2019-2020 Academic Catalog & Student Handbooks 
    
    May 18, 2024  
2019-2020 Academic Catalog & Student Handbooks [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


Course descriptions are listed alphabetically by subject prefix. Each course description begins with a subject prefix followed by a three-digit course number and the course title. If a course includes laboratory or other special activities, that information is contained in the course description. Prerequisites and co-requisites are also listed. A prerequisite is a course, experience, or other required preparation that must be completed before the student will be permitted to enroll in the course. A co-requisite is a course, experience, or other preparation that must be completed at the same time that the student is enrolled in the listed course.

Courses numbered 100 to 199 are primarily for freshmen, 200 to 299 for sophomores, 300 to 399 for juniors and seniors, and 400 to 499 for seniors. Courses numbered 500 and above are reserved for graduate students.

Please note, when searching courses by “Code or Number”, an asterisk (*) can be used to return mass results. For instance, a “Code or Number” search of ” 5* ” can be entered, returning all 500 or graduate-level courses.

 

Worship Leadership

  
  • WL 305 Advanced Audio Principles and System Design


    Credit, three hours.
    An in-depth look into the philosophy of sound, acoustics, room and system design. Students will learn how applying different techniques can change an acoustical environment and how to build varying sound systems for varied environments and needs.
  
  • WL 306 Acoustical Measurement Systems


    Credit, two hours.
    Training in analyzing the acoustics in a given environment. This class covers sound system optimization using software and hardware to create real time measurements and compensate for differing acoustical environments. Prerequisite(s): WL 305  
  
  • WL 310 Sequencing and MIDI Technologies


    Credit, two hours.
    And introduction and exploration of the Musical Instrument Digital Interface. With the use of sequencing software, students focus on creating music and instruments in the digital world. Prerequisite(s): WL 100  and WL 421  and WL 422  
  
  • WL 331 Junior Project/Internship


    Credit, one hour.
    Student will demonstrate mastery of a chosen field of the music and media industry through public performance, market studies, consultations, composing/arranging, recording, engineering or a combination of these and other skills OR a formal intern educational project in which the qualifying student gains practical experience (students may utilize this course to explore particular areas of interest in music, ministry, and technology).
  
  • WL 351 Biblical Foundations of Worship


    Credit, three hours.
    A study of biblical theology that provides the foundations of the praxis of worship in personal, community, and marketplace settings.
  
  • WL 352 Relational Issues in Worship


    Credit, three hours.
    A study of biblical patterns affecting relationships as they pertain to leadership, including analysis of the roles and functions of the worship leader, personality types, communication styles, conflict management and staff and community relationships.
  
  • WL 353 Biblical Principles of Leadership


    Credit, three hours.
    Introduces Worship Leadership students to a survey of Old and New Testament leadership principles with special emphasis on the person and centrality of Jesus Christ. 
  
  • WL 354 History and Philosophy of Worship and Music


    Credit, three hours.
    This course is designed to explore the historical origins and philosophy of Christian Worship and Music. Beginning with the Old Testament and continuing with the New Testament teachings of Christ, the class will discuss the Biblical principles of genuine worship and the emerging call of musical worship on the modern church. Additional emphasis will be placed on historical worship styles and revivals and the importance of the God-centered worship experience. A survey of the history of music from renaissance to contemporary era will be covered. Prerequisite(s): WL 353 . (WI)
  
  • WL 355 Practical Skills in Worship


    Credit, three hours.
    A survey of resources and techniques currently available to worship leaders, providing an overview of music theory, rehearsal techniques, vocal/choral/band techniques, event programming, preparation and flow of song lists, MIDI technology, sound reinforcement, use of drama and lighting and reading/conducting a musical score.
  
