2021-2022 Academic Catalog & Student Handbooks 
    
    Aug 17, 2022  
2021-2022 Academic Catalog & Student Handbooks [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


Course descriptions are listed alphabetically by subject prefix. Each course description begins with a subject prefix followed by a three-digit course number and the course title. If a course includes laboratory or other special activities, that information is contained in the course description. Prerequisites and co-requisites are also listed. A prerequisite is a course, experience, or other required preparation that must be completed before the student will be permitted to enroll in the course. A co-requisite is a course, experience, or other preparation that must be completed at the same time that the student is enrolled in the listed course.

Courses numbered 100 to 199 are primarily for freshmen, 200 to 299 for sophomores, 300 to 399 for juniors and seniors, and 400 to 499 for seniors. Courses numbered 500 to 699 are reserved for graduate students. Courses numbered 700 to 899 are reserved for doctoral students.

Please note, when searching courses by “Code or Number”, an asterisk (*) can be used to return mass results. For instance, a “Code or Number” search of ” 5* ” can be entered, returning all 500 or graduate-level courses.

 

Other Courses

  
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    CE 526 Early Childhood Administration, Management, and Leadership


    Three hours
    This course will provide early childhood educators with essentials for administering, directing, and managing early childhood programs and childcare centers.  Students will be introduced to common administrative responsibilities including basic health and safety, business practices, personnel management, conflict resolution, parent, community, and outside agency relationships, assessment, coaching, and mentoring.
  
  •  

    HI 345 African American History


    three hours
    A survey of the African American experience in the United States from European colonizatioin to the present.
  
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    HI 408 Slavery and Abolition in the United States


    three hours
    A study of slavery in North America with a particular focus on regional and temporal variations in slavery, the experiences of enslaved individuals, and the impact of slavery on the political, economic, social, and cultural development of the United States.
  
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    HI 409 The Civil Rights Movement


    three hours
    A study of the American Civil Rights Movement from the implementation and experience of segregation to the legacies of racial inequality in the modern era.
  
  •  

    TE 545 Connecting Learning Theory and Strategies


    Three hours
    This course will provide students with opportunities to connect learning theories with instructional strategies.  Students will learn the value of selecting instructional strategies that are based on learning theories and will gain an understanding of the importance of using learning theories to provide the foundation for the selection of instructional strategies.  Emphasis will also be placed on learning how to use academic language in written commentaries when referring to connections between learning theories and instructional strategies.

Accounting

  
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    AC 241 Principles of Accounting I


    Credit, three hours.
    Theory of debits and credits; journals and ledgers; asset and liability valuations; income determination; financial statement preparation and interpretation; accounting for proprietorships, partnerships, and corporations; basic concepts of managerial accounting. Must be taken in sequence.
  
  •  

    AC 242 Principles of Accounting II


    Credit, three hours.
    Theory of debits and credits; journals and ledgers; asset and liability valuations; income determination; financial statement preparation and interpretation; accounting for proprietorships, partnerships, and corporations; basic concepts of managerial accounting. Must be taken in sequence. Prerequisite(s): AC 241 
  
  •  

    AC 313 Intermediate Accounting I


    Credit, three hours.
    Advanced-level study of financial accounting principles and application of these principles to problems of determining financial position and results of operations of business enterprises. Must be taken in sequence. Prerequisite(s): AC 242 .
  
  •  

    AC 314 Intermediate Accounting II


    Credit, three hours.
    Advanced-level study of financial accounting principles and application of these principles to problems of determining financial position and results of operations of business enterprises. Must be taken in sequence. Prerequisite(s): AC 313 .
  
  •  

    AC 331 Accounting Internship


    Credit, one to three hours.
    Experience that enables students to apply accounting theory to practical accounting problems. Course should be helpful in deciding upon a career path in the accounting field. Prerequisite(s): Permission of the accounting instructor and completion of twelve semester hours of accounting courses with a minimum GPA of 3.00. Grades are either Pass or Fail.
  
  •  

    AC 332 Accounting Internship


    Credit, one to three hours.
    Experience that enables students to apply accounting theory to practical accounting problems. Course should be helpful in deciding upon a career path in the accounting field. Prerequisite(s): Permission of the accounting instructor and completion of twelve semester hours of accounting courses with a minimum GPA of 3.00. Grades are either Pass or Fail.
  
  •  

    AC 345 Cost Accounting I


    Credit, three hours.
    Developing and reporting information for use in making management decisions. Topics include budgeting; performance measurement; cost-volume-profit analysis; relevant costs for planning; job order, process, and standard cost accounting systems; cost allocations; and activity-based costing. Prerequisite(s): AC 242 
  
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    AC 346 Cost Accounting II


    Credit, three hours.
    Developing and reporting information for use in making management decisions. Topics include budgeting; performance measurement; cost-volume-profit analysis; relevant costs for planning; job order, process, and standard cost accounting systems; cost allocations; and activity-based costing. Prerequisite(s): AC 345 .
  
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    AC 347 Corporate and Business Taxation


    Credit, three hours.
    Study of income tax concepts for partnerships, S-corporations, and C-corporations. The effect of income taxation on business decisions and income taxation of various business entities will be emphasized. Basic tax research and tax planning are introduced. Return preparation is required. Prerequisite(s): AC 242 .
  
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    AC 426 Accounting Ethics


    Credit, three hours.
    To become familiar with the current role of accounting ethics in today’s business environment and professional accounting practice. To help accounting students fully understand how a commitment to ethics can enable accounting professionals to meet their ethical obligations to investors and creditors. To provide the ethical grounding that accounting students need to reconcile conflicts between stakeholder interests that can occur in the performance of audit, tax, and consulting services. Prerequisite(s): AC 314  and AC 449 . (WI)
  
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    AC 431 Independent Study


    Maximum credit, eight hours.
    A student with advanced standing may pursue an independent study or research project in the major area, with the approval of the advisor, instructor, and the dean of the School. Prerequisite(s): Completion of at least eighteen semester hours with a 3.00 GPA or better in the major. (See contract for requirements and details.)
  
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    AC 432 Independent Study


    Maximum credit, eight hours.
    A student with advanced standing may pursue an independent study or research project in the major area, with the approval of the advisor, instructor, and the dean of the School. Prerequisite(s): Completion of at least eighteen semester hours with a 3.00 GPA or better in the major. (See contract for requirements and details.)
  
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    AC 440 Accounting For Not-for-Profit Organizations


    Credit, three hours.
    A study of fund accounting as it is applied to governmental and other not-for-profit entities. Prerequisite(s): AC 314 .
  
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    AC 447 Federal Individual Taxation


    Credit, three hours.
    Emphasis on federal tax laws affecting individuals. Federal taxation of gifts, estates, and trusts will be reviewed. Tax planning and research, and ethical considerations will be included. Individual income tax returns must be prepared using tax preparation software. Prerequisite(s): AC 242 .
  
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    AC 448 Advanced Accounting


    Credit, three hours.
    Special topics, including accounting for business combinations, partnerships, governmental units; and preparation of consolidated financial statements. Prerequisite(s): AC 314 .
  
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    AC 449 Auditing


    Credit, three hours.
    Auditing objectives, standards, procedures, and reports. Includes risk assessment, evidence gathering, internal control evaluation, and professional responsibility. Prerequisite(s): AC 314 .
  
  •  

    AC 479 Advanced Auditing Topics


    Credit, three hours.
    Advanced topics in auditing including internal control evaluations, audit sampling, computer applications, ethical obligations, and reporting standards. Prerequisite(s): AC 449 .
  
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    AC 489 Principles of Fraud Examination


    Credit, three hours.
    Students will learn the specific steps, employed in a logical progression, to conduct a fraud examination. The focus of the examination will be narrowed from the general to the specific, eventually centering on a conclusion.  The development of a hypothesis and the continual refinement of the hypothesis will be emphasized. Prerequisite(s): AC 449  
  
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    AC 497 Study in Selected Topics


    Credit, one to six hours.
    Courses offered to provide competent students opportunities for study in areas of interest other than those previously listed. This series is primarily a classroom function, either seminar or lecture, permitting flexibility in course offerings.
  
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    AC 498 Study in Selected Topics


    Credit, one to six hours.
    Courses offered to provide competent students opportunities for study in areas of interest other than those previously listed. This series is primarily a classroom function, either seminar or lecture, permitting flexibility in course offerings.
  
