2019-2020 Academic Catalog & Student Handbooks 
    
    Jun 13, 2024  
2019-2020 Academic Catalog & Student Handbooks [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


Course descriptions are listed alphabetically by subject prefix. Each course description begins with a subject prefix followed by a three-digit course number and the course title. If a course includes laboratory or other special activities, that information is contained in the course description. Prerequisites and co-requisites are also listed. A prerequisite is a course, experience, or other required preparation that must be completed before the student will be permitted to enroll in the course. A co-requisite is a course, experience, or other preparation that must be completed at the same time that the student is enrolled in the listed course.

Courses numbered 100 to 199 are primarily for freshmen, 200 to 299 for sophomores, 300 to 399 for juniors and seniors, and 400 to 499 for seniors. Courses numbered 500 and above are reserved for graduate students.

Please note, when searching courses by “Code or Number”, an asterisk (*) can be used to return mass results. For instance, a “Code or Number” search of ” 5* ” can be entered, returning all 500 or graduate-level courses.

 

Business Administration

  
  • BA 592 Special Topics in Business


    Credit, three hours.
    An examination of significant issues, theories, and practical problems in one of the areas of Accounting (AC), Business Administration (BA), Computer Information Systems (CIS), Economics (EC), Finance (FI), Management (MGT) or Marketing (MKT). The course content is selected by the instructor to fit the needs of current students.

Bachelor of Business Administration

  
  • BBA 202 Principles of Microeconomics


    Credit, three hours.
    The study of the business firm, the household, and consumer behavior, including the price system, price determination and change, production and cost theory, and market structures.
  
  • BBA 241 Principles of Accounting I


    Credit, three hours.
    Theory of debits and credits; journals and ledgers; asset and liability valuations; income determination; financial statement preparation and interpretation; accounting for proprietorships, partnerships, and corporations; basic concepts of managerial accounting. Must be taken in sequence.
  
  • BBA 242 Principles of Accounting II


    Credit, three hours.
    Theory of debits and credits; journals and ledgers; asset and liability valuations; income determination; financial statement preparation and interpretation; accounting for proprietorships, partnerships, and corporations; basic concepts of managerial accounting. Must be taken in sequence. Prerequisite(s): BBA 241 .
  
  • BBA 301 Information Management


    Credit, three hours.
    An overview of information processing and management information systems. The course covers the use of information technology to design competitive and efficient organizations. Structured methods which can be applied to any business system will be covered. Prerequisite(s): CIS 101  
  
  • BBA 311 Principles of Marketing


    Credit, three hours.
    A fundamental study of marketing strategy. The course emphasizes market analysis, product, price, distribution channels, and promotion. Prerequisite(s): BBA 202 .
  
  • BBA 319 Business Analytics


    Credit, three hours.
    This course uses data, information technology, statistical analysis, quantitative methods, and mathematical or computer-based models to help students understand how managers gain insight about business operations for improved fact-based decision making. Students will be expected to use Excel and apply statistical knowledge in learning topics such as predictive modeling and analysis, forecasting techniques, simulation and risk analysis, data mining, and prescriptive analytics using linear optimization. Prerequisite(s): CIS 101 , MA 211 .
  
  • BBA 321 Principles of Management


    Credit, three hours.
    A study of the theory and practice of management as a universal discipline applicable to all areas of human endeavor. Emphases are on managerial functions and organizational structure. This course is a prerequisite for all other courses in management.
  
  • BBA 322 Human Resource Management


    Credit, three hours.
    This course is a study of the relationships of individual workers to their work environments. Includes personnel management, labor relations, and labor legislation. Prerequisite(s): BBA 321 .
  
  • BBA 330 Principles of Finance


    Credit, three hours.
    Introduction to the concepts and techniques of financial management within a business organization. This course includes an overview of the environment of financial management, valuation principles, capital budgeting, risk, cost of capital, long-term financing, and working capital management. Prerequisite(s): BBA 241  and MA 110 .
  
  • BBA 333 Leadership in Organizations


    Credit, three hours.
    A basic study of the theory and practice of leadership in organizations. The course focuses on managerial leadership and presents a broad survey of the current theories and research on leadership in formal organizations. Topics will include ethics, motivation, the use and abuse of power and privilege, leadership in teams, transactional and transformational leadership, and servant leadership.
  
  • BBA 336 Business and Technical Writing


    Credit, three hours.
    An introduction to correspondence and report formats used in business and industry. Prerequisite(s): EN 101 , EN 102 , and CIS 101 . (WI)
  
  • BBA 353 Business Law


    Credit, three hours.
    A comprehensive study of the Uniform Commercial Code dealing with contracts, agency and employment, commercial paper, personal property and bailments, sales of goods, partnerships, corporations, bankruptcy, trusts, estates, and government regulations.
  
  • BBA 365 Social Media in Business


    Credit, three hours.
    Provides a conceptual understanding of how social media technologies are disrupting traditional business environments. Students will gain practical knowledge and application in the use of social media tools as they relate to business. Prerequisite(s): CIS 101 .
  
  • BBA 401 Organizational Behavior and Human Relations


    Credit, three hours.
    This course is a study of the interpersonal and interorganizational relationships of people working in groups. It covers topics such as communication, leadership, motivation, power, and group behavior. Credit can be earned for only one of these courses. Prerequisite(s): BBA 321 .
  
  • BBA 426 Social Responsibility and Managerial Ethics


    Credit, three hours.
    This course is an investigation into the relationships between business managers and their social responsibilities to both private and public sector; utilizes case studies. Prerequisite(s): BBA 321 .
  
  • BBA 430 Global Business


    Credit, three hours.
    This course considers the theory and practice of international business with emphasis on the external environments of the modern multinational corporation. Prerequisite(s): EC 201  and BBA 202 .
  
  • BBA 431 Independent Study


    Maximum Credit, three hours.
    A student who has completed at least eighteen semester hours with a 3.00 GPA or higher in the major may be eligible for independent study or a research project in the major area. Requires approval of the advisor, instructor, and dean of the School of Business.
  
  • BBA 432 Independent Study


    Maximum Credit, three hours.
    A student who has completed at least eighteen semester hours with a 3.00 GPA or higher in the major may be eligible for independent study or a research project in the major area. Requires approval of the advisor, instructor, and dean of the School of Business.
  
  • BBA 450 Project Management


    Credit, three hours.
    Practical knowledge involving applications and skills in project management.  Topics include project requirements, project design, practices, quality management, resource scheduling, risk management, team dynamics and leadership, communication with stakeholders, training and project documentation.  This course includes the use of project management software. Prerequisite(s): CIS 101 .
  
  • BBA 454 Strategic Management


    Credit, three hours.
    Using the concepts of strategic management, students will be required to integrate and synthesize information under both prepared and extemporaneous conditions. This course serves as the capstone course for the BBA major. Note: Students should schedule this course in the last Spring term of their program or with instructor approval.  Students enrolled in the on-ground BBA program are not allowed to register for the online sections of BBA 454 and BBA 460 courses. (WI)
  
  • BBA 460 Business Senior Seminar


    Credit, one hour.
    This course is required for all bachelor of business majors. It should be taken concurrently with BBA 454 Strategic Management . It provides an overview of the entire business core curriculum to identify areas for improvement. The course will culminate with the administration of assessment instruments for evaluating learning and critical thinking skills. The course includes preparation for successful career management.  Students enrolled in the on-ground BBA program are not allowed to register for the online BBA 454 and BBA 460 courses. Prerequisite(s): Senior standing or permission.
  
  • BBA 497 Study in Selected Topics


    Credit, one to six hours.
    Courses offered to provide opportunities for competent students to study in areas of interest other than those elsewhere defined. This series is primarily a classroom function, either seminar or lecture, permitting flexibility in course offerings.
  
  • BBA 498 Study in Selected Topics


    Credit, one to six hours.
    Courses offered to provide opportunities for competent students to study in areas of interest other than those elsewhere defined. This series is primarily a classroom function, either seminar or lecture, permitting flexibility in course offerings.

Biology

  
  • BIO 101 Introduction to Biology


    Credit, four hours.
    An overview of a variety of topics from biology including ecology, classification, cell structure, cell division, respiration, photosynthesis, genetics, and plant and animal systems. This course is designed for students with limited backgrounds who are not planning to major in biology. It fulfills one of the laboratory science requirements of the core curriculum. It will not satisfy the requirements for either a biology major or minor. Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory.
  
  • BIO 103 Introduction to Marine Science


    Credit, four hours.
    An introduction to a variety of topics in biological, chemical, and physical marine science. This course is designed for students who are not majoring in marine science but have an interest in learning more about the marine environment. It fulfills one of the laboratory science requirements of the University’s basic course requirements but will not satisfy the requirements for the biology major or minor. Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory. Cross-listed as: MAR 103 .
  
  • BIO 105 Introduction to Anatomy and Physiology


    Credit, four hours.
    An introduction to the structure and function of the human body. This is an online lecture-based course with an online laboratory component. It is designed for non-science majors and will satisfy one of the laboratory science requirements of the core curriculm. It will not satisfy the requirements for either a biology major or minor.
  