  • WL 364 Film Studio 1


    Credit, three hours.
    This course offers an overview of the editing software Final Cut Pro. Students will learn how to capture video, import, and edit for use in “live” worship applications. Students will learn skills and techniques for microphone placement, lighting, editing, story boarding, interviewing, script writing, and production of video projects. Students will gain experience in the application of video in worship with regard to IMAG, multi-site campus video production, streaming live to the web, and capturing content with extensive post-production edit time.
  
  • WL 365 Film Studio 2


    Credit, three hours.
    This course will instruct students in the creative process of film and digital video production. Students will be required to write a script, develop, produce and film several short video projects.
  
  • WL 366 Advanced Live Video Production


    Credit, three hours.
    Employing technologies used in the live video world, students will utilize broadcast-quality HD equipment to develop skills in lighting for video, advanced camera operation, directing, and advanced switching concepts. Special attention is given to proper lighting procedure, shot composition, and switching techniques. Prerequisite(s): WL 364  
  
  • WL 371 Finale I


    Credit, two hours.
    In this introductory course, student will learn how to write professional-standard notation using Finale, the world’s best-selling music notation software. This course will help student notate arrangements and compositions, from basic notes and rhythms to more advanced markings. Through hands-on lessons and workshops, student will understand the subtleties of notation, as well as explore the fine points of lead sheets, vocal/choral notation, drum/guitar notation, fingerings, roadmaps, and lyrics. Cross-listed as: MU 371 .
  
  • WL 372 Finale II


    Credit, two hours.
    In this advanced course, students will continue their professional development in writing professional-standard notation using Finale, the world’s best-selling music notation software. Student will explore more complex techniques designed to speed up the notation process dramatically, and learn to control the nuances of one’s music’s look and feel to produce clear, professional-quality music. By the end of the course, student will have mastered the most powerful functions of this versatile tool, and learned the techniques used by the most experienced, accomplished music engravers and writers. Course includes creating and/or printing music with and without a MIDI keyboard. Students work in a hands-on environment. Cross-listed as: MU 372 .
  
  • WL 380 Sound and Lighting Design


    Credit, three hours.
    This course is designed to train the student in sound reinforcement in a “live” application. Students will gain experience on both digital and analog consoles. They will be trained in the areas of amplification, equalization, compression, mixing, signal routing, critical listening, and overall design of sound systems. This course will also cover the design and incorporation of conventional and intelligent lighting in the “live” worship setting. Fixture placement, dimming system design, and programming will be discussed in this course.
  
  • WL 381 Advanced Lighting Technology


    Credit, three hours.
    An in-depth examination of the real and virtual world of lighting design and programming. The course focuses on console theory, programing fundamentals, and conventional vs automated fixtures. Prerequisite(s): WL 380  
  
  • WL 405 Live Mixing and Recording


    Credit, two hours.
    An exploration of techniques used for audio recording and reinforcement systems on location. Topics include systems integration of live sound reinforcement, live recording and capture. This class focuses on the techniques and applications employed in live concert/worship recording. Prerequisite(s): WL 305  
  
  • WL 411 The Entrepreneur Musician


    Credit, three hours.
    A survey of the nature and history of entrepreneurship in the music industry. Topics include: the basics of running a one-person business, recognizing and creating opportunity, personal and professional financial management, product/legal risks and benefits, establishing a business model and creating potential income streams.
  
  • WL 412 Christian Ethics and the Performing Arts


    Credit, three hours.
    An in-depth study of Christian ethics and its particular application to church music and the performing arts. Using contemporary case studies and student research, attention will be given to the history of ethics and to the processes of informed ethical decision-making for the musician/artist serving in the church, engaged in the arts community, or employed in the entertainment industry. Cross-listed as: MU 412 . PY 412  may be substituted. (WI)
  
  • WL 421 Introduction to Pro-Tools


    Credit, three hours.
    The application of principles necessary to complete a Pro-Tools project, from initial setup to final mix-down. Class involves recording of live instruments and vocals. Topics include creating first session, making first audio recording, importing media, introducing MIDI, selecting and navigating basic editing techniques, introducing mixing and finishing work. Lab Fee Applies.
  
  • WL 421L Recording Lab 1


    Credit, zero hours.
    Applied experience and skill development in Recording Engineering Techniques. Corequisite(s): WL 421  
  
  • WL 422 Recording Engineering Techniques


    Credit, three hours.
    An advanced approach to the fundamentals of the recording environment and its function in the music industry. Topics include basic studio electronics and signal flow, basic microphone design, studio acoustics, basic session procedures and the role of the engineer. Lab Fee Applies.
  
  • WL 422L Recording Lab 2


    Credit, zero hours.
    Applied experience and skill development in Intermediate Recording Techniques. Corequisite(s): WL 422  
  
  • WL 423 Advanced Recording Projects


    Credit, two hours.
    A survey of all the necessary steps of any music production project.  Students will be expected arrange music and create a demo, schedule the player and session, rehearse the band, record in the studio, and produce a final mix. Prerequisite(s): WL 421   and WL 422  
  
  • WL 441 Senior Project


    Credit, one hour.
    Student will demonstrate mastery of a chosen field of the music and media industry through public performance, market studies, consultations, composing/arranging, recording, engineering or a combination of these and other skills. This project is analogous to the senior recital.
  
  • WL 442 Internship


    Credit, one hour.
    A formal intern educational project in which the qualifying student gains practical experience. Students may utilize this course to explore particular areas of interest in music, ministry, and technology.
  
  • WL 515 Practical Technologies for todays Worship Leader


    Credit, three hours.
    A practical approach to using today’s worship technologies successfully in a blended and contemporary worship setting. We will teach how to implement and successfully use digital libraries, iPads, mp3’s & stems in a diverse musical environment. We will create and use Multitracks with click tracks in a multi-styled approach for both rehearsal and live events. We will explore the expansive possibilities of MIDI and mass production techniques using lighting, sound and theatrical effects. Cross-listed as:   
  
  • WL 520 Worship Leader as Pastor


    Credit, three hours.
    This course will teach pastoral elements of caring and leading a congregation and discipleship from within the Worship Arts. It will also build upon communication and musical skills, providing support for students to improve and care for their congregations and musicians. Students will explore a variety of styles of worship leadership, rehearsal preparation, and delivery in order to improve their worship style. Through review of their own services and other research, students will be evaluated and coached in platform and musical skills.
  
  • WL 550 Foundations of Leadership


    Credit, three hours.
    This course will analyze the history of leadership and its corresponding motivations and effects through a variety of avenues, including case studies, group discussions, and personal observation.
  
  • WL 552 Relational Issues in Worship


    Credit, three hours.
    A study of biblical patterns affecting relationships as they pertain to leadership, including analysis of the roles and functions of the worship leader, personality types, communication styles, conflict management and staff and community relationships. Graduate students would be required to present a paper on a case-study in relational issues as approved by the instructor. Cross-listed as:   
  
  • WL 554 History and Philosophy of Music and Worship


    Credit, three hours.
    This course is designed to explore the historical origins and philosophy of Christian Worship and Music. Beginning with the Old Testament and continuing with the New Testament teachings of Christ, the class will discuss the Biblical principles of genuine worship and the emerging call of musical worship on the modern church. Additional emphasis will be placed on historical worship styles and revivals and the importance of the God-centered worship experience. A survey of the history of music from renaissance to contemporary era will be covered. Graduate students will research and present a paper on a topic approved by the instructor. Prerequisite(s): WL 353  
  
  • WL 555 Practical Skill in Worship


    Credit, three hours.
    A survey of resources and techniques currently available to worship leaders, providing an overview of music theory, rehearsal techniques, vocal/choral/band techniques, event programming, preparation and flow of song lists, MIDI technology, sound reinforcement, use of drama and lighting and reading/conducting a musical score. Graduate students would be required to plan and execute a worship service for outside visitors. 