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    AC 544 Accounting for Managerial Decision Making


    Credit, three hours.
    Provides an analysis of relevant accounting data for management decision making. Topics include budgeting, budgetary control, differential costs in alternative decisions, allocation of costs, cost relationships, pricing, standard costing, and performance evaluation. Prerequisite(s): (AC 241  and AC 242  or equivalent.)
  
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    AC 547 Federal Individual Taxation


    Credit, three hours.
    Provides a study of federal tax laws as they apply to selected entities, including an introduction to tax research methodology. Prerequisite(s): AC 242 .
  
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    AC 563 Accounting and Management Information Systems


    Credit, three hours.
    Provides an analysis of the types of information necessary for the manager in making effective decisions. Stress is placed on tools and techniques for computer-based information systems, internal reports, and accounting records as they contribute to the solution of decision-making problems. Relevant case studies and projects are utilized. The course will emphasize practical applications, using spreadsheets, databases, decision making, and computer simulation using current management and finance software. Cross-listed as: Same as CIS 563  Prerequisite(s): AC 544  or AC 345 , MA 211 , and MGT 321  or their equivalent. For students in integrated accounting program only.

Air Force Studies

  
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    AS 101 Foundations of USAF I


    Credit, one hour.
    AS 101 is a survey course designed to introduce students to the United States Air Force and encourage participation in Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps. Featured topics include: overview of ROTC, special programs offered through ROTC, mission and organization of the Air Force, brief history of the Air Force, introduction to leadership and leadership related issues, Air Force Core Values, Air Force officer opportunities, and an introduction to communication studies. Leadership Laboratory is mandatory for AFROTC cadets and complements this course by providing cadets with followership experiences. Co-requisite: AS 101L
  
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    AS 102 Heritage and Values II


    Credit, one hour.
    AS 102 is a survey course designed to introduce students to the United States Air Force and encourage participation in Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps. Featured topics include: overview of ROTC, special programs offered through ROTC, mission and organization of the Air Force, brief history of the Air Force, introduction to leadership and leadership related issues, Air Force Core Values, Air Force officer opportunities, and an introduction to communication studies. Leadership Laboratory is mandatory for AFROTC cadets and complements this course by providing cadets with followership experiences. Co-requisite: AS 102L
  
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    AS 201 Team/Leadership Fundamentals I


    Credit, one hour.
    AS 201 is designed to provide a fundamental understanding of both leadership and team building. Students will apply leadership perspectives when completing team building activities and discussing things like conflict management. Students should demonstrate basic verbal and written communication skills. Cadets will apply these lessons at Field Training, which follows AS 201 and AS 202. Co-requite: AS 201L
  
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    AS 202 Team/Leadership Fundamentals II


    Credit, one hour
    AS 202 is designed to provide a fundamental understanding of both leadership and team building. Students will apply leadership perspectives when completing team building activities and discussing things like conflict management. Students should demonstrate basic verbal and written communication skills. Cadets will apply these lessons at Field Training, which follows AS 201 and 202L. Co-requisite: AS 202L
  
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    AS 301 Lead People/Effect Comm I


    Credit, three hours.
    AS 301 is a study of leadership, management fundamentals, professional knowledge, Air Force personnel and evaluation systems, leadership ethics, and communication skills required of an Air Force junior officer. Case studies are used to examine Air Force leadership and management situations as a means of demonstrating and exercising practical application of the concepts being studied. A mandatory Leadership Laboratory complements this course by providing advanced leadership experiences in officer-type activities, giving students the opportunity to apply leadership and management principles of this course. Co-requisite: AS 301L
  
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    AS 302 Lead People/Effect Comm II


    Credit, three hours.
    AS 302 is designed to build on the leadership fundamentals taught in AS 200. Cadets will have the opportunity to utilize their skills as they begin more of a leadership role in the detachment. The course continues into advanced skills and ethics training that will prepare them for becoming an officer and supervisor. Case studies are used to examine Air Force leadership and management situations as a means of demonstrating and exercising practical application of the concepts being studied. A mandatory Leadership Laboratory complements this course by providing advanced leadership experiences in officer type activities, giving student the opportunity to apply leadership and management principles of the course. Co-requisite: AS 302L
  
