Student Handbooks 
    
    Nov 28, 2022  
Student Handbooks

School of Nursing Graduate Student Handbook 2022-2023



Preface

The graduate program in nursing at The University of Mobile is a school under the College of Health Professions as well as the Graduate Studies at The University. The handbook was developed for graduate students and faculty to define the philosophy and mission of the graduate programs and to provide a comprehensive document about the Master of Science in Nursing and Doctor of Nursing Practice programs. Information on requirements, and coursework; advising, financial aid, professional organizations, and policies and procedures are included. It is essential that students understand the information presented in this handbook to facilitate their progression through the School of Nursing. All students in The University of Mobile School of Nursing are responsible for the information contained in this handbook which details practices, procedures, and provisions of the school pertaining to academic progress, professional expectations, and related matters.

The School of Nursing Graduate Student Handbook is reviewed annually and as needed. The graduate faculty in the School of Nursing reserve the right to revise the requirements and policies, as deemed necessary at any time, to prepare students for new and emerging roles in nursing. Dissemination of revisions will be made via class and online announcements, and/or notices or posted on the designated School of Nursing website. An electronic copy is available to all students via the School of Nursing website. In addition, the School of Nursing Graduate Student Handbook will be incorporated into The University of Mobile’s online Graduate Catalog and Student Handbook. Students will be notified of any changes made to the School of Nursing Graