture, permitting flexibility in course offerings.
  
  • FI 298 Study in Selected Topics


    Credit, one to six hours.
    Course offered to provide opportunities for competent students to study in areas of interest other than those elsewhere defined. This series is primarily a classroom function, either seminar or lecture, permitting flexibility in course offerings.
  
  • FI 300 Personal Finance


    Credit, three hours.
    The course is intended to foster the development of financial maturity and to do so within a stewardship emphasis. Topics cover career planning, giving, taxation, spending and saving, retirement planning, investments, estate planning, insurance, and using credit.
  
  • FI 303 Money and Banking


    Credit, three hours.
    A study of the monetary, credit, and depository institutions in the American economy, with emphasis on the commercial banks, the Federal Reserve System, and the impact of money and credit flow on business decisions and aggregate economic activity. Cross-listed as: EC 303 . Prerequisite(s): EC 201 .
  
  • FI 330 Principles of Finance


    Credit, three hours.
    Introduction to the concepts and techniques of financial management within a business organization. This course includes an overview of the environment of financial management, valuation principles, capital budgeting, risk, cost of capital, long-term financing, and working capital management. Prerequisite(s): AC 241  and MA 110 .
  
  • FI 331 Internships


    Credit, three hours.
    Qualified students who have satisfactorily completed FI 330  and FI 361  may be placed in internships for at least 135 hours of supervised professional experience. Grades are either Pass or Fail.
  
  • FI 332 Internship


    Credit, three hours.
    Qualified students who have satisfactorily completed FI 330  and FI 361  may be placed in internships for at least 135 hours of supervised professional experience. Grades are either Pass or Fail.
  
  • FI 361 Financial Management


    Credit, three hours.
    The course expands the study of basic financial management (FI 330 ) to include more in-depth examination of financial management fundamentals and additional special topics. There is an emphasis on the application of analytical tools and theory to financial decision-making in the firm through case studies using electronic spreadsheet analysis and/or computer simulation programs. Prerequisite(s): FI 330 , CIS 101 .
  
  • FI 431 Independent Study


    Maximum credit, eight hours.
    A student with advanced standing may pursue an independent study or research project in the major area, with the approval of the advisor, instructor, and dean of the School of Business. Prerequisite(s): Completion of at least eighteen semester hours with a 3.00 GPA or better in the major. (See independent study contract for requirements and details.)
  
  • FI 432 Independent Study


    Maximum credit, eight hours.
    A student with advanced standing may pursue an independent study or research project in the major area, with the approval of the advisor, instructor, and dean of the School of Business. Prerequisite(s): Completion of at least eighteen semester hours with a 3.00 GPA or better in the major. (See independent study contract for requirements and details.)
  
  • FI 435 Investments


    Credit, three hours.
    The study of the markets, especially the secondary markets, for debt and equity securities and other investments. Includes stocks, bonds, options, warrants, commodities, collectibles, and real estate. Prerequisite(s): FI 330 . (WI)
  
  • FI 497 Study in Selected Topics


    Credit, one to six hours.
    Courses offered to provide competent students opportunities for study in areas of interest other than those elsewhere defined. This series is primarily a classroom function, either seminar or lecture, permitting flexibility in course offerings.
  
  • FI 498 Study in Selected Topics


    Credit, one to six hours.
    Courses offered to provide competent students opportunities for study in areas of interest other than those elsewhere defined. This series is primarily a classroom function, either seminar or lecture, permitting flexibility in course offerings.
  
  • FI 531 Financial Management


    Credit, three hours.
    Details an examination of the role of financial management of the firm in short- and long-term resource planning and utilization. Emphasis is given to the basic techniques utilized in financial decision making, such as valuing cash flows, designing capital structure, managing working capital, and developing optimal investment policies. Prerequisite(s): FI 330 , AC 241 , AC 242  or equivalent.

French

  
  • FR 101 Elementary French I


    Credit, three hours.
    The first of a series of four semester-long courses that provides an overview of French language communication and cultures for travel, study and missions. Emphasis is on meaningful application of the language at a basic level, and the course is presented in manageable steps. Anyone who has had less than three years of highschool French should start with FR 101 as a review and move along with the series. Fall Semester Only.
  
  • FR 102 Elementary French II


    Credit, three hours.
    The second of a series of four semester-long courses that provides an overview of French language communication and cultures for travel, study and missions. Emphasis is on meaningful application of the language at a basic level, and the course is presented in manageable steps. Prerequisite(s): FR 101  or the equivalent. Spring Semester Only.
  
  • FR 201 Intermediate French I


    Credit, three hours.
    The third in a series of four semester-long courses that provides an overview of French language communication and cultures for travel, study and missions. Emphasis is on meaningful application of the language at an intermediate level, with a particular focus on drilling the grammar, writing, and reading skills necessary to bridge the student to a more developed ownership of the language. Students with four to five years of high school level French would enter the series at this level. Prerequisite(s): FR 102  or the equivalent. Fall Semester Only.
  
  • FR 202 Intermediate French II


    Credit, three hours.
    The fourth in a series of four semester-long courses that provides an overview of French language communication and cultures for travel, study and missions. Emphasis is on meaningful application of the language at an intermediate level, with a particular focus on synthesizing the elements and skills of all four courses in the series. Students complete the four course series in this semester and may choose to take two 300-level electives in order to fulfill the requirements for a minor in French. Prerequisite(s): FR 201  or the equivalent. Spring Semester Only.
 

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