  •  

    AS 401 Sec/Lead/ Comm Prep I


    Credit, three hours.
    AS 401 examines the national security process, regional studies, advanced leadership ethics, and Air Force doctrine. Special topics of interest focus on the military as a profession, ‘officership’, military justice, civilian control of the military, preparation for active duty, and current issues affecting military professionalism. Within this structure, continued emphasis is given to refining communication skills. Co-requisite: AS 401L
  
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    AS 402 Sec/Lead/Comm Prep II


    Credit, three hours.
    Course examines the national security process, regional studies, advanced leadership ethics, and Air Force doctrine. Special topics of interest focus on the military as a profession, officership, military justice, civilian control of the military, preparation for active duty, and current issues affecting military professionalism within this structure, continued emphasis is given to refining communication skills. Co-requisite: AS 402L
  
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    AS 494 Directed Study


    Credit, one to three hours.
    Students will receive individual instructor guidance and prepare formal report/research paper on some aspect of Air Force Studies or other assignments as determined by instructor.

Art

  
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    AR 201 Art Appreciation


    Credit, three hours.
    An analysis of the elements and qualities of visual art forms.
  
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    AR 203 Introduction to Photography


    Credit, three hours.
    A general introduction to photography.
  
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    AR 205 Beginning Watercolor


    Credit, three hours.
    A general introductory studio course designed to acquaint the student with the materials, tools, and techniques used in watercolor.
  
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    AR 221 Two-Dimensional Design


    Credit, three hours.
    An introductory studio course in the basics of composition and approaches to various art media.
  
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    AR 222 Drawing I


    Credit, three hours.
    An introductory studio course in the basic approaches to various art media as they relate to drawing.
  
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    AR 223 Three-Dimensional Design


    Credit, three hours.
    An introductory studio course in the basic approaches to three-dimensional art concepts.
  
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    AR 224 Drawing II


    Credit, three hours.
    A studio course designed to increase the technical skills and knowledge introduced in Beginning Drawing Studio.
  
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    AR 226 Introduction to Graphic Design


    Credit, three hours.
    An introduction to the use of the Macintosh computer, graphic design software and the skills and techniques used in graphic design and visual problem solving.
  
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    AR 228 Digital Literacy and Content Creation


    Credit, three hours.
    This course offers a fundamental understanding of the critical and practical aspects of digital tools, technologies, and resources. Students will learn how to navigate, evaluate, create, and critically apply information by using a wide variety of digital technologies including design software, social media tools, email marketing programs and blogging platforms. Cross-listed as: MKT 228  
  
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    AR 280 History of Graphic Design


    Credit, three hours.
    An exploration of the history of graphic design from the dawn of writing until today, including the development of handwriting, typefaces, and books; Arts & Crafts and the private press; posters, printing history, history of advertising; the Bauhaus; digital design and typography. Examines changes in style and technology within the field and considers the relationship between graphic design and its cultural, political and social contexts.
  
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    AR 297 Study in Selected Topics


    Credit, one to six hours.
    Courses offered to provide opportunities for students to study in areas of interest other than those elsewhere defined. This series is primarily a classroom function, either seminar or lecture, permitting flexibility in course offerings.
  
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    AR 298 Study in Selected Topics


    Credit, one to six hours.
    Courses offered to provide opportunities for students to study in areas of interest other than those elsewhere defined. This series is primarily a classroom function, either seminar or lecture, permitting flexibility in course offerings.
  
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    AR 300 Typography and Page Layout


    Credit, three hours.
    An introduction to the fundamentals of typography and its critical role in page layout. Through lectures, demonstrations and studio work, students are introduced to all aspects of type, from its historical precedents to its current use. Creative thinking is encouraged, along with prescribed techniques and media. Prerequisite(s): AR 226 .
  
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    AR 301 Graphic Design Print Production


    Credit, three hours.
    A survey of typography, page layout, paper selection, prepress techniques and the preparation of art for reproduction using both traditional and digitial means. The focus is on improving design knowledge and skills, as well as introducing students to project management disciplines. Prerequisite(s):  AR 300 .
  
