2019-2020 Academic Catalog & Student Handbooks 
    
    May 18, 2024  
2019-2020 Academic Catalog & Student Handbooks [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


Course descriptions are listed alphabetically by subject prefix. Each course description begins with a subject prefix followed by a three-digit course number and the course title. If a course includes laboratory or other special activities, that information is contained in the course description. Prerequisites and co-requisites are also listed. A prerequisite is a course, experience, or other required preparation that must be completed before the student will be permitted to enroll in the course. A co-requisite is a course, experience, or other preparation that must be completed at the same time that the student is enrolled in the listed course.

Courses numbered 100 to 199 are primarily for freshmen, 200 to 299 for sophomores, 300 to 399 for juniors and seniors, and 400 to 499 for seniors. Courses numbered 500 and above are reserved for graduate students.

Please note, when searching courses by “Code or Number”, an asterisk (*) can be used to return mass results. For instance, a “Code or Number” search of ” 5* ” can be entered, returning all 500 or graduate-level courses.

 

Nursing

  
  • NU 595 Comprehensive Examination


    Credit, none (no hours).
    The comprehensive examination will cover materials in the curriculum with emphasis on the content of courses within the nursing major. Corequisite(s): It consists of a written examination and is graded as either a “Pass” or “Fail”.
  
  • NU 598 Research Project


    Credit, three hours.
    Provides the opportunity for an individual or small group of students to plan, conduct, and report an in-depth research study utilizing appropriate research methodology with the guidance and approval of a graduate faculty advisor. Prerequisite(s): NU 504 .
  
  • NU 599 Thesis


    Credit, three hours.
    Provides the opportunity for a student to plan, conduct, and report an individualized in-depth research study utilizing appropriate research methodology with the guidance and approval of a three-member graduate faculty committee. Prerequisite(s): NU 504 .
  
  • NU 610 Family Nurse Practitioner III: Care of Adults II


    Credit, six hours.
    This course focuses on the theoretical and clinical foundation of advanced practice nursing management of health promotion, prevention, diagnosis and management of acute and chronic health care problems common to adult patients. Students utilize clinical practice guidelines to ensure safe evidence-based care. Interdisciplinary collaboration among health care providers is promoted. Extensive clinical experiences are provided in various acute and community-based settings to prepare the student to assume the role and professional responsibilities of the entry level family nurse practitioner (160 clinical hours).
  
  • NU 612 Family Nurse Practitioner III: Care of Women


    Credit, three hours
    This course focuses on the theoretical and clinical foundation of advanced practice nursing management of health promotion, prevention, diagnosis and management of acute and chronic health care problems common to women with a focus on the childbearing patient. Students utilize clinical practice guidelines to ensure safe evidenced based care. Interdisciplinary collaboration among health care providers is promoted. Extensive clinical experiences are provided in a variety of patient care settings to prepare the student to assume the role and professional responsibilities of the entry level family nurse practitioner (80 clinical hours). Prerequisite(s): NU 501  , NU 511  , NU 524  . Corequisite(s): NU 613  , NU 525  , NU 626  .
  
  • NU 613 Specialty Focus Practicum


    Credit, two hours.
    This course is designed for the Advanced Practice Nurse to work in a clinical setting of their choice and enhance advanced clinical practice under the supervision of an advanced practice nurse as a role model (80 clinical hours). Prerequisite(s): NU 501  , NU 511  , NU 524  . Corequisite(s): NU 612  , NU 525  , NU 626  .
  
  • NU 619 Organizational Leadership and Health Policy for Advanced Nursing Practice


    Credit, two hours.
    This course will focus on the systematic collection of information about the activities, characteristics and outcomes of programs to improve health care and inform future programmatic decisions. Key policy issues and core constructs for analysis include national health expenditures and cost containment strategies, patient access and cost containment strategies, patient access and health disparities, health care reform, future direction and trends and policy innovations will be examined for their impact on advanced practice, service delivery and health outcomes. This course prepares the advanced nursing professional to respond to current realities and provide enhanced leadership for future policy development and professional practice. Prerequisite(s): NU 506  , NU 507  , NU 508  , NU 509  . Corequisite(s): NU 504  , NU 510  , NU 528  .
  
  • NU 626 Transitions to Advanced Nursing Practice


    Credit, one hour.
    Emphasis will be placed on professional topics such as reimbursement, licensure and credentials, prescriptive privileges, securing employment, certification exam preparation and portfolio preparation. Prerequisite(s): NU 501  , NU 511  , NU 524  . Corequisite(s): NU 612  , NU 613  , NU 525  .
  
  • NU 701 Scholarly Foundations for Advanced Practice


    Credit, three hours.
    This course examines advanced nursing practice roles, both from a historical view and in current practice, as well as explores roles using philosophical, political, economic, and legal frameworks. Emphasis is placed on examination of current social, professional, legislative, and technological trends in health care, as they relate to advanced practice nursing. The focus will be on encouraging the student to develop the requisite skills needed for role assumption and leadership within the health care delivery system through engagement in activities designed to develop role competencies in advanced nursing practice.
  
  • NU 702 Health Information Systems


    Credit, three hours.
    This course provides an in-depth evaluation of various health information systems, with emphasis on case studies of systems utilized in areas such as patient-care, clinical decision-support, disease and demographic surveillance, imaging and simulation, and safety and environmental assessment. Fundamentals of proposing, reporting, and refereeing evaluation studies are covered. Utilization of a statistical software and comparison of EHR programs. Legal and ethical issues related to training, security, confidentiality, and the use of informed consent are discussed.
  
  • NU 703 Project Development


    Credit, four hours.
    This course is a faculty guided course in which the student will develop a scholarly project topic based on an area of interest. In this course students will develop an abstract, problem statement, evidence review plan, and evaluation plan.
  
  • NU 705 Faith and Science


    Credit, two hours.
    The philosophical underpinnings of the Christian worldview as it applies to faith and science in the arena of health care. An understanding of faith as the basis for hope and humanity in delivering quality health care will be discussed while incorporating the quantitative analysis of scientific principles.
  
  • NU 708 Epidemiology


    Credit, three hours.
    This course covers the principles and methods of epidemiologic investigation including describing the patterns of illness in populations and research designs for investigating the etiology of disease.  Introduces quantitative measures to determine risk, association and procedures for standardization of rates. Topics include the development of research questions; overview of epidemiologic study designs; sampling, sample size, and selection bias; techniques for data collection, sources of secondary data and the evaluation of measurement and information bias; confounding and effect modification; techniques for simple and stratified analyses; and an introduction to mathematical modeling in epidemiology.
  
  • NU 710 Clinical Scholarship in Evidence-Based Practice


    Credit, three hours.
    This course emphasizes the conceptual understanding of research design and methods and measurements commonly used in research.  Application of research methods and design, principles of measurement, and use of statistics in order to contribute to improved clinical decisions and outcomes. The use of statistical techniques as well as how to apply and interpret the results.
  
  • NU 712 Organizational Leadership


    Credit, three hours.
    This course will provide analyses of the theory, practice, context, content, skills, and processes relating to individual, organizational and global leadership. The evolving roles in health care systems are explored. An emphasis is placed on the role of the advanced practice nurse leader in relationship to innovative and strategic leadership approaches to change, managing outcomes, conflict, ethical and legal decisions, human and physical resources, and quality improvements.
  
  • NU 729 Preventative Care for Populations


    Credit, three hours.
    This course introduces role of assessment in planning for community health improvement through health promotion activities.  Considers determinants of health; methods to find, collect, and analyze quantitative and qualitative data; interprets findings to describe the health resources, risks, and outcomes; role of assessment in identifying health disparities and patterns of health inequities.
  