  • BIO 201 Human Anatomy and Physiology I


    Credit, four hours.
    A study of the structure and function of each system of the human body. The first academic period (semester) includes the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous, and sensory systems. The second academic period (semester) covers endocrinology, digestion, metabolism, respiration, circulation, excretion, and reproduction. Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory.
  
  • BIO 202 Human Anatomy and Physiology II


    Credit, four hours.
    A study of the structure and function of each system of the human body. The first academic period (semester) includes the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous, and sensory systems. The second academic period (semester) covers endocrinology, digestion, metabolism, respiration, circulation, excretion, and reproduction. Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory.
  
  • BIO 210 Introduction to Biotechnology


    Credit, four hours.
    An overview of the emerging field of biotechnology, with emphasis on the topics of forensic science, cloning, and stem cell research. This course is designed for non-science majors who have an interest in the science behind these current topics, as well as for science majors who are not familiar with biotechnology and are seeking a 200-level BIO elective. The ethical and moral issues raised by this new field of science will also be addressed in the course. Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory.
  
  • BIO 211 General Biology I


    Credit, four hours.
    A study of the fundamental principles of life science. The first academic period (semester) includes cell structure, metabolic processes, genetics, development, and environmental interactions. The second academic period (semester) includes taxonomy and a survey of life forms with emphasis on plants and animals. Under normal circumstances, BIO 211 must precede BIO 212  . Not open to non-science majors. Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory.
  
  • BIO 212 General Biology II


    Credit, four hours.
    A study of the fundamental principles of life science. The first academic period (semester) includes cell structure, metabolic processes, genetics, development, and environmental interactions. The second academic period (semester) includes taxonomy and a survey of life forms with emphasis on plants and animals. Under normal circumstances, BIO 211  must be taken before BIO 212. Not open to non-science majors. Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory.
  
  • BIO 214 Introduction to Nutrition


    Credit, four hours.
    Introduction to the metabolism of protein, fat, and carbohydrates in the human body; the biological role of vitamins and minerals; nutrient requirements during the life cycle; assessment of dietary intake and nutritional status. Course designed for both non-majors and science majors. Non-majors can use this course to fulfill a laboratory science requirement.  3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab.
  
  • BIO 215 Introduction to Food Science


    Credit, four hours.
    Students will explore key food groups and composition and the functional properties of the major food components. The food chemistry covered will look at the physical properties of foods. Food law and history will provide historical perpective, as well as, information on food additives, nutrition labeling, and food regulation. Basic food processing methods will be covered, as well as, food microbiology, fermentation, food handling, food safety, food contamination, HACCP principles, and toxicology. Food product development and marketing will also be discussed. Course designed for both non-majors and science majors. Non-majors can use this course to fulfill a laboratory science requirement. Three hours lecture, two hours lab.
  
  • BIO 242 Criminal Forensics


    Credit, three hours.
    Criminal Forensics is a course designed for 200 level non-science majors. It is an intensive survey of applications of multiple scientific disciplines to the criminal justice system and taught by the Natural Sciences Department. The lecture will combine practical applications of chemistry, physics and biology with specific instruction geared toward current techniques used in processing physical evidence. The students will research and orally present case studies.
  
  • BIO 297 Study in Selected Topics


    Credit, one to six hours.
    Courses offered to provide opportunities for students to study in areas of interest other than those elsewhere defined. This series is primarily a classroom function, either seminar or lecture, permitting flexibility in course offerings.
  
  • BIO 298 Study in Selected Topics


    Credit, one to six hours.
    Courses offered to provide opportunities for students to study in areas of interest other than those elsewhere defined. This series is primarily a classroom function, either seminar or lecture, permitting flexibility in course offerings.
  
  • BIO 301 Microbiology


    Credit, four hours.
    A study of microorganisms from the standpoint of classification, morphology, and physiology. The course includes infectious diseases, immune mechanisms, and environmental and applied microbiology. Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory.
  
  • BIO 305 Field Botany


    Credit, four hours.
    A study of the characteristics and classification of plants and plant-like organisms including the monera, protista, fungi, and plantae. Laboratory will emphasize collection and field studies of vascular plants. Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory. Prerequisite(s): BIO 211 , BIO 212 .
  
  • BIO 310 Genetics


    Credit, three hours.
    A study of the basic principles of inheritance, including Mendelian principles, mechanisms of gene action and transfer, and population genetics. Topics in molecular biology, genetic diseases, and the role of genetics in biotechnology will also be addressed. This course is designed for Biology majors and does not fulfill the core requirement of a laboratory science course for nonscience majors. Three hours lecture. Prerequisite(s):  ,  , and  ,  .
  