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    AR 302 Digital Graphic Design Studio


    Credit, three hours.
    This course concentrates on educating students in the development of effective content for online, social and additional electronic media. Discussion includes theories and techniques of multimedia, interaction design and graphic design and how they relate. Prerequisite(s):   
  
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    AR 304 Branding & Identity Systems


    Credit, three hours.
    Creative exploration and application of complex visual communication skills to the development of a visual identity system. Brand Identity Design covers the theory and practice of creating a brand identity that is expressed in a system of tangible items that fuel the recognition of that brand. Prerequisite(s): AR 300  
  
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    AR 306 Advanced Watercolor


    Credit, three hours.
    A studio course designed to advance the technical skills and knowledge introduced in Beginning Watercolor. Emphasis is placed on creative expression through experimental studio work explaining various advanced watercolor techniques.
  
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    AR 310 Prehistoric to Renaissance


    Credit, three hours.
    A survey of the major visual art forms of Western civilization from the Prehistoric beginning into the Renaissance. (WI)
  
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    AR 311 Renaissance to Modern Art


    Credit, three hours.
    A survey of the major visual arts forms from the Renaissance to the Modern period.
  
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    AR 314 Professional Practices in Fine Arts


    Credit, three hours.
    The purpose of this course is to familiarize fine arts students with a variety of current professional practices that prepare students for the business aspects of a fine arts career. The focus is on the preparation of the portfolio and resume and on understanding business practices such as record keeping, contracts, shipping, and copyright. Search strategies for jobs, galleries, grants, and residencies are taught. A class project is completed, providing hands-on professional experience.
  
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    AR 315 Contemporary Art


    Credit, three hours.
    This course explores the issues and concepts of contemporary movements in art. (WI)
  
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    AR 321 Painting I


    Credit, three hours.
    A beginning-level painting studio with a creative and experimental approach to various historical styles.
  
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    AR 322 Painting II


    Credit, three hours.
    An intermediate-level painting studio with emphasis on creative and experimental approaches in painting.
  
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    AR 331 Internship


    Credit, three hours.
    Qualified studio art and graphic design students of sophomore, junior, or senior standing may obtain an internship for at least 100 hours of supervised professional experience. Grades are either Pass or Fail. This course may be repeated for up to six (6) hours of credit. Grades are either Pass or Fail.
  
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    AR 341 Ceramics I


    Credit, three hours.
    A studio course dealing with the understanding of clay properties and construction of basic forms in clay.
  
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    AR 342 Ceramics II


    Credit, three hours.
    A studio course designed to advance the technical skills and knowledge introduced in Beginning Ceramics. Emphasis is placed on creative expression through experimental studio work and exploring new procedures.
  
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    AR 361 Sculpture I


    Credit, three hours.
    An introduction to sculpture that explores traditional techniques and tools in creating three-dimensional sculpture.
  
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    AR 362 Sculpture II


    Credit, three hours.
    An advanced sculpture course that involves a contemporary approach in materials, craft, creativity, and the process of making sculpture. The student will exemplify a knowledge and dexterity of equipment skills and making techniques. Prerequisite(s): AR 361  
  
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    AR 370 Conceptual Drawing


    Credit, three hours.
    An advanced study of drawing that emphasizes the personal development of techniques, expression, critical analysis, and experimentation with non-traditional media.
  
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    AR 380 Digital Photography


    Credit, three hours.
    An introduction to the digital photography practice. This course will explore different techniques, aesthetics, and concepts. These elements will be expressed through demonstrations, lectures, and projects.
  
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    AR 401 Web Design


    Credit, three hours.
    An introduction to the design, development, implementation and testing of effective interfaces based on the principles of graphic design, interactivity and usability. HTML, CSS, Javascript, navigation systems, visual hierarchy, basic animations, image preparation and file transferring protocols are among topics covered. Emphasis is placed on conceptual development, structure, interactivity and design aesthetics. Prerequisite(s):  .
  
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    AR 402 Portfolio Design


    Credit, three hours.
    This course focuses on the preparation of students for the competitive job market including resume writing and portfolio creation through lecture, demonstration and studio work. Existing projects are refined and gaps are filled with new projects. The course culminates with the creation of a professional portfolio of work. Prerequisite(s):  
  
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    AR 420 Senior Thesis


    Credit, three hours.
    Advanced-level studio course directed toward individual creative activity and research. (WI)
  
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    AR 431 Independent Study


    Maximum combined credit, eight hours.
    Courses offered to provide opportunities for students to pursue an independent study or research project in the major area, with the approval of the advisor, instructor, and dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. Prerequisite(s): Completion of at least eighteen semester hours with a 3.00 GPA or better in the major. (See contract for requirements and details.)
  
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    AR 432 Independent Study


    Maximum combined credit, eight hours.
    Courses offered to provide opportunities for students to pursue an independent study or research project in the major area, with the approval of the advisor, instructor, and dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. Prerequisite(s): Completion of at least eighteen semester hours with a 3.00 GPA or better in the major. (See contract for requirements and details.)
  
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    AR 488 Interdisciplinary Seminar


    Credit, three hours.
    Study of a selected theme or topic designed to synthesize and reveal the coherence of the undergraduate curriculum. Prerequisite(s): Normally limited to seniors with the approval of the course director.
  
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    AR 497 Study in Selected Topics


    Credit, one to six hours.
    Courses offered to provide opportunities for students to study in areas of interest other than those elsewhere defined. This series is primarily a classroom function, either seminar or lecture, permitting flexibility in course offerings.
  
  •  

    AR 498 Study in Selected Topics


    Credit, one to six hours.
    Courses offered to provide opportunities for students to study in areas of interest other than those elsewhere defined. This series is primarily a classroom function, either seminar or lecture, permitting flexibility in course offerings.

Athletic Training

  
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    AT 501 Principles of Athletic Training


    Credit, three hours.
    This course is designed to provide the graduate level athletic training student with basic terminology of the athletic training profession while addressing concepts in professional responsibilities of the athletic trainer,diagnostic coding, risk management, injury pathology, domains of practice, and care and prevention of musculoskeletal and general medical conditions. Prerequisite(s): Admission into the MAT program.
  
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    AT 505 Management of Medical Emergencies


    Credit, three hours.
    The course will provide the student with foundational knowledge for determining identifiable risk factors for disease, preparation of emergency action plans, and recognition and care of medical emergencies. Observation within an emergency department (3 hours) as well as a ride along with emergency medical services (one full 12 hour shift) will be required throughout the semester. Prerequisite(s): Current CPR certification (either Basic Life Support of Professional Rescuer) and admission into the MAT program
  
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    AT 510 Clinical Skills Lab I


    Credit, one hour.
    This clinical skills lab is designed to provide the student with hands on approach through simulation and real-life guided scenarios dealing with emergent care of the injured patient. Skills acquisition in: CPR (1 and 2 persons/ adult, child, infant CPR), AED, obstructed airway, airway adjuncts, spinal motion restrictions, shock management, taping, bracing, splinting, environmental concerns, care of musculoskeletal and general medical conditions.This course will require assessment of clinical skills. Prerequisite(s): Admission into the MAT program
  
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    AT 511 Clinical Skills Lab II


    Credit, one hour.
    This clinical skills lab is designed to provide the student with a hands on approach through simulation and real-life guided scenarios dealing with emergent care of the injured patient. Skill acquisition in suturing, intravenous therapy, environmental, general medical, documentation and communication. The use of high and low fidelity manikins for simulations as well as standardized patient encounters will be instituted throughout. The course will be comprehensive in nature and require assessment of clinical skills. Prerequisite(s): Admission into the MAT program and successful completion of all courses within Term I.
  
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    AT 512 Clinical Skills Lab III


    Credit, one hour.
    This clinical skills lab is designed to provide the student with a hands on approach through simulation and real-life guided scenarios dealing with completing a comprehensive musculoskeletal evaluation. The use of high and low fidelity manikins for simulations as well as standardized patient encounters will be instituted throughout. The course will be comprehensive in nature and require assessment ofclinical skills. Prerequisite(s): Admission into the MAT program and successful completion of all courses within Term I and II.
  