  • NU 731 Leadership Experiences in Nursing (Optional)


    Credit, one hour.
    The student will complete clinical hours in a selected facility reviewing leadership styles and responsibilities. Pass or Fail
  
  • NU 732 Patient Experiences in Nursing (Optional)


    Credit, one hour.
    The student will complete clinical hours in a selected facility engaging leaders with process improvement and the patient experience. Pass or Fail
  
  • NU 733 Quality and Safety Experiences in Nursing (Optional)


    Credit, one hour.
    The student will complete clinical hours in a selected facility engaging quality and safety practices and responsibilities. Pass or Fail
  
  • NU 734 Human Resource Experiences in Nursing (Optional)


    Credit, one hour.
    The student will complete clinical hours in a selected facility reviewing allocation of human resources and responsibilities. Pass or Fail
  
  • NU 735 Financial Resource Experiences in Nursing (Optional)


    Credit, one hour.
    The student will complete clinical hours in a selected facility reviewing allocation of financial resources and responsibilities. Pass or Fail
  
  • NU 809 Fellowship I


    Credit, four hours.
    This course is a faculty-guided scholarly experience to allow the student to implement an evidence-based practice project addressing the clinically relevant problem. The student will prepare and submit for IRB approval.
  
  • NU 812 Fellowship II


    Credit, four hours.
    This course is a faculty-guided scholarly experience to allow the student to implement an evidence-based practice project addressing the clinically relevant problem.
  
  • NU 815 Diversity and Social Issues in Health Care


    Credit, three hours.
    This course examines contemporary issues faced by today’s advanced practice nurse and identifies the new skills needed to deliver patient-centered care in a changing society. The student will understand how the social determinants of health related to health status and will investigate their impact on future health outcomes. Additionally, this course introduces the multifaceted issue of health disparities in the U.S health care system. Socially marginalized and economically disenfranchised populations will be examined at the individual, systemic and institutional levels. The student will explore the intersections of culture, education, literacy, language, social class and community networks with race, ethnicity, and immigration status. They learn how new skills such as cultural competence and health literacy improve the delivery of health care.
  
  • NU 830 Ethics and Health Care Policy Transformation and Economics


    Credit, three hours.
    This course explores the legal, policy and ethical issues encountered by health care professionals in the continuously evolving health care system. Topics will include government regulation of health care providers, patient consent to and refusal of treatment, human reproduction issues, privacy and confidentiality, tax-exemption, antitrust, fraud and abuse, mental health issues and health information management. Students will gain the ability to analyze legal and ethical health care resources by engaging in interactive discussions and informative research.

Old Testament Studies

  
  • OT 510 Hebrew Exegetical Tools


    Credit, three hours.
    An introduction to the Hebrew alphabet, word formation, and verbal system.  Emphasis is placed on developing skills in the use of concordances and lexica, as well as the use of various linguistic helps, differing Bible translations, and other exegetical tools.
  
  • OT 511 Old Testament Introduction


    Credit, three hours.
    Examines critical issues related to Old Testament introduction.
  
  • OT 512 The Pentateuch


    Credit, three hours.
    Provides a study of the Law. The historical background, interpretation, and contemporary significance of the books from this section of the Hebrew Bible are examined, either collectively, in groups, or individually. The course may be repeated when content changes.
  
  • OT 513 The Prophets


    Credit, three hours.
    Provides a study of the Former and Latter Prophets. The historical background, interpretation, and contemporary significance of books from this section of the Hebrew Bible are examined, either collectively, in groups, or individually. The course may be repeated when content changes.
  
  • OT 514 The Prophets


    Credit, three hours.
    Provides a study of the Former and Latter Prophets. The historical background, interpretation, and contemporary significance of books from this section of the Hebrew Bible are examined, either collectively, in groups, or individually. The course may be repeated when content changes.
  
  • OT 515 The Writings


    Credit, three hours.
    Provides a study of the Writings. The historical background, interpretation, and contemporary significance of books from this section of the Hebrew Bible are examined, either collectively, in groups, or individually. The course may be repeated when content changes.
  
  • OT 517 Exegesis in Hebrew


    Credit, three hours.
    Presents a detailed analysis of selected books or portions of books from the Hebrew Bible. Emphasis is given to vocabulary building, location of verbs, and pronunciation as well as exegesis. Use of lexicon is a major component of classwork. The course may be repeated when content changes.
  
  • OT 518 Special Topics in Old Testament


    Credit, three hours.
    Investigates special topics in Old Testament designed to meet specific needs and special interests and to explore current issues in the field. The course may be repeated when content changes.
  
  • OT 520 Old Testament: Torah & Historical Narrative


    Credit, three hours.
    The content of this course includes studies in literature, culture, history and theology of the Old Testament narratives, from Genesis through Esther, from a Christocentric perspective.
  
  • OT 521 Old Testament: Prophets & Writings


    Credit, three hours.
    The content of this course includes studies in the literature, culture, history and theology of the Old Testament poetry and prophecy, from Job through Malachi, from a Christocentric perspective.

Physical Science

  
  • PH 101 Physical Science


    Credit, four hours.
    A one-academic period (semester) course, which develops topics from selected areas of physics, chemistry, earth science, and astronomy historically and topically. It fulfills one of the laboratory sciences requirements of the University’s basic course requirements. Three hours lecture and two hours laboratory.
  
  • PH 215 Astronomy


    Credit, four hours.
    A non-mathematical survey of astronomy. Topics will include the solar system, stars, and galaxies. This course satisfies one of the laboratory science requirements of the core curriculum. Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory. 
  
  • PH 298 Study in Selected Topics


    Credit, one to six hours.
    Courses offered to provide opportunities for competent students to study in areas of interest other than those elsewhere defined. This series is primarily classroom function, either seminar or lecture, permitting flexibility in course offerings.
  
  • PH 301 General Physics I


    Credit, four hours.
    A physics course for students majoring in biology, the health professions, or the social sciences.  Stress is placed on basic principles.  Topics include vectors, kinematics, Newton’s laws, circular motion, work, energy, impluse, momentum, rotational motion, elasticity, simple harmonic motion, fluids, waves, sound, fluids, solids, and thermodynamics. Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite(s): MA 113  
  
  • PH 302 General Physics II


    Credit, four hours.
    A continuation of PH 301 . Topics include electric fields, Gauss’ law, electric potential, capacitance and dielectrics, current and resistance, D.C. circuits, magnetic fields, Faraday’s law, inductance, A.C. circuits, electromagnetic waves, light, geometric optics, interference, particles and waves, quantum theory, and nuclear structure and reactions.  Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite(s): PH 301  minimum grade C
  
  • PH 311 Physics for Scientists and Engineers I


    Credit, four hours.
    A survey course in physics for science and engineering students.  Introduces the use of calculus in interpreting physical phenomena.  Problem solving and problem solving logic are an important part of this course.  Topics include vectors, kinematics, Newton’s laws, circular motion, work, energy, impulse, momentum, rotational motion, elasticity, simple harmonic motion, fluids, waves, and sound.  Three hours lecture, one hour recitation and two hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite(s): MA 201 , MA 202  or permission of the instructor.
  
  • PH 312 Physics for Scientists and Engineers II


    Credit, four hours.
    A continuation to PH 311 . Topics include: waves, electric fields, Gauss’ law, electric potential, capacitance and dielectrics, current and resistance, D.C. circuits, magnetic fields, Faraday’s law, inductance, A.C. circuits, electromagnetic waves, light, geometric optics, interference, diffraction, quantum theory, atomic structure, wave properties of matter, the hydrogen atom, many-electron atoms, and nuclear structure and reactions.  Three hours lecture, one hour recitation and two hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite(s): PH 311 , minimum grade C.
  
  • PH 497 Study in Selected Topics


    Credit, one to six hours.
    Courses offered to provide opportunities for students to study in areas of interest other than those elsewhere defined. This series is primarily a classroom function, either seminar or lecture, permitting flexibility in course offerings.
  
  • PH 498 Study in Selected Topics


    Credit, one to six hours.
    Courses offered to provide opportunities for students to study in areas of interest other than those elsewhere defined. This series is primarily a classroom function, either seminar or lecture, permitting flexibility in course offerings.

Psychology

  
  • PSY 201 Introduction to Psychology


    Credit, three hours.
    Designed to provide the student with an introduction to the scientific study of behavior and experience as it is represented in the many areas of psychology, including learning, thinking, personality, motivation, emotion, adjustment, behavior disorders, and psychotherapy.
  
  • PSY 297 Study in Selected Topics


    Credit, one to six hours.
    Courses offered to provide opportunities for students to study in areas of interest other than those elsewhere defined. This series is primarily a classroom function, either seminar or lecture, permitting flexibility in course offerings. Prerequisite(s): PSY 201 Introduction to Psychology  

     

  
  • PSY 298 Study in Selected Topics


    Credit, one to six hours.
    Courses offered to provide opportunities for students to study in areas of interest other than those elsewhere defined. This series is primarily a classroom function, either seminar or lecture, permitting flexibility in course offerings. Prerequisite(s): PSY 201 Introduction to Psychology  
  
  • PSY 301 Human Growth and Development


    Credit, three hours.
    Provides the student an overview of human growth and development across the life span. Areas of study include the physical, cognitive, emotional, and social development of the individual across the lifespan. Emphasis is on the historical, sociological and psychological foundations of learning with respect to human growth and development.
  
  • PSY 303 Psychology of Learning and Behavior


    Credit, three hours.
    Emphasizes the basic principles of classical and operant conditioning as well as cognitive and skill learning. Connectionist approaches that can integrate both behaviorist and cognitive research and theory will be emphasized. Prerequisite(s): PSY 201 Introduction to Psychology  
  
  • PSY 304 Experimental Psychology


    Credit, three hours.
    A study of the basic principles of research experimentation as utilized in psychology. Ethics of psychological research will be an ongoing focus of the course. Students will be required to design and write a research proposal in APA style. Students will learn to conduct basic statistical analysis using SPSS software.  Prerequisite(s): PSY 201 Introduction to Psychology  and MA 211   (WI)
  
  • PSY 310 Cognitive Psychology


    Credit, three hours.
    An examination of the various cognitive processes, including attention, pattern recognition, long-and-short term memory, categorization, language, semantic organization, and problem solving. Prerequisite(s): PSY 201 Introduction to Psychology  
  
  • PSY 315 Abnormal Psychology


    Credit, three hours.
    An introductory survey of the field of abnormal psychology. Emphasis is placed on the study of the history, dynamics, and types of maladaptive behavior. Prerequisite(s): PSY 201 Introduction to Psychology  
  
  • PSY 320 Adolescent Psychology


    Credit, three hours.
    A study of the characteristics of adolescents and their culture. Areas of study include their physical, emotional, social, intellectual, and moral development. Prerequisite(s): PSY 201 Introduction to Psychology  
  
  • PSY 323 Introduction to Family Therapy


    Credit, three hours.
    An introduction to the field of family therapy. The course will review the various theories that apply in family counseling. Prerequisite(s): PSY 201 Introduction to Psychology  
  
  • PSY 325 Introduction to Counseling


    Credit, three hours.
    A study of the basic techniques of counseling as applied by therapists, social workers, religious leaders, and others engaged in counseling activities. An important focus of the course will be placed on ethical issues applying to counselors. Special emphasis is given to a survey of the various theories of counseling. Prerequisite(s): PSY 201 Introduction to Psychology  
  
  • PSY 331 Psychology of Happiness


    Credit, three hours.
    Review of historical and philosophical foundations of positive psychology, including application of science with attention to human strengths, coping, and lifespan development. Prerequisite(s): PSY 201  
  
  • PSY 332 Psychology of Diversity


    Credit, three hours.
    Review of theories and research investigating psychological perspectives of cultural diversity, stereotypes, bias, power, and impacts of inequality using social, cognitive, and behavior approaches. Prerequisite(s): PSY 201  
  
  • PSY 333 Psychology of Social Influence


    Credit, three hours.
    Review of research and practice from a social psychological approach to introduce theories and principles of how people influence one another. Prerequisite(s): PSY 201  
  
  • PSY 338 Health Psychology


    Credit, three hours.
    Health psychology examines how psychological states influence physical health in a variety of ways.  This course will focus on promotion and maintenance of health behaviors, as well as the development and treatment of illness.  Students will develop an understanding of how mind/body relationship contributes to each of these issues and to the larger discipline of psychology.
  
  • PSY 403 Theories of Personality


    Credit, three hours.
    A comprehensive study of theories of personality: the personal histories of the theorists, the salient features of the theories, and their current status and evaluation. Prerequisite(s): PSY 201 Introduction to Psychology , Psychology major or minor or permission of the instructor. (WI)
  
  • PSY 404 Adult Psychology


    Credit, three hours.
    The focus of this course is help the student acquire a greater understanding of the self. Attention is centered on personality structure, growth and maturity. The student is involved in introspection and group interchange. Some attention is also given to normal and abnormal behavior. Prerequisite(s): PSY 201 , Psychology major or minor or permission of the instructor.
  
  • PSY 411 History and Systems of Psychology


    Credit, three hours.
    Review of the history of psychology, with special emphasis on how historical movements have shaped modern systems of psychology. Prerequisite(s): PSY 201 Introduction to Psychology . Prerequisite or Corequisite: Senior Psychology major or Psychology minor or permission from the instructor. (WI)
  
  • PSY 420 Political Psychology


    Credit, three hours.
    Political psychology is the study of how psychology shapes political beliefs and behaviors. A sample of topics includes how individuals form party attachments, perceive candidates, become good leaders, or justify violence or dishonesty; and how attitudes and perceptions affect the criminal justice system.
  
  • PSY 426 Senior Internship


    Credit, 1-9 hours.
    Study of and supervised participation in various professional service agencies in the Mobile area, in order that students may see the need for trained psychologists and social workers and visualize their own special educational needs in qualifying for such positions. The student is placed with a community agency or organization with a minimum intern service of 50 hours for each semester hour earned in the course. Prerequisite(s): PSY 201 Introduction to Psychology . Completion of twenty semester hours in psychology, approval of the instructor.
  
  • PSY 431 Independent Study


    Maximum credit, eight hours.
    Courses offered to provide opportunities for students to pursue an independent study or research project in the major area, with the approval of the advisor, instructor, and dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. Prerequisite(s): PSY 201 Introduction to Psychology .  Completion of eighteen semester hours with a 3.00 GPA or higher in the major. (See independent study contract for requirements and details.)
  
  • PSY 452 Multicultural Counseling


    Credit, three hours.
    In this course, students will critically examine their beliefs and their relevant behaviors regarding race, gender, sexual orientation, socioeconomic status, religion, age, and ability. Knowledge gained in this course can be applied to enhance students’ personal relationships and to increase their effectiveness in professions that deal with a culturally diverse public. Usually offered every two years.
  
  • PSY 460 Experimental Research Practicum


    Credit, three hours.
    Advanced students will expand their knowledge of psychology by working with a faculty-led student research team to design, implement, analyze, report, and disseminate the results of experimental research in psychology. Prerequisite(s): PSY 304  , PSY 304L, & Instructor Permission.
  
  • PSY 488 Interdisciplinary Seminar (Senior Seminar for Graduate school)


    Credit, one hour.
    Senior Seminar serves as a transitional seminar from undergraduate to graduate school. The course provides a capstone experience for students to understand the skills, values, behaviors, and attitudes that they have learned in their specific disciplines, while addressing how these competencies can serve as the basic for graduate school studies. The course is designed specifically for students interested in applying graduate school and will include topics such as identifying and selecting programs; understanding the application process; and preparing for applications and interviews. Prerequisite(s): Senior standing or permission from the instructor.
  