  • BIO 313 General Physiology


    Credit, four hours.
    A study of principles and mechanisms of animal function with emphasis on human systems. Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory. Prerequisite(s): BIO 211 , BIO 212  and   .
  
  • BIO 320 Ecology and Field Biology


    Credit, four hours.
    A study of the relationships of organisms to each other and to their environments, the structure and distribution of plant and animal communities, and the ecology of populations. Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory. Prerequisite(s): BIO 211 , BIO 212 ; EN 101 , EN 102 . (WI)
  
  • BIO 340 Marine Biology


    Credit, four hours.
    A general survey of marine plants, invertebrates and vertebrates, the communities they form, and the physical and chemical factors that influence them. Field trips to marsh and beach habitats, sampling from research vessels, and laboratory exercises serve to introduce students to the diversity of marine habitats and organisms. Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory. Cross-listed as: MAR 340 . Prerequisite(s): BIO 211 , BIO 212 ; MA 112 ;  ,  .
  
  • BIO 390 Scientific Literature and Scientific Writing


    Credit, three hours.
    A writing-intensive (WI) introduction to current scientific writing and research in biology. The course includes instruction in scientific literature, scientific data retrieval, scientific grant writing and research techniques. The course will culminate in the preparation of a critical review or research manuscript.  Lecture. Prerequisite(s): BIO 211  , BIO 212  , CH 201  , CH 202  , EN 101  , EN 102  (WI)
  
  • BIO 402 Immunology


    Credit, four hours.
    Immunology is the study of the immune system-the body’s defense against infections. Antigen recognition, lymphocyte development, innate and adaptive immunity, and the immune system in health and disease will be covered.  Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory. Prerequisite(s): BIO 211  , BIO 212  , CH 211, CH 212
  
  • BIO 404 Biochemistry


    Credit, three hours.
    The chemistry of biological systems with emphasis on bioenergetics and the important biological molecules, metabolism, synthesis and degradation. Three hours lecture. Cross-listed as: CH 404 . Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in all of the following:

    BIO 211 , BIO 212 ;

      ,  , CH 312 .

  
  • BIO 407 Forensic Science


    Credit, four hours.
    This interdisciplinary course will describe the scientific methods behind the forensic analysis of hair, DNA, tool marks, blood, glass, soil, and more. Students will learn these basic concepts and then apply them to evidence collected during various problem-solving and critical-thinking scenarios. This course is designed for upper-level science majors. Three hours lecture, two hours lab. Cross-listed as:  . Prerequisite(s): BIO 211 , BIO 212 ,  , CH 201 ,  .
  
  • BIO 408 Science and Ethics


    Credit, three hours.
    A study of the foundations for moral reflection, including a consideration of biomedical and scientific issues in the light of these truths. Cross-listed as:    Prerequisite(s): Upper level standing/Instructor approval. (WI)
  
  • BIO 410 Medical Parasitology


    Credit, three hours.
    The basic concepts of parasites are reviewed with a historical background and followed with modern parasitology studies, diseases and technology.  Special emphasis is given to the structure, function and interrelationships between the parasitic organisms, the host organism(s) and the environmental relationships.  Investigations of the physiology and mechanisms of healthy and diseased organisms with regards to parasitic infections.  Biology 410 is a “life Science” course intended to provide an in-depth study in the field of medical parasitology.  Students are expected to utilize problem-solving portions and exercises to augment textbook and lecture materials.

     

  
  • BIO 414 Mammalogy


    Credit, four hours.
    A study of the life history, identification, taxonomy, and distribution of mammals with emphasis on Alabama species. Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory. Prerequisite(s): BIO 211 , BIO 212 .
  
  • BIO 416 Herpetology


    Credit, four hours.
    A study of collection, preservation, identification, taxonomy, and distribution of amphibians and reptiles with emphasis on species common to south Alabama. Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory. Prerequisite(s): BIO 211 , BIO 212 .
  
  • BIO 425 Human Gross Anatomy


    Credit, four hours.
    This course is designed as an advanced laboratory-based course in clinical gross anatomy. This course in gross anatomy will examine the form and function of the human body at the macroscopic level. Detailed system-based and regional anatomy discussions are enhanced by hands-on cadaver dissections of: back and upper limbs, head and neck, thorax and abdomen, pelvis and lower limbs.  May be repeated once for an additional four credit hours. Cross-listed as: BIO 525 Prerequisite(s): BIO 201, BIO 202, and Instructor Approval; Specific to MAT Program Students: Admission into the MAT program and successful completion of all courses within Term I and II
  
  • BIO 431 Independent Study


    Maximum credit, eight hours.
    Courses offered to provide opportunities for students to pursue an independent research project in the major area, with the approval of the advisor, instructor, and the dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. Prerequisite(s): Completion of at least eighteen semester hours with a 3.00 GPA or higher in the major. (See independent study contract for requirements and details.)
  
