2019-2020 Academic Catalog & Student Handbooks 
    
    May 18, 2024  
2019-2020 Academic Catalog & Student Handbooks [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


Course descriptions are listed alphabetically by subject prefix. Each course description begins with a subject prefix followed by a three-digit course number and the course title. If a course includes laboratory or other special activities, that information is contained in the course description. Prerequisites and co-requisites are also listed. A prerequisite is a course, experience, or other required preparation that must be completed before the student will be permitted to enroll in the course. A co-requisite is a course, experience, or other preparation that must be completed at the same time that the student is enrolled in the listed course.

Courses numbered 100 to 199 are primarily for freshmen, 200 to 299 for sophomores, 300 to 399 for juniors and seniors, and 400 to 499 for seniors. Courses numbered 500 and above are reserved for graduate students.

Please note, when searching courses by “Code or Number”, an asterisk (*) can be used to return mass results. For instance, a “Code or Number” search of ” 5* ” can be entered, returning all 500 or graduate-level courses.

 

Kinesiology

  
  • KIN 410 Exercise Testing and Prescription


    Credit, three hours.
    This course is designed to develop competencies necessary to administer graded exercise tests and prescribe appropriate exercise programs for various populations based upon physiological data. Prerequisite(s): Pre-requisite or con-current KIN 351 Physiology of Exercise .
  
  • KIN 411 Chronic Disease and Disability


    Credits, three hours
    This course is designed to provide a framework for assessing and improving the physical functionality of patients with a variety of chronic diseases and disabilities. 
  
  • KIN 415 Varsity Sports


    Credit, one hour. Maximum credit: three semester hours.
    Participants represent the University of Mobile in baseball, basketball, cross country, track and field, golf, tennis, softball, soccer, volleyball, and cheerleading. Participation is limited to qualified team members.
  
  • KIN 421 Research in Kinesiology


    Credit, three hours.
    Acquaints the student with the various types of research in the areas of health education, physical education, exercise science, and sports. Special emphasis will be placed on experimental research. Prerequisite(s): MA 211 . (WI)
  
  • KIN 422 Capstone Project


    Credit, three hours.
    This course will stand as the culminating research experience for the Level IV ATEP students in terms of final preparations for the BOC Exam by completing BOC online practice exams and assessing areas of weakness based on Practice Analysis Domains as well as practice completing comprehensive exams on all areas covered in the ATEP and correlating these with the Role Delineation Study and the Athletic Training Education Competencies.

    This course will also provide the ATEP students the opportunity to do an applied research project and present a final document containing all five chapters of their research project. Prerequisite(s): KIN 421 , Level IV ATEP and in good standing with UMobile ATEP.

  
  • KIN 425 Athletic Training Clinical Experience V


    Credit, two hours.
    This course is designed to increase the athletic training student’s level of confidence in dealing with all aspects of the athletic training profession while under the direct supervision of the clinical supervisor (Preceptors). Emphases in this course include pre-season and post season programs and the therapeutic modality usage in an athletic healthcare setting. Prerequisite(s): Must be admitted into the Athletic Training Education Program.
  
  • KIN 426 Athletic Training Clinical Experience VI


    Credit, two hours.
    This course is designed to be the culminating experience of the athletic training students didactic and clinical education program. The emphases in the course are on total review/tutorial of the didactic and clinical education program and preparation for the BOC Certification Exam. Under the direct supervision of the clinical supervisor (Preceptors). Prerequisite(s): Must be admitted into the Athletic Training Education Program major.
  
  • KIN 431 Independent Study


    Maximum credit, eight hours.
    A student with advanced standing may pursue an independent study or research project in the major area, with the approval of the advisor, instructor, and dean of the School of Health and Sports Science. Prerequisite(s): Completion of at least eighteen semester hours with a 3.00 GPA or higher in the major. (See contract for requirements and details.)
  
  • KIN 432 Independent Study


    Maximum credit, eight hours.
    A student with advanced standing may pursue an independent study or research project in the major area, with the approval of the advisor, instructor, and dean of the School of Health and Sports Science. Prerequisite(s): Completion of at least eighteen semester hours with a 3.00 GPA or higher in the major. (See contract for requirements and details.)
  
  • KIN 497 Study in Selected Topics


    Credit, one to six hours.
    Courses offered to provide opportunities for competent students to study in areas of interest other than those elsewhere defined. This series is primarily a classroom function, either seminar or lecture, permitting flexibility in course offerings.
  
  • KIN 498 Study in Selected Topics


    Credit, one to six hours.
    Courses offered to provide opportunities for competent students to study in areas of interest other than those elsewhere defined. This series is primarily a classroom function, either seminar or lecture, permitting flexibility in course offerings.

Latin

  
  • LT 201 Elementary Latin I


    Three hours
    Latin grammar and syntax with some emphasis on the historical background of the language and the principles of word-formation.  Reading of simple texts.  Usually offered in fall.
  
  • LT 202 Elementary Latin II


    Credit, three hours
    A continuation of Latin grammar and syntax with some more emphasis on reading simple texts.  Prerequisite(s): LT 201   Usually offered in spring.
  
  • LT 301 Intermediate Latin I


    Credit, three hours.
    Roman Prose and Poetry. Selected readings of Roman prose writers, primarily Cicero, and Catullus, Virgil and Ovid. Prerequisite(s): LT 201   and LT 202  

Leadership and Cultural Studies

  
  • HI 415 Leadership and Crisis


    Credit, three hours.
    An examination of the nature of cultural crisis and the responses of key figures to crises at certain points in the history of western civilization.

Mathematics

  
  • MA 101 Pre-Algebra


    Credit, three hours.
    A study of basic arithmetic operations and algorithms, including the development of a number system. This course cannot be counted toward a major or a minor in mathematics and will not fulfill the core requirement for mathematics.
  
  • MA 102 Elementary Algebra


    Credit, three hours.
    A study of basic algebra including addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division of algebraic expressions; factorization; the quadratic formula; and the solution of algebraic equations. This course cannot be counted toward a major or a minor in mathematics.
  
  • MA 107 Structure of Mathematics


    Credit, three hours.
    A study of the structure of mathematics through the developments of the concept of numbers and mathematical systems. An introduction to mathematical thought, rather than development of techniques. Intended for non-science majors. Not a prerequisite for other mathematics courses; not applicable toward a major or minor in mathematics.
  
  • MA 110 Intermediate Algebra


    Credit, three hours.
    A course dealing with the fundamental concepts and operations of algebra. This course cannot be counted toward a major or minor in mathematics. Prerequisite(s): Competency in one year of high school algebra.
  
  • MA 112 Precalculus Algebra


    Credit, three hours.
    A course dealing with the algebra of functions including polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions. The course also covers systems of equations and inequalities, and quadratic inequalities. Prerequisite(s): Competency in two years of high school algebra.
  
  • MA 113 Trigonometry


    Credit, three hours.
    Functions, angles, circular functions, graphs, identities, equations, and inverse functions. Prerequisite(s): High school geometry and MA 112  or equivalent.
  
  • MA 117 Finite Mathematics


    Credit, three hours.
    This course is intended to give an overview of topics in finite mathematics together with their applications, and is taken primarily by students who are not majoring in science, engineering, commerce, or mathematics (i.e., students who are not required to take calculus). This course will draw on and significantly enhance the student’s arithmetic and algebra skills. The course includes sets, counting, permutations, combinations, basic probability, (including Bayes’ Theorem), an introduction to statistics (including work with binomial distributions and normal distributions), and matrices and their applications to Markov chains and decision theory.
  
  • MA 201 Calculus with Analytic Geometry I


    Credit, five hours.
    Introduction to analytic geometry, functions, limits, derivatives with applications, and antiderivatives.
  
  • MA 202 Calculus with Analytic Geometry II


    Credit, five hours.
    Integrals; exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions; and applications of calculus. Prerequisite(s): MA 201 .
  