  • PSY 497 Study in Selected Topics


    Credit, one to six hours.
    Courses offered to provide opportunities for students to study in areas of interest other than those elsewhere defined. This series is primarily a classroom function, either seminar or lecture, permitting flexibility in course offerings. Prerequisite(s): PSY 201 Introduction to Psychology  
  
  • PSY 498 Study in Selected Topics


    Credit, one to six hours.
    Courses offered to provide opportunities for students to study in areas of interest other than those elsewhere defined. This series is primarily a classroom function, either seminar or lecture, permitting flexibility in course offerings. Prerequisite(s): PSY 201 Introduction to Psychology  

Philosophy

  
  • PY 101 Introduction to Philosophy


    Credit, three hours.
    An introduction to the three major philosophical traditions of the western world (Greek, Roman, and Judeo-Christian), with emphasis on the dominant themes associated with each tradition. (OC)
  
  • PY 201 Classical Philosophy


    Credit, three hours.
    A study of selected writings of the classical philosophers, with emphasis on Plato and Aristotle.
  
  • PY 202 Medieval Philosophy


    Credit, three hours.
    A history of the development of western philosophical thought within its cultural contexts in the Middle Ages. Philosophical problems such as the nature of faith, reason, universals, and God will be considered in the thought of Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Boethius, Abelard, Anselm, and Aquinas. Prerequisite(s): PY 101 .
  
  • PY 203 Modern Philosophy


    Credit, three hours.
    A survey of the development of western philosophical thought within its cultural contexts from the Renaissance to the twentieth century. Philosophical issues such as logic, experience, reality, science, nature, education, and God will be explored in the thought of major philosophers from Descartes to Ricoeur. Prerequisite(s): PY 101 .
  
  • PY 297 Study in Selected Topics


    Credit, one to three hours.
    Courses offered to provide opportunities for competent students to study in areas of interest other than those elsewhere defined. This series is primarily a classroom function, either seminar or lecture, permitting flexibility in course offerings.
  
  • PY 298 Study in Selected Topics


    Credit, one to three hours.
    Courses offered to provide opportunities for competent students to study in areas of interest other than those elsewhere defined. This series is primarily a classroom function, either seminar or lecture, permitting flexibility in course offerings.
  
  • PY 305 God, Evil, and Suffering


    Credit, three hours.
    Study of the nature and problem of evil and suffering and the implications for understanding God. Selected writings will be considered from the Greek, Jewish, and Christian traditions.
  
  • PY 310 World Religions


    Credit, three hours.
    An introduction to the major religious traditions including Christianity, Judaism, Islam, Buddhism, Hinduism, and Confucianism.
  
  • PY 320 Logic


    Credit, three hours.
    Emphasis is on identifying, classifying, analyzing, and appraising arguments. Attention is given to the historical origins of logic beginning in ancient Greece and continuing through the development of the scientific method in Western culture. Prerequisite(s): PY 101 .
  
  • PY 350 Philosophy, Theology, and Literature


    Credit, three hours.
    A study of a selected text or texts, which have made substantial contributions to shaping world traditions.
  
  • PY 401 Hermeneutics


    Credit, three hours.
    A study of the interpretation of literary, philosophical, religious and sociological texts (WI)
  
  • PY 406 Myth, Philosophy, and Literature


    Credit, three hours.
    A study of the myths and mythologies of world cultures, with emphasis on the three great traditions that have formed modern European and American culture: the Greek, the Roman, and the Hebraic.
  
  • PY 411 Faith and Doubt


    Credit, three hours.
    A systematic treatment of the great problems of philosophy and religion, the nature of knowledge, God, man, suffering and evil, history, and immortality. (WI)
  
  • PY 412 Moral Philosophy/Ethics


    Credit, three hours.
    A study in depth of the Christian ethic and its application to various levels of life, family, race, politics, business, recreation, and international relations. Prerequisite(s): Upper level standing. (WI)
  
  • PY 488 Interdisciplinary Seminar


    Credit, three hours.
    Study of selected theme or topic designed to synthesize and reveal the coherence of the undergraduate curriculum. (WI)
  
  • PY 497 Study in Selected Topics


    Credit, one to three hours.
    Courses offered to provide opportunities for competent students to study in areas of interest other than those elsewhere defined. This series is primarily a classroom function, either seminar or lecture, permitting flexibility in course offerings.
  