  • BIO 432 Independent Study


    Maximum credit, eight hours.
    Courses offered to provide opportunities for students to pursue an independent research project in the major area, with the approval of the advisor, instructor, and the dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. Prerequisite(s): Completion of at least eighteen semester hours with a 3.00 GPA or higher in the major. (See independent study contract for requirements and details.)
  
  • BIO 437 Limnology


    Credit, four hours.
    An introduction to the study of aquatic environments from an ecological perspective. Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory. Prerequisite(s): BIO 211 , BIO 212 ;  ,  .
  
  
  • BIO 490 Capstone


    Credit, three hours.
    This course provides a capstone experience consisting of a comprehensive review and integrated examination of important concepts taken from required BIO/CH/MAR courses within the curriculum. Prerequisite(s): Senior standing with a major in biology or marine science.
  
  • BIO 495 Field Experience


    Credit, one to three hours.
    An opportunity for the student to gain experiential knowledge about health related fields, specific biological habitats, or groups of organisms. This course will be offered outside of the traditional academic periods (semesters). Prerequisite(s): Junior or senior standing or permission of instructor.
  
  • BIO 496 Field Experience


    Credit, one to three hours.
    An opportunity for the student to gain experiential knowledge about health related fields, specific biological habitats, or groups of organisms. This course will be offered outside of the traditional academic periods (semesters). Prerequisite(s): Junior or senior standing or permission of instructor.
  
  • BIO 497 Study in Selected Topics


    Credit, one to six hours.
    Courses offered to provide opportunities for students to study in areas of interest other than those elsewhere defined. This series is primarily a classroom function, either seminar or lecture, permitting flexibility in course offerings.
  
  • BIO 498 Study in Selected Topics


    Credit, one to six hours.
    Courses offered to provide opportunities for students to study in areas of interest other than those elsewhere defined. This series is primarily a classroom function, either seminar or lecture, permitting flexibility in course offerings.
  
  • BIO 525 Human Gross Anatomy


    Credit, four hours.
    This course is designed as an advanced laboratory-based course in clinical gross anatomy. This course in gross anatomy will examine the form and function of the human body at the macroscopic level. Detailed system-based and regional anatomy discussions are enhanced by hands-on cadaver dissections of: back and upper limbs, head and neck, thorax and abdomen, pelvis and lower limbs.  May be repeated once for an additional four credit hours. Cross-listed as: BIO 425 Prerequisite(s): BIO 201, BIO 202, and Instructor Approval; Specific to MAT Program Students: Admission into the MAT program and successful completion of all courses within Term I and II

Biology (Dauphin Island Sea Lab Only)

  
  • BIO 220 Dolphins and Whales


    Credit, two hours.
    This course is to enable the student to make rapid, accurate, and thoughtful use of a customized reference file and laboratory and field notes to respond to questions about the classification, anatomy, and ecology of members of the order Cetacea and of the Sirenian genus Trichechus (manatee). Such topics include discussion of the people and places that have been involved in the studies. This course will consist of lectures supported by audiovisual materials and practical exercises in the laboratory of the standing network (Mobile) and on vessel-based and land-based platforms. Rather than being reading, writing, or memory intensive, the activities of the student will be more nearly project intensive, with emphasis on construction of a reference file and organization of records of the laboratory and field observations. Cross-listed as:  


      Prerequisite(s): BIO 211 , BIO 212 .

  
  • BIO 415 Introduction to Neurobiology


    Credit, four hours.
    Students will be introduced to the neuroanatomy and neurophysiology of marine invertebrates and vertebrates. The following aspects of neurobiology will be featured: resting potentials, action potentials, synaptic transmission, neurotransmitters, sensory transduction, muscle innervation, sensorimotor transformations, and neurophysiological bases of behavior. The neuroism program is a package of programs that will help to illustrate basic principles of neurophysiology and neural networks. The program allows a detailed exploration of aspects of cellular neurobiology beyond the level that time and equipment constraints permit in standard laboratory classes. Cross-listed as: MAR 415 . Prerequisite(s): BIO 211 , BIO 212 ;   ; PH 301 . BIO 313  recommended.
  