  • MA 211 Elementary Statistics


    Credit, three hours.
    Measures of central tendency and variability, probability distributions, confidence intervals, correlation, tests of significance, and chi-squares.
  
  • MA 297 Study in Selected Topics


    Credit, one to ten hours.
    Courses offered to provide competent students with an opportunity to study in areas of interest other than those elsewhere defined. This series is primarily a classroom function, either seminar or lecture, permitting flexibility in course offerings. Prerequisite(s): MA 112  or equivalent.
  
  • MA 298 Study in Selected Topics


    Credit, one to ten hours.
    Courses offered to provide competent students with an opportunity to study in areas of interest other than those elsewhere defined. This series is primarily a classroom function, either seminar or lecture, permitting flexibility in course offerings. Prerequisite(s): MA 112  or equivalent.
  
  • MA 303 Intermediate Calculus


    Credit, five hours.
    Basic properties of differential and continuous functions, differentiation and integration of special functions, polar coordinates, indeterminate forms, improper integrals, parametric curves, vectors, and multiple integrals. Prerequisite(s): MA 202 .
  
  • MA 304 Differential Equations


    Credit, three hours.
    Covers the solution of ordinary differential equations with applications in geometry, chemistry, and physics. Prerequisite(s): MA 202 .
  
  • MA 307 Foundations of Mathematics


    Credit, three hours.
    A study of set theory, logic, mathematical induction and the arithmetic of cardinal numbers. Prerequisite(s): MA 201  or permission of the instructor. (OC and WI)
  
  • MA 311 Linear Algebra


    Credit, three hours.
    Vector spaces, matrices, determinants, and linear transforms. Prerequisite(s): MA 201  or permission of the instructor.
  
  • MA 312 Modern Algebra


    Credit, three hours.
    A study of abstract algebraic structures, groups, isomorphisms, and homomorphisms. Prerequisite(s): MA 307  or permission of the instructor.
  
  • MA 315 Number Theory


    Credit, three hours.
    An introduction to the theory of numbers, integers, Diophantine equations, linear congruences, the Chinese remainder theorem, and continued fractions. Prerequisite(s): MA 307  or permission of the instructor.
  
  • MA 390 Capstone for Teacher Certification


    Credit, one hour.
    This course provides a capstone experience exclusively for students majoring in mathematics with teacher certification. The course will focus on specific problems for mathematics teachers.
      Prerequisite(s): Junior standing with a major in mathematics with teacher certification.
  
  • MA 403 Mathematical Analysis


    Credit, three hours.
    An introduction to real analysis with optional inclusion of topics of numerical analysis and complex analysis. Prerequisite(s): MA 202  and MA 307 .
  
  • MA 404 Mathematical Analysis


    Credit, three hours.
    An introduction to real analysis with optional inclusion of topics of numerical analysis and complex analysis. Prerequisite(s): MA 202  and MA 307 .
  
  • MA 405 Vector Analysis


    Credit, three hours.
    Vector algebra and vector calculus, with applications to physics, mechanics, and geometry. Prerequisite(s): MA 202 .
  
  • MA 407 Applied Mathematics


    Credit, three hours.
    A study of selected topics in Applied Mathematics including scientific computing, numerical methods, and engineering applications.
  
  • MA 408 Probability


    Credit, three hours.
    A study of probability including permutations, combinations, and the binomial theorem. Prerequisite(s): MA 201  or permission of the instructor.
  
  • MA 410 General Topology


    Credit, three hours.
    A study of topological spaces, separation properties, compact sets, connected sets, and product spaces. Prerequisite(s): MA 307  or permission of the instructor.
  
  • MA 431 Independent Study


    Maximum credit, eight hours.
    Courses to provide opportunities for students with advanced standing to pursue an independent study or research project in the major area, with the approval of the advisor, instructor, and dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. Prerequisite(s): Completion of at least eighteen semester hours with a 3.00 GPA or higher in the major. (See independent study contract for requirements and details.)
  
  • MA 432 Independent Study


    Maximum credit, eight hours.
    Courses to provide opportunities for students with advanced standing to pursue an independent study or research project in the major area, with the approval of the advisor, instructor, and dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. Prerequisite(s): Completion of at least eighteen semester hours with a 3.00 GPA or higher in the major. (See independent study contract for requirements and details.)
  