Athletic Training

  
  • AT 501 Principles of Athletic Training


    Credit, three hours.
    This course is designed to provide the graduate level athletic training student with basic terminology of the athletic training profession while addressing concepts in professional responsibilities of the athletic trainer,diagnostic coding, risk management, injury pathology, domains of practice, and care and prevention of musculoskeletal and general medical conditions. Three hours lecture. Prerequisite(s): Admission into the MAT program.
  
  • AT 505 Management of Medical Emergencies


    Credit, three hours.
    The course will provide the student with foundational knowledge for determining identifiable risk factors for disease, preparation of emergency action plans, and recognition and care of medical emergencies. The course leads to professional rescuer CPR certification. Observation within an emergency department (5 hours) as well as a ride along with emergency medical services (3 hours) will be required throughout the semester. Three hours lecture. Prerequisite(s): Current CPR certification (either Basic Life Support of Professional Rescuer) and admission into the MAT program
  
  • AT 510 Clinical Skills Lab I


    Credit, one hour.
    This 10-week clinical skills lab is designed to provide the student with hands on approach through simulation and real-life guided scenarios dealing with emergent care of the injured patient. Skills acquisition in: CPR (1 and 2 persons/ adult, child, infant CPR), AED, choking, airway adjuncts, spine boarding, management of shock, taping, bracing, splinting, auscultations, nutritional and enviromneal concerns, care of musculoskeletal and general medical conditions.This course will require assessment of clinical skills. One hour lab. Prerequisite(s): Admission into the MAT program
  
  • AT 511 Clinical Skills Lab II


    Credit, one hour.
    This10-week clinical skills lab is designed to provide the student with a hands on approach through simulation and real-life guided scenarios. The use of high and low fidelity manikins for simulations as well as real patient care will be instituted throughout. The course will be comprehensive in nature and require assessment of clinical skills. One hour lab. Prerequisite(s): Admission into the MAT program and successful completion of all courses within Term I.
  
  • AT 512 Clinical Skills Lab III


    Credit, one hour.
    This 10-week clinical skills lab is designed to provide the student with a hands on approach through simulation and real-life guided scenarios. The use of high and low fidelity manikins for simulations as well as real patient care will be instituted throughout. The course will be comprehensive in nature and require assessment ofclinical skills One hour lab. Prerequisite(s): Admission into the MAT program and successful completion of all courses within Term I and II.
  
  • AT 513 Clinical Skills Lab IV


    Credit, one hour.
    This 10-week clinical skills lab course places emphasis on all aspects of patient care from injury prevention,evaluation, and rehabilitation. The use of high and low fidelity manikins for simulations as well as real patient care will be instituted throughout.The course will be comprehensive in nature and require assessment of clinical skills One hour lab. Prerequisite(s): Admission into the MAT program and successful completion of all courses within Term I-IV
  
  • AT 515 Evidence Based Practice I


    Credit, one hour.
    This course investigates the concepts of evidence based practice as it relates specifically to healthcare. Students will focus on defining a clinically relevant question, searching for the best evidence through primary literature searches, determining the quality of the research, applying the evidence to clinical practice, and evaluating the process through which to generate a plan of care. The course will allow the student to begin the process of developing a thesis topic for the senior level research course. One hour lecture. Prerequisite(s): Admission into the MAT program and successful completion of all courses within Term I.
  
  • AT 520 Evaluation of Musculoskeletal Injuries Lower Extremity


    Credit,four hours.
    The course combines both lecture and lab and provides the student with techniques and tools for effective evaluation of a patient. Surveys musculoskeletal injuries specific to the lower extremity, i.e., symptoms, initial and secondary clinical evaluation, and special tests leading to clinical impressions. This course includes lectures as well as hands-on laboratory sessions. Three hours lecture and one hour lab. Prerequisite(s): Admission into the MAT program and successful completion of all courses within Term I.
  
  • AT 525 Therapeutic Interventions Lower Extremity


    Credit, four hours.
    This course investigates the techniques of rehabilitation and therapeutic modalities to assist the patient in returning to his or her optimal potential in sports activities or activities of daily living. The course will focus on lower extremity issues; specific to rehabilitation protocols and return to activities of daily living. Three hours lecture and one hour lab. Prerequisite(s): Admission into the MAT program and successful completion of all courses within Term I.
  
  • AT 530 Evaluation of Musculoskeletal Injuries Upper Extremity


    Credit, four hours
    The course combines both lecture and lab and provides the student with techniques and tools for effective evaluation of a patient. Surveys musculoskeletal injuries specific to the upper extremity, i.e., symptoms, initial and secondary clinical evaluation, and special tests leading to clinical impressions. This course includes lectures as well as hands-on laboratory sessions. Three hours lecture and one hour lab. Prerequisite(s): Admission into the MAT program and successful completion of all courses within Term I and II.
  
  • AT 535 Therapeutic Interventions Upper Extremity


    Credit, four hours.
    This course investigates the techniques of rehabilitation and therapeutic modalities to assist the patient in returning to his or her optimal potential in sports activities or activities of daily living. The course will focus on upper extremity issues; specific to rehabilitation protocols and return to activities of daily living. Three hours lecture and one hour lab. Prerequisite(s): Admission into the MAT program and successful completion of all courses within Term I and II.
  
  • AT 540 Psychosocial Strategies in Athletic Training


    Credit, three hours.
    The course focuses on common psychological principles related to but not limited to: coping skills, motivation, goal setting, body image issues, nutritional concepts, drug and alcohol abuse, stages of grief/loss, and treatment and referral strategies for acute and chronic conditions. Observation with a licensed counselor will be required for a minimum of 10 hours. Three hours lecture. Prerequisite(s): Admission into the MAT program and successful completion of all courses within Term I-III.
  
  • AT 545 Advanced Diagnostic Imaging


    Credit, one hour.
    This course places emphasis on interpretation and identification of injuries and disease through medical imaging. Specific emphasis will be on theory and application of radiography, magnetic resonance imaging,computed tomography, fluoroscope, and bone scans. This course is held on campus during May term. One hour lecture. Prerequisite(s): Admission into the MAT program and successful completion of all courses within Term I-III.
  
  • AT 550 Introduction to Pharmacology


    Credit, three hours.
    This course will investigate the pharmacological indications and contraindications of commonly used over the counter medications, narcotics, classifications of drugs, side effects, and effects on the body. Special emphasis will be placed on state and federal laws pertaining to commonly used medications within the athletic training facility. Three hours lecture Prerequisite(s): Admission into the MAT program and successful completion of all courses within Term I-III
  
  • AT 555 BOC Exam Preparation


    Credit, one hour.
    This course is designed to prepare the student with the necessary study materials and tools to be successful on the Board of Certification exam. The course will be a comprehensive review of the BOC exam candidate handbook, practice analysis, professional domains and completion of BOC prep materials. The course will require successful completion of a written exam and an oral practicum exam to complete course requirements. Prerequisite(s): Admission into the MAT program and successful completion of all courses within Term I-IV
  
  • AT 560 Management Strategies in Athletic Training


    Credit, three hours.
    This course focuses on the administrative components of athletic training with emphasis on professional behaviors and professional development. Emphasis will be placed on legal, ethical, financial, facility, technological, operational, administrative, cultural, and leadership issues related to issues within athletic training. Three hours lecture. Prerequisite(s): Admission into the MAT program and successful completion of all courses within Term I-IV
  