  • BIO 442 Marine Botany


    Credit, four hours.
    A general survey of marine algae (microscopic and macroscopic), as well as salt marsh vegetation, mangroves, seagrass, and maritime forest communities. Lectures will emphasize identification, distribution, structure, ecology, and physiology. Extensive overnight field and laboratory work is involved, including the ability to wade and snorkel. Participation in overnight field trips is a part of this course. Snorkeling gear is required. Cross-listed as: MAR 442 . Prerequisite(s): BIO 211 , BIO 212 .
  
  • BIO 444 Marine Vertebrate Zoology


    Credit, four hours.
    A survey of marine fishes, reptiles, and mammals, with an in depth, comprehensive treatment of their systematics, zoogeography, and ecology. Lectures will encompass subject matter on a non-regional basis. Field and laboratory work will stress the vertebrate fauna of the northern Gulf of Mexico. Most of the course will be devoted to fishes. Students successfully completing this course will: 1) have a basic understanding of the biology, ecology, physiology, and systematics of the various marine vertebrate taza; 2) gain experience in field and laboratory identification of members of the various marine vertebrate taxa; and 3) gain experience in collecting various marine and island vertebrate taxa. Cross-listed as: MAR 444 . Prerequisite(s): BIO 211 , BIO 212 .
  
  • BIO 445 Marine Invertebrate Zoology


    Credit, four hours
    A study of the natural history, systematics, and morphology of marine invertebrates from a variety of habitats in the Gulf of Mexico, oriented toward a field and laboratory approach. Participation in extended field trips are a part of the course. Cross-listed as: MAR 445 . Prerequisite(s): BIO 211 , BIO 212 .
  
  • BIO 455 Marine Ecology


    Credit, four hours.
    Marine Ecology is an advanced course open to juniors, seniors, and graduate students. Students will study marine organisms as they interact with each other and their environment, and examine theories and the experiential basis of our current knowledge. The laboratory will consist of field trips to a wide variety of marine habitats, and field problems which will be examined by small groups of students. Lecture and laboratory consists of studies of factors influencing population dynamics, community structure, and energy flow in marine ecosystems. Habitats selected for emphasis include coral reefs, kelp forests, seagrass meadows, the rocky intertidal and deep-sea hydrothermal vents. Cross-listed as: MAR 455 . Prerequisite(s): BIO 211 , BIO 212 ; MAR 340 ; recommended.
  
  • BIO 456 Marsh Ecology


    Credit, four hours.
    Marsh ecology is the study of the floral and faunal elements of various coastal and near coastal marsh communities and their interaction with the environment. The course will focus upon the main indicators of marsh wetlands (vegetation, soil, and hydrology), how they interact to form functional wetlands, and how these wetlands are linked to the estuaries and the seas beyond. The course is structured to provide abundant hands-on field experience in methods used to study wetland structure, function, and dynamics. Attention will be given to identification of indicators for the delineation of jurisdictional wetlands according to current federal guidelines. Participation in overnight field trips is part of this course. Cross-listed as: MAR 456 . Prerequisite(s): BIO 211 , BIO 212 ; MAR 340 , MAR 455  recommended; EN 101 , EN 102 .
  
  • BIO 457 Marine Behavioral Ecology


    Credit, four hours.
    The course examines how animal behavior is influenced by and interacts with its environment, and the ecological and evolutionary significance of these behaviors in a marine setting. Students will learn principles of behavioral ecology as they relate to marine animals, become familiar with techniques for observing animal behavior and conducting behavioral experiments, and be introduced to methods for collecting and analyzing behavioral data. The course will consist of lectures, laboratory exercises and experiments, and overnight field trips designed to provide students with the background to pursue additional studies in marine animal behavior. Cross-listed as: MAR 457 . Prerequisite(s): BIO 211 , BIO 212 ; MAR 340 ; recommended.
  
  • BIO 458 Marine Conservation Biology


    Credit, four hours.
    The intent of this course is to develop the students’ understanding of conservation biology by building upon the foundations provided in the introductory marine ecology class. The instructor will provide an introductory lecture designed to present: 1) the historical perspective for the assigned readings, and 2) a brief review of the basic ecological concepts covered in the assigned readings. In addition, field trips will round out the students’ understanding of how current conservation principles are applied in the marine realm. Assigned readings will be selected to cover the widest possible range of topics in marine conservation. In some cases, readings will come from disciplines outside of the marine sciences. Students will be required to develop a topical term paper and give a short presentation to the class on their chosen topics. Cross-listed as: MAR 458 . Prerequisite(s): BIO 211 , BIO 212 ; MAR 340 , BIO 320  or BIO 455 ; EN 101 , EN 102 .