  • MA 480 Financial Mathematics


    Credit, three hours.
    The purpose of this class is to expose undergraduate students to the mathematical concepts and techniques used in the financial industry. (WI)
  
  • MA 496 Mathematical Communication and Technology


    Credit, three hours.
    Techniques of oral, written, and electronic communication of mathematics; software includes LaTeX, MetaPost, Maxima, and Octave. Prerequisite(s): Approval of instructor.
  
  • MA 497 Study in Selected Topics


    Credit, one to ten hours.
    Courses offered to provide competent students with an opportunity to study in areas of interest other than those elsewhere defined. This series is primarily a classroom function, either seminar or lecture, permitting flexibility in course offerings.
  
  • MA 498 Study in Selected Topics


    Credit, one to ten hours.
    Courses offered to provide competent students with an opportunity to study in areas of interest other than those elsewhere defined. This series is primarily a classroom function, either seminar or lecture, permitting flexibility in course offerings.

Marine Science

  
  • MAR 103 Introduction to Marine Science


    Credit, four hours.
    An introduction to a variety of topics in biological, chemical, and physical marine science. This course is designed for students who are not majoring in marine science but who have an interest in learning more about the marine environment. It fulfills one of the laboratory science requirements of the University’s basic course requirements but will not satisfy the requirements for a marine science major or minor. Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory. Cross-listed as: BIO 103 .
  
  • MAR 340 Marine Biology


    Credit, four hours.
    A general survey of marine plants, invertebrates, and vertebrates, the communities they form, and the physical and chemical factors that influence them. Field trips to marsh and beach habitats, sampling from research vessels, and laboratory exercises serve to introduce students to the diversity of marine habitats and organisms. Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory. Cross-listed as: BIO 340 . Prerequisite(s): BIO 211 , BIO 212 ; MA 112   
  
  • MAR 408 Science and Ethics


    Credit, three hours.
    A study of the foundations for moral reflection, including a consideration of scientific issues in the light of these truths. Cross-listed as: BIO 408 . Prerequisite(s): Upper level standing/Instructor approval.
  
  • MAR 431 Independent Study


    Maximum credit, six hours.
    Courses offered for students to pursue an independent research project in the major. Consent of instructor, advisor, and dean of the College of Arts and Sciences required. Prerequisite(s): Completion of at least eighteen semester hours with 3.00 GPA or higher in major.
  
  • MAR 432 Independent Study


    Maximum credit, six hours.
    Courses offered for students to pursue an independent research project in the major. Consent of instructor, advisor, and dean of the College of Arts and Sciences required. Prerequisite(s): Completion of at least eighteen semester hours with 3.00 GPA or higher in major.
  
  • MAR 490 Marine Science Capstone


    Credit, three hours.
    This course provides a capstone experience consisting of a comprehensive review and integrated examination of important concepts taken from required BIO/CH/MAR courses within the curriculum. Cross-listed as:   Prerequisite(s): Senior standing with a major in biology, marine science, or environmental management. (WI)
  
  • MAR 497 Study in Selected Topics


    Credit, one to six hours.
    Courses offered to provide opportunities for competent students to study in areas of interest other than those defined elsewhere. Also offered at DISL.
  
  • MAR 498 Study in Selected Topics


    Credit, one to six hours.
    Courses offered to provide opportunities for competent students to study in areas of interest other than those defined elsewhere. Also offered at DISL.

Marine Science (Dauphin Island Sea Lab Only)

  
  • MAR 212 Hurricanes of the Gulf Coast


    Credit, two hours.
    A study of the controlling factors and features of the world’s climates, with particular attention to coastal areas, and application and interpretation of climate data.
  
  • MAR 220 Dolphins and Whales


    Credit, two hours.
    This course is to enable the student to make rapid, accurate, and thoughtful use of a customized reference file and laboratory and field notes to respond to questions about the classification, anatomy, and ecology of members of the order Cetacea and of the Sirenian genus Trichechus (manatee). Such topics include discussion of the people and places that have been involved in the studies. This course will consist of lectures supported by audiovisual materials and practical exercises in the laboratory of the standing network (Mobile) and on vessel-based and land-based platforms. Rather than being reading, writing, or memory intensive, the activities of the student will be more nearly project intensive, with emphasis on construction of a reference file and organization of records of the laboratory and field observations. Cross-listed as:  . Prerequisite(s): BIO 211 , BIO 212 .
  
  • MAR 270 Marine Aquaculture


    Credit, two hours.
    This course will introduce students to techniques in marine aquaculture with emphasis in the areas of nutrition and feeding, reproductive biology, production techniques, water quality requirements, processing, marketing, and economics of commercially important marine aquaculture species. This course is also designed to assist students in developing their problem solving and communication skills. Prerequisite(s): BIO 211 , BIO 212 ; MAR 444 , MAR 445  recommended.
  
  • MAR 350 Marine Geology


    Credit, four hours.
    A study of the geology of the ocean basins, with special emphasis on the continental shelves, their sediments, and the sedimentary processes at work there (emphasis on the Northeast Gulf of Mexico). Students will be introduced to thefollowing skills: technical writing, conduction of a research project, working as a team member, data management, concepts of marine geology, critical thinking, and principles of science (hypothesis testing). Prerequisite(s): ES 101  recommended.
  
  • MAR 360 Introduction to Oceanography


    Credit, four hours.
    A general introduction to the physics, chemistry, geology, and biology of the ocean. This course serves to introduce the student to the interrelationships between physical, geological, chemical, and biological processes in the ocean. Field trips in Mobile Bay and near-coastal Gulf of Mexico serve to introduce students to research techniques and oceanographic processes in the region. Prerequisite(s): BIO 211 , BIO 212 ;  ,  ; PH 301 ,  .
  
  • MAR 415 Introduction to Neurobiology


    Credit, four hours.
    Students will be introduced to the neuroanatomy and neurophysiology of marine invertebrates and vertebrates. The following aspects of neurobiology will be featured: resting potentials, action potentials, synaptic transmission, neurotransmitters, sensory transduction, muscle innervation, sensorimotor transformations, and neurophysiological bases of behavior. The neurosim program is a package of programs that will help to illustrate basic principles of neurophysiology and neural networks. The program allows a detailed exploration of aspects of cellular neurobiology beyond the level that time and equipment constraints permit in standard laboratory classes. Cross-listed as: BIO 415 . Prerequisite(s): BIO 211 , BIO 212 ;  ,  ; PH 301 BIO 313  recommended.
  
  • MAR 440 Coastal Birds of Alabama


    Credit, two hours.
    This course is an introductory level course to coastal avian fauna. This course includes identification, population dynamics and behavior of coastal birds. This course is a field-based course with an emphasis on breeding biology and behavior and introduction to bird identification. Prerequisite(s): BIO 211 , BIO 212 . MAR 340 /BIO 340  recommended.
  
  • MAR 442 Marine Botany


    Credit, four hours.
    A general survey of marine algae (microscopic and macroscopic), as well as salt marsh vegetation, mangroves, seagrass, and maritime forest communities. Lectures will emphasize identification, distribution, structure, ecology, and physiology. Extensive overnight field and laboratory work is involved, including the ability to wade and snorkel. Participation in overnight field trips is a part of this course. Snorkeling gear is required. Cross-listed as: BIO 442 . Prerequisite(s): BIO 211 , BIO 212 .
  
  • MAR 444 Marine Vertebrate Zoology


    Credit, four hours.
    A survey of marine fishes, reptiles, and mammals, with an in-depth, comprehensive treatment of their systematics, zoogeography, and ecology. Lectures will encompass subject matter on a non-regional basis. Field and laboratory work will stress the vertebrate fauna of the northern Gulf of Mexico. Most of the course will be devoted to fishes. Students successfully completing this course will: 1) have a basic understanding of the biology, ecology, physiology, and systematics of the various marine vertebrate taxa; 2) gain experience in field and laboratory identification of members of the various marine vertebrate taxa; and 3) gain experience in collecting various marine and island vertebrate taxa. Cross-listed as: BIO 444 . Prerequisite(s): BIO 211 , BIO 212 .
  