  • PY 498 Study in Selected Topics


    Credit, one to three hours.
    Courses offered to provide opportunities for competent students to study in areas of interest other than those elsewhere defined. This series is primarily a classroom function, either seminar or lecture, permitting flexibility in course offerings.

Graduate Research

  
  • RH 592 Directed Study and Research in the Old Testament


    Credit, one to three hours.
    Provides an opportunity for students to explore through directed readings and research those problems and issues of special significance in the field of Old Testament study. The course may be repeated when subjects change. Requires special permission of the appropriate professor and advisor.
  
  • RH 593 Directed Study and Research in the New Testament


    Credit, one to three hours.
    Provides an opportunity for students to explore through directed readings and research those problems and issues of special significance in the field of Intertestamental and New Testament study. The course may be repeated when subjects change. Requires special permission of the appropriate professor and advisor.
  
  • RH 594 Directed Study and Research in Theology


    Credit, one to three hours.
    Provides an opportunity for students to explore through directed readings and research those problems and issues of special significance in the field of theological studies. The course may be repeated when subjects change. Requires special permission of the appropriate professor and advisor.
  
  • RH 598 Graduate Capstone Assessment


    No credit hours.
    This required capstone measures graduate student competency for ministry and further graduate studies through a series of assessments relating to Student Learning Outcomes for the School of Christian Studies graduate program.
  
  • RH 599 Thesis Prospectus


    Credit, three hours.
    This course constitutes the first half of the Thesis writing project for the Master’s degree.  The student will work with his/her Thesis advisor to do research for and write a Thesis prospectus for approval by the School of Christian Studies faculty by the end of the enrolled semester.
  
  • RH 599.1 Thesis Defense


    Credit, three hours.
    This course constitutes the second half of the Thesis writing project for the Master’s degree.  The student will work with his/her Thesis advisor, the Thesis Committee, and School of Christian Studies faculty to defend successfully the critical thinking, oral communication, and written communication of the Thesis within the enrolled semester.

Sociology

  
  • SA 202 Introduction to Sociology


    Credit, three hours.
    A study of the nature, processes, and functions of human society. The student learns the language of sociology and is introduced to its major concerns. Groups and institutional structures are studied, with special emphasis given to the rapid social changes in modern society. This course is normally the first course taken in sociology.
  
  • SA 203 Modern Social Problems


    Credit, three hours.
    A survey and analysis of the social problems confronting contemporary America, such as crime, racial conflict, population changes, poverty, alcoholism, drugs, and social alienation.
  
  • SA 297 Study in Selected Topics


    Credit, one to six hours.
    Courses offered to provide opportunities for competent students to study in areas of interest other than those elsewhere defined. This series is primarily a classroom function, either seminar or lecture, permitting flexibility in course offerings.
  
  • SA 298 Study in Selected Topics


    Credit, one to six hours.
    Courses offered to provide opportunities for competent students to study in areas of interest other than those elsewhere defined. This series is primarily a classroom function, either seminar or lecture, permitting flexibility in course offerings.
  
  • SA 301 Marriage and the Family


    Credit, three hours.
    A functional course designed to assist in developing perspectives and analyzing issues concerning courtship, marriage, and family life in contemporary American society.
  
  • SA 304 Sociology of Religion


    Credit, three hours.
    An analysis of the interrelation between religious practices and personality, culture, and the institutions of society.
  
  • SA 322 Social Psychology


    Credit, three hours.
    A study of the effects of social influence, including such social factors as conformity, prejudice, aggressiveness, and group movements. Emphasis is placed on the role of the home, school, and peer group in influencing behavior. (WI)
 

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