Chemistry

  
  • CH 110 Introduction to Chemistry


    Credit, four hours.
    An introduction to the fundamental concepts of chemistry with practical applications related to environmental issues. This course fulfills one of the laboratory science requirements of the core curriculum. It will not count toward meeting the requirements for chemistry minors. Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory.
  
  • CH 201 General Chemistry I


    Credit, four hours.
    Chemical principles for science majors. Atomic and molecular structure, periodic table, molecules (moles, nonmenclature), types of chemical reactions, stoichemistry, gases, chemical solutions, oxidation/reduction reactions, basic equilibrium. Laboratory exercises will provide experiential learning to reinforce topics taught in CH 201 lecture.  Under normal circumstances CH 201 must precede CH 202. Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory. Corequisite(s): MA 112  or high school algebra.
  
  • CH 202 General Chemistry II


    Credit, four hours.
    The second semester of general chemistry for science majors, building on the fundamentals covered in CH 201, with an emphasis on thermodynamics, kinetics, acids and bases, titrations and an introduction to the fundamentals of Organic Chemistry.  Laboratory exercises will provide experiential learning to reinforce topics taught in CH 202 lecture.  Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in CH 201  
  
  • CH 297 Study in Selected Topics


    Credit, one to six hours.
    Courses offered to provide opportunities for students to study in areas of interest other than those elsewhere defined. This series is primarily a classroom function, either seminar or lecture, permitting flexibility in course offerings.
  
  • CH 298 Study in Selected Topics


    Credit, one to six hours.
    Courses offered to provide opportunities for students to study in areas of interest other than those elsewhere defined. This series is primarily a classroom function, either seminar or lecture, permitting flexibility in course offerings.
  
  • CH 311 Organic Chemistry I


    Credit, four hours.
    For science majors. Organic structures and nomenclature, functional groups, simple organic reactions, stereochemistry, biologically important organic molecules (amines and amino acid, carbohydrates, lipids, proteins), polymers. Laboratory exercises will provide experiential learning to reinforce topics taught in CH 311 lecture. Under normal circumstances, CH 311 must be taken after CH 202. Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in CH 202  
  
  • CH 312 Organic Chemistry II


    Credit, four hours.
    Advanced organic chemistry for science majors, building on the fundamentals covered in CH 311, with an emphasis on reaction mechanisms, spectroscopy, chemistry of aromatic compounds, carbonyl chemistry, and organic synthesis. Laboratory exercises will provide experiential learning to reinforce topics taught in CH 312 lecture. Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory. Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in CH 311  
  
  • CH 317 Analytical Chemistry


    Credit, four hours.
    Analytical chemistry principles for science majors. Quantitative analytical techniques for separation, identification and purification of chemical compounds. Gravimetric analysis titrations, electrochemistry amd spectrochemistry methods. Laboratory exercises will provide experiential learning to reinforce topics taught in CH 317 lecture. Three hours lecture, three hours lab. Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in CH 202  
  
  • CH 346 Hazardous Materials and Toxicology


    Credit, three hours.
    An introduction to hazardous materials and waste, their handling, management, and regulation. The course provides an overview of the chemical characteristics and toxicology of hazardous materials, requirements for risk assessment and communication, personal protection and safety, waste minimization, and environmental remediation. Prerequisite(s):  CH 201 ,  .
  
  • CH 404 Biochemistry


    Credit, three hours.
    The chemistry of biological systems with emphasis on bioenergetics and the important biological molecules, metabolism, synthesis and degradation. Three hours lecture. Cross-listed as: BIO 404 . Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in:

    BIO 211 , BIO 212 ;

      , CH 312 .

  
  • CH 407 Forensic Science


    Credit, four hours.
    The interdisciplinary course will describe the scientific methods behind the forensic analysis of hair, DNA, tool marks, blood, glass, soil, and more. Students will learn these basic concepts and then apply them to evidence collected during various problem-solving and critical-thinking scenarios. This course is designed for upper-level science majors.  Cross-listed as:    Prerequisite(s): BIO 211 , BIO 212 ,  , CH 201 ,  .
  
  • CH 497 Study in Selected Topics


    Credit, one to six hours.
    Courses offered to provide opportunities for students to study in areas of interest other than those elsewhere defined. This series is primarily a classroom function, either seminar or lecture, permitting flexibility in course offerings.
  
  • CH 498 Study in Selected Topics


    Credit, one to six hours.
    Courses offered to provide opportunities for students to study in areas of interest other than those elsewhere defined. This series is primarily a classroom function, either seminar or lecture, permitting flexibility in course offerings.