  • MAR 445 Marine Invertebrate Zoology


    Credit, four hours.
    A study of the natural history, systematics, and morphology of marine invertebrates from a variety of habitats in the Gulf of Mexico, oriented toward a field and laboratory approach. Participation in extended field trips are a part of the course. Cross-listed as: BIO 445  Prerequisite(s): BIO 211 , BIO 212 .
  
  • MAR 455 Marine Ecology


    Credit, four hours.
    Marine Ecology is an advanced course open to juniors, seniors, and graduate students. Students will study marine organisms as they interact with each other and their environment, and examine theories and the experimental basis of our current knowledge. The laboratory will consist of field trips to a wide variety of marine habitats, and field problems which will be examined by small groups of students. Lecture and laboratory consists of studies of factors influencing population dynamics, community structure, and energy flow in marine ecosystems. Habitats selected for emphasis include coral reefs, kelp forests, seagrass meadows, the rocky intertidal and deep-sea hydrothermal vents. Cross-listed as: BIO 455 . Prerequisite(s): BIO 211 , BIO 212 ; MAR 340  recommended.
  
  • MAR 456 Marsh Ecology


    Credit, four hours.
    Marsh ecology is the study of the floral and faunal elements of various coastal and near-coastal marsh communities and their interaction with the environment. The course will focus upon the main indicators of marsh wetlands (vegetation, soil, and hydrology), how they interact to form functional wetlands, and how these wetlands are linked to the estuaries and the seas beyond. The course is structured to provide abundant hands-on field experience in methods used to study wetland structure, function, and dynamics. Attention will be given to identification of indicators for the delineation of jurisdictional wetlands according to current federal guidelines. Participation in overnight field trips is part of this course. Cross-listed as: BIO 456 . Prerequisite(s): BIO 211 , BIO 212 ; MAR 340 , MAR 455  recommended.
  
  • MAR 457 Marine Behavioral Ecology


    Credit, four hours.
    The course examines how animal behavior in influenced by and interacts with its environment, and the ecological and evolutionary significance of these behaviors in a marine setting. Students will learn principles of behavioral ecology as they relate to marine animals, become familiar with techniques for observing animal behavior and conducting behavioral experiments, and be introduced to methods for collecting and analyzing behavioral data. The course will consist of lectures, laboratory exercises and experiments, and overnight field trips designed to provide students with the background to pursue additional studies in marine animal behavior. Cross-listed as: BIO 457 . Prerequisite(s): BIO 211 , BIO 212 ; MAR 340  recommended.
  
  • MAR 458 Marine Conservation Biology


    Credit, four hours.
    The intent of this course is to develop the students’ understanding of conservation biology by building upon the foundations provided in the introductory marine ecology class. The instructor will provide an introductory lecture designed to present: 1) the historical perspective for the assigned readings, and 2) a brief review of the basic ecological concepts covered in the assigned readings. In addition, field trips will round out the students’ understanding of how current conservation principles are applied in the marine realm. Assigned readings will be selected to cover the widest possible range of topics in marine conservation. In some cases, readings will come from disciplines outside of the marine sciences. Students will be required to develop a topical term paper and give a short presentation to the class on their chosen topics. Cross-listed as: BIO 458 . Prerequisite(s): BIO 211 , BIO 212 ; MAR 340 ; BIO 320  or MAR 455 .
  
  • MAR 462 Coastal Geomorphology


    Credit, two hours.
    This course is an introduction to coastal sediment processes and applied coastal geomorphology with emphasis on waves, tides, sediments, and their interactions including the impacts of anthropogenic influences.
  