  • AT 565 Evaluation of Head, Neck, and Spinal Injuries


    Credit, four hours.
    Surveys head, spine, and internal injuries, i.e., symptoms, initial and secondary clinical evaluation, and special tests leading to clinical impressions.Develops concepts in implementing emergency care and training room procedures. Three hours lecture and one hour lab. Prerequisite(s): Admission into the MAT program and successful completion of all courses within Term I-IV
  
  • AT 570 General Medical Conditions Assessment


    Credit, three hours
    This course is designed to present a collection of knowledge, skills, and values that the athletic training student must possess to recognize, treat and refer when appropriate, the general medical conditions and disabilities of athletes and others involved in physical activity over a lifespan. Three hours lecture. Prerequisite(s): Admission into the MAT program and successful completionof all courses within Term I-IV
  
  • AT 575 Research Design in Athletic Training


    Credit, three hours.
    This course provides the student the opportunity to explore areas of interest within the field of athletic training through a graduate level thesis. The course will require a formal presentation with peers and university faculty. Three hours lecture. Prerequisite(s): Admission into the MAT program and successful completion of all courses within Term I-V
  
  • AT 580 Advanced Athletic Training Techniques


    Credit, one hour.
    This eight-week course will highlight specific techniques utilized in the profession of athletic training. Special emphasis will be on instrument assisted soft tissue mobilization, kinesiotaping, dry needling, cupping therapy,massage, and functional movement screening. One hour lab. Prerequisite(s): Admission into the MAT program and successful completion of all courses within Term I-V
  
  • AT 585 Senior Capstone in Athletic Training


    Credit, one hour.
    This course will allow the student the opportunity to attend weekly faculty and staff clinical case studies and critiques of current research. The student will be required to present to faculty, staff, and students at least three clinical case studies, complete the athletic training portfolio and register for the BOC exam (no earlier than March/April). One hour lecture. Prerequisite(s): Admission into the MAT program and successful completion of all courses within Term I-V
  
  • AT 590 Clinical I-Pediatric/ Adolescent Emphasis


    Credit, two hours.
    This 15-week (3-week immersion; 12-week experience) clinical practicum will emphasize continuity of skills required for patient assessment, care, treatment and rehabilitation of the injured athlete under the direct supervision of the clinical supervisor (preceptors) within a middle/ high school setting. Two hour clinical. Prerequisite(s): Admission into the MAT program and successful completion of all courses within Term I.
  
  • AT 591 Clinical II-College/ Professional Emphasis


    Credit, two hours.
    This 15-week (3-week immersion; 12-week experience) clinical practicum places emphasis on developing a continuity of the skills required for patient assessment, care, treatment and rehabilitation of the injured athlete under the direct supervision of the clinical supervisor (preceptors) for college/ professional athletes. This course may expose the student to both intramural and intercollegiate sports activities. Two hour clinical. Prerequisite(s): Admission into the MAT program and successful completion of all courses within Term I and II.
  
  • AT 592 Clinical III-General Medical/ Orthopaedic/ Physical Therapy/ Wellness/ Nutrition


    Credit, two hours.
    This (16 total week) clinical component will allow the student multiple clinical rotations over the course of the semester. Each component will consist of a 4-week rotation. Each rotation will consist of 40 hours of supervised experience. The course will develop a rotation of interprofessional education with various healthcare professionals within the area of Mobile. Rotations will include a general medical, orthopedic (surgery observation), physical therapy,wellness and nutritional. Two hour clinical. Prerequisite(s): Admission into the MAT program and successful completion of all courses within Term I-IV
  
  • AT 593 Clinical IV-Elective Clinical Immersion


    Credit, two hours.
    This eight-week clinical immersion will be the student’s choice for site placement. Sites must be within a 50-mile radius of the University of Mobile, the preceptor must undergo preceptor training, and an affiliated site agreement must be on file at least one month prior to the start of the experience. The preceptor must hold the AT credential. Two hour clinical. Prerequisite(s): Admission into the MAT program and successful completion of all courses within Term I-V
 

Page: 1 <- Back 107 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17