Christian Studies

  
  • COL 007 Colloquium


    No credit, (S or U)
    In keeping with the stated mission of the institution, the purpose of Colloquium (formally known as Chapel) is to offer students well-planned programs providing for Christian growth and maturation. Required every fall and spring semester for full-time undergraduate students, there is no charge for Colloquium and no academic credit is awarded for it. Registration for COL 007 is necessary in order for students to ensure seating in chapel.
  
  • CST 011 Ministry Team Service


    No Credit (S or U).
    Hands-on experiential learning through ministry activity each semester.  Required for all TL and ICST majors each semester they are enrolled. Freshman year, first semester. 
  
  • CST 101 Introduction to Biblical Theology


    Credit, three hours.
    This course is an introduction to the Bible within a Christian context, surveying its literary, historical, cultural, and theological foundations as special revelation from God. Usually offered every fall semester.
  
  • CST 103 Intercultural Perspectives


    Credit, three hours.
    An introductory study of the World Christian Movement, with particular emphasis on the biblical basis for intercultural ministry. Usually offered every fall semester.
  
  • CST 110 Introduction to Christian Worldview


    Credit, three hours.
    An introduction to Christian worldview, giving special attention to the foundations of historic, orthodox Christian faith, biblical ethics and theology, with application to issues of current interest, such as marriage and family, and citizenship.  Other issues addressed include Christian baptism, prayer, faith-learning integration, and testing of worldviews. Prerequisite(s): None. Usually offered every academic period (semester).
  
  • CST 199 Spiritual Disciplines


    Credit, three hours.
    A foundational study of spiritual disciplines necessary to develop individual, missional, ethical, practical, and leadership skills for Christian ministries.

     

      Usually offered every fall semester.

  
  • CST 201 Introduction to the Old Testament I


    Credit, three hours.
    A survey of the history, literature and theology of the Old Testament with a specific emphasis on the contemporary application of Old Testament teachings. A critical examination of the concept of covenant in the Old Testament will occur throughout the course. A critical analysis of Genesis through Esther will contextualize the broader themes and teachings of the Old Testament from a Christocentric perspective. Usually offered every fall semester.
  
  • CST 202 Introduction to the New Testament I


    Credit, three hours.
    A survey of the New Testament including events in the life of Christ and the development of the early church recorded in the Gospels and the book of Acts. This knowledge and understanding is extended into applications in the life and personal devotions of the learner. Usually offered in the fall. Usually offered every fall semester.
  
  • CST 203 Intercultural Expansion


    Credit, three hours.
    A survey of the international expansion of intercultural ministry since the apostolic age, with special emphasis on history and methodology.  Usually offered every spring semester.
  
  • CST 211 Introduction to the Old Testament II


    Credit, three hours
    A survey of the history, literature and theology of the Old Testament with a specific emphasis on the contemporary application of Old Testament teachings. A critical examination of the concept of covenant in the Old Testament will occur throughout the course. A critical analysis of Job through Malachi will contextualize the broader themes and teachings of the Old Testament from a Christocentric perspective. Usually offered in the spring.
  
  • CST 212 Introduction to the New Testament II


    A survey of the New Testament including events in the life of Christ and the development of the early church recorded in the Epistles and the book of Revelation. This knowledge and understanding is extended into applications in the life and personal devotions of the learner. Usually offered in the spring.
  
  • CST 290 Denominationalism Seminar


    Credit, one hour.
    On denominational soteriology, ecclesiology, baptism, and the Lord’s Supper. Special attention will be given to Roman Catholicism, Anglican, Methodism, Lutheranism, Presbyterianism, Pentecostal denominations, Baptist views and the Church of Christ.
  
  • CST 297 Study in Selected Topics


    Credit, one to six hours.
    Course offered to provide opportunities for competent students to study in areas of interest other than issues elsewhere defined. This series is primarily a classroom function, either seminar or lecture, permitting flexibility in course offerings. Offered as needed.
  
  • CST 298 Study in Selected Topics


    Credit, one to six hours.
    Courses offered to provide opportunities for competent students to study in areas of interest other than issues elsewhere defined. This series is primarily a classroom function, either seminar or lecture, permitting flexibility in course offerings. Offered as needed.
  
  • CST 301 History of Christian Thought


    Credit, three hours.
    A historical study of the way Christians have thought theologically and philosophically from apostolic times to the present. Prerequisite(s): EN 101  and EN 102 . Usually offered every fall semester. (WI)
  
  • CST 303 Intercultural Foundations


    Credit, three hours.
    A survey of personal, cultural, and theological dynamics affecting intercultural and international relations. Personal, family, ethnic, and international relationships are explored through individual and team projects. Usually offered every fall semester. (WI)
 

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