  • MAR 483 Coastal Zone Management


    Credit, two hours.
    A review of ecological features and management policies for coastal communities with a description of relevant federal and state programs. This introductory level course examines the various aspects of coastal zone management in the United States by: 1) examining the major substantive and procedural aspects of specific laws and regulations which govern activity in the coastal zone environment and processes; and 2) examining how coastal environments and processes affect specific management issues of the zone.

Marriage and Family Counseling

  
  • MFC 540 Foundations of Counseling


    Credit, three hours.
    Examines basic counseling theories as well as the history of counseling. The course is designed to give students foundational work in the field of counseling for future application.
  
  • MFC 542 Mental Disorders: Assessment, Diagnosis, and Treatment


    Credit, three hours.
    This course studies the development, diagnosis, and treatment of mental disorders in individual and family systems.  This course acquaints the student with current systems of classifying mental disorders and their use.
  
  • MFC 544 Individual and Family Development


    Credit, three hours.
    Introduces students to theories of individual and family development across the lifespan with particular attention to childhood and adolescence and the development of the brain. Emphasizes the interaction of personality, systems, gender, culture, and spirituality with development and how these affect clinical presentation and treatment.
  
  • MFC 545 Group Counseling


    Credit, three hours.
    Surveys the theories and processes of group counseling.
  
  • MFC 546 Testing and Measurement


    Credit, three hours.
    Provides the student with an understanding of foundational concepts in the field of psychological testing and measurement and the application of those concepts to the process of counseling. Acquaints the student with selected testing instruments.
  
  • MFC 547 Career Counseling


    Credit, three hours.
    Studies the theories, methods, and materials of career counseling.
  
  • MFC 549 Human Sexuality and Counseling


    Credit, three hours.
    Examines human sexuality in theological, lifespan, and multicultural contexts as well as integrative treatment approaches for sexual issues.
  
  • MFC 550 Sociology of the Family


    Credit, three hours.
    Studies the family and its structure in relation to current social and cultural influences.
  
  • MFC 551 Family Systems Theories and Therapies


    Credit, three hours.
    Examines the historical development, theoretical and empirical foundations, and the contemporary conceptual directions of the field of marriage and family therapy. Various systems approaches are surveyed and guidelines for conducting marriage and family therapy are studied.
  
  • MFC 554 Marriage and Family Counseling I


    Credit, three hours.
    Studies the theories and techniques of the structural, strategic, solution-focused, and cognitive-behavioral approaches to family counseling. Practical application is made to family case studies.
  
  • MFC 555 Marriage and Family Counseling II


    Credit, three hours.
    Studies the theories and techniques of the intergenerational, experiential, and object relations approaches to family counseling. Practical application is made to the student’s family development, as well as to family case studies.
  
  • MFC 556 Couples Therapy


    Credit, three hours.
    Studies selected systemic approaches to and techniques of counseling couples.
  
  • MFC 565 Research Techniques and Data Analysis In MFC


    Credit, three hours.
    Studies basic statistical measures, research methods and data analysis as related to the practice of marriage and family counseling.
  
  • MFC 571 Ethical, Legal, and Professional Issues in Marriage and Family Counseling


    Credit, three hours.
    Examines the role of the Marriage and Family Counselor as a professional relating to standards of practice, professional organizations, and ethical and legal codes.
  
  • MFC 575 Special Topics In Marriage and Family Counseling


    Credit, three hours.
    Analyzes special topics in marriage and family counseling. Designed to meet specific needs and special interests and to explore current issues in the field. With permission of advisor only, this course may be repeated when content changes.
  
  • MFC 578 Marriage and Family Counseling Practicum I


    Credit, three hours.
    Provides student weekly individual and group supervision as well as guided individual study in the observation and practice of marriage and family counseling. A minimum of 50 contact hours with individuals, couples, groups and families are required. The student will work with a faculty advisor to determine the appropriate time and place for Practicum I.
  
  • MFC 579 Marriage and Family Counseling Practicum II


    Credit, three hours.
    Provides a continuation of supervised practice and individual guided study for an additional 50 contact hours of direct service to individuals, couples, groups and families. Prerequisite(s): MFC 578 .
  
  • MFC 582 Marriage and Family Counseling Internship I


    Credit, three hours.
    Provides student weekly individual and group supervision while student performs all the activities that a regularly employed Marriage and Family Counselor would be expected to perform. For those students pursuing the Licensed Professional Counselor credential, this course begins their accrual of the 600 clock hours (at least 240 of which must be direct service to individuals, couples, families, and/or groups) required for internship. Prerequisite(s): MFC 579 and special permission of the instructor.
  
  • MFC 583 Marriage and Family Counseling Internship II


    Credit, three hours.
    Provides student weekly individual and group supervision while student performs all the activities that a regularly employed Marriage and Family Counselor would be expected to perform. For those students pursuing the Licensed Professional Counselor credential, this course completes their accrual of the 600 clock hours (at least 240 of which must be direct service to individuals, couples, families, and/or groups) required for internship. Prerequisite(s): MFC 582 and special permission of the instructor. May be repeated.
  
  • MFC 595 Independent Study and Research In Marriage and Family Counseling


    Credit, three hours.
    Provides an opportunity for students to explore through directed readings and research those problems and issues of special significance in the field of marriage and family counseling.
  
  • MFC 599 MFC Comprehensive Examination


    Credit, none (no hours).
    A comprehensive examination over the student’s course work. The examination may be written or oral or both (at the option of the MFC Faculty).

Management

  
  • MGT 313 Retail Management


    Credit, three hours.
    A study of the retail management decision process, and involves developing and evaluating a retail strategy in a variety of retail institutions. Cross-listed as: MKT 313 . Prerequisite(s): MKT 311 . (WI)
  
  • MGT 321 Principles of Management


    Credit, three hours.
    A study of the theory and practice of management as a universal discipline applicable to all areas of human endeavor. Emphases are on managerial functions and organizational structure. This course is a prerequisite for all other courses in management.
  
  • MGT 322 Human Resource Management


    Credit, three hours.
    This course is a study of the relationships of individual workers to their work environments. Includes personnel management, labor relations, and labor legislation. Prerequisite(s): MGT 321 .
  
  • MGT 323 Supervisory Management


    Credit, three hours.
    This course emphasizes the essential differences between managers and non-managers and the differences between supervisory managers and higher-level managers. Supervisory managers are those in first-level and middle-levels of management, as opposed to those in top management (central management). Prerequisite(s): MGT 321 .
  
  • MGT 331 Internships


    Credit, three hours.
    Qualified students who have satisfactorily completed BA 151 , MGT 321 , and three hours of management coursework may be placed in internships for at least 135 hours of supervised professional experience. Grades are either Pass or Fail.
  
  • MGT 332 Internships


    Credit, three hours.
    Qualified students who have satisfactorily completed BA 151 , MGT 321 , and three hours of management coursework may be placed in internships for at least 135 hours of supervised professional experience. Grades are either Pass or Fail.
  
  • MGT 333 Leadership in Organizations


    Credit, three hours.
    A basic study of the theory and practice of leadership in organizations. The course focuses on managerial leadership and presents a broad survey of the current theories and research on leadership in formal organizations. Topics will include ethics, motivation, the use and abuse of power and privilege, leadership in teams, transactional and transformational leadership, and servant leadership.
  
  • MGT 351 Enactus I


    Credit, three hours.
    The purpose of this course is to establish and direct student-generated appreciation for the free-enterprise system through outreach projects within the community. SIFE is an international non-profit organization that brings together top leaders of today and tomorrow to create a better, more sustainable world through the positive power of business. Through projects that improve quality of life and standard of living for people in the community, the students and instructors demonstrate that individuals with a knowledge and passion for business can be a powerful force for change. This is the first of a two-course sequence. Cross-listed as: BA 351 . Prerequisite(s): BA 151 , EC 201 , and permission of instructor.
  
  • MGT 352 Enactus II


    Credit, three hours.
    This is a continuation of MGT 351  to prepare and present the SIFE projects. Presentations will be given at regional and national competitions. Cross-listed as: BA 352 . Prerequisite(s): BA 151 , EC 201  and permission of instructor.
 

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