  •  

    AT 513 Clinical Skills Lab IV


    Credit, one hour.
    This clinical skills lab course places emphasis on all aspects of patient care from injury prevention,general medical conditions, mental health, health informatics, health promotion, nutrition, and components of wellness. The use of high and low fidelity manikins for simulations as well as standardized patient encounters will be instituted throughout.The course will be comprehensive in nature and require assessment of clinical skills. Prerequisite(s): Admission into the MAT program and successful completion of all courses within Term I-IV
  
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    AT 515 Evidence Based Practice I


    Credit, one hour.
    This course investigates the concepts of evidence based practice as it relates specifically to healthcare. Students will focus on defining a clinically relevant question, searching for the best evidence through primary literature searches, determining the quality of the research, applying the evidence to clinical practice, and evaluating the process through which to generate a plan of care.  Prerequisite(s): Admission into the MAT program and successful completion of all courses within Term I.
  
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    AT 520 Evaluation of Musculoskeletal Injuries Lower Extremity


    Credit,four hours.
    The course combines both lecture and lab and provides the student with techniques and tools for effective evaluation of a patient. Surveys musculoskeletal injuries specific to the lower extremity, i.e., symptoms, initial and secondary clinical evaluation, and special tests leading to clinical impressions. This course includes lectures as well as hands-on laboratory sessions. Prerequisite(s): Admission into the MAT program and successful completion of all courses within Term I.
  
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    AT 525 Therapeutic Interventions Lower Extremity


    Credit, four hours.
    This course investigates the techniques of rehabilitation and therapeutic modalities to assist the patient in returning to his or her optimal potential in sports activities or activities of daily living. The course will focus on lower extremity conditions; specific to rehabilitation protocols and return to activities of daily living. Prerequisite(s): Admission into the MAT program and successful completion of all courses within Term I.
  
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    AT 530 Evaluation of Musculoskeletal Injuries Upper Extremity


    Credit, four hours
    The course combines both lecture and lab and provides the student with techniques and tools for effective evaluation of a patient. Surveys musculoskeletal injuries specific to the upper extremity, i.e., symptoms, initial and secondary clinical evaluation, and special tests leading to clinical impressions. This course includes lectures as well as hands-on laboratory sessions. Prerequisite(s): Admission into the MAT program and successful completion of all courses within Term I and II.
  
  •  

    AT 535 Therapeutic Interventions Upper Extremity


    Credit, four hours.
    This course investigates the techniques of rehabilitation and therapeutic modalities to assist the patient in returning to his or her optimal potential in sports activities or activities of daily living. The course will focus on upper extremity conditions; specific to rehabilitation protocols and return to activities of daily living. Prerequisite(s): Admission into the MAT program and successful completion of all courses within Term I and II.
  
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    AT 540 Psychosocial Strategies in Athletic Training


    Credit, three hours.
    This online course focuses on common psychological principles related to but not limited to: coping skills, motivation, goal setting, body image issues, nutritional concepts, anxiety, depression, suicide, non-suicidal tendencies, drug and alcohol abuse, stages of grief/loss, and treatment and referral strategies for acute and chronic conditions. This course will lead to adult/youth mental health first aid certification.  Prerequisite(s): Admission into the MAT program and successful completion of all courses within Term I-III.
  
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    AT 545 Advanced Diagnostic Imaging


    Credit, one hour.
    This course places emphasis on interpretation and identification of injuries and disease through medical imaging. Specific emphasis will be on theory and application of radiography, magnetic resonance imaging,computed tomography scan, fluoroscope, musculoskeletal ultrasound, and bone scans. This course is held on campus during May term. Observation within an Radiology department, 10 hours will be required throughout the semester. Prerequisite(s): Admission into the MAT program and successful completion of all courses within Term I-III.
  
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    AT 550 Introduction to Pharmacology


    Credit, three hours.
    This online course will investigate the pharmacological indications and contraindications of commonly used over the counter medications, prescription medications, narcotics, opioids, classifications of drugs, side effects, and effects on the body. Special emphasis will be placed on state and federal laws pertaining to commonly used medications within the athletic training facility. Prerequisite(s): Admission into the MAT program and successful completion of all courses within Term I-III
  
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    AT 555 BOC Exam Preparation


    Credit, one hour.
    This course is designed to prepare the student with the necessary study materials and tools to be successful on the Board of Certification exam. The course will be a comprehensive review of the BOC exam candidate handbook, practice analysis, professional domains and completion of BOC prep materials. The course will require successful completion of a written exam and an oral practicum exam to complete course requirements. Prerequisite(s): Admission into the MAT program and successful completion of all courses within Term I-IV
  
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    AT 560 Management Strategies in Athletic Training


    Credit, three hours.
    This course focuses on the administrative components of athletic training with emphasis on professional behaviors and professional development. Emphasis will be placed on legal, ethical, financial, facility, technological, operational, administrative, cultural, and leadership issues related to issues within athletic training. Prerequisite(s): Admission into the MAT program and successful completion of all courses within Term I-IV
  
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    AT 565 Evaluation of Head, Neck, and Spinal Injuries


    Credit, four hours.
    Surveys head, spine, and internal injuries, i.e., symptoms, initial and secondary clinical evaluation, and special tests leading to clinical impressions.Develops concepts in implementing emergency care and athletic training facility procedures. Prerequisite(s): Admission into the MAT program and successful completion of all courses within Term I-IV
  
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    AT 570 General Medical Conditions Assessment


    Credit, three hours
    This course is designed to present a collection of knowledge, skills, and values that the athletic training student must possess to recognize, treat and refer when appropriate, the general medical conditions and disabilities of athletes and others involved in physical activity over a lifespan. Observation within a General Medical facility, 10 hours will be required throughout the semester. Prerequisite(s): Admission into the MAT program and successful completionof all courses within Term I-IV
  
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    AT 575 Research Design in Athletic Training


    Credit, three hours.
    This course provides the student the opportunity to explore areas of research interest within the field of athletic training.  Prerequisite(s): Admission into the MAT program and successful completion of all courses within Term I-V
  
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    AT 580 Advanced Athletic Training Techniques


    Credit, one hour.
    This eight-week course will highlight specific techniques utilized in the profession of athletic training. Special emphasis will be on instrument assisted soft tissue mobilization, kinesiotaping, dry needling, cupping therapy,massage, and functional movement screening. Prerequisite(s): Admission into the MAT program and successful completion of all courses within Term I-V
  
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    AT 585 Senior Capstone in Athletic Training


    Credit, one hour.
    This course will allow the student the opportunity to present to faculty, staff, and classmates weekly clinical case studies and critiques of current research. Students will complete the athletic training portfolio and register for the BOC exam (no earlier than March/April). Prerequisite(s): Admission into the MAT program and successful completion of all courses within Term I-V
  
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    AT 590 Clinical I-Pediatric/ Adolescent Emphasis/ Lower Extremity


    Credit, two hours.
    This 16-week (2-week immersion; 14-week experience) clinical practicum will emphasize continuity of skills required for patient assessment, care, treatment and rehabilitation of the injured athlete under the direct supervision of the clinical supervisor (preceptors) within a middle/ high school setting. Emphasis will be placed on lower extremity conditions. Minimum of 150 hours, not including immersion, is required. Prerequisite(s): Admission into the MAT program and successful completion of all courses within Term I.
  
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    AT 591 Clinical II-College/ Professional Emphasis


    Credit, two hours.
    This 16-week (16-week experience) clinical practicum places emphasis on developing a continuity of the skills required for patient assessment, care, treatment and rehabilitation of the injured athlete under the direct supervision of the clinical supervisor (preceptors) for college/ professional athletes. This course may expose the student to intramural, recreational, and intercollegiate sports activities. Emphasis will be placed on upper extremity conditions. Minimum of 200 hours is required. Prerequisite(s): Admission into the MAT program and successful completion of all courses within Term I and II.
  
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    AT 592 Clinical III-Physical Therapy/ Orthopedics and Surgery/ Wellness


    Credit, two hours.
    This (4- week rotations of 3 sites) clinical component will allow the student multiple clinical rotations over the course of the semester. Each component will consist of a 4-week rotation. Each rotation will consist of 40 hours of supervised experience. The course will develop a rotation of interprofessional education with various healthcare professionals within the area of Mobile. Rotations will include physical therapy, orthopedics (surgery observation), and a wellness component. Prerequisite(s): Admission into the MAT program and successful completion of all courses within Term I-IV
  
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    AT 593 Clinical IV-Elective Clinical Immersion


    Credit, two hours.
    This 16-week (8 week immersion) clinical course allows student’s choice for site placement. An affiliated site agreement must be on file at least one month prior to the start of the experience. The preceptor must hold the AT credential. Prerequisite(s): Admission into the MAT program and successful completion of all courses within Term I-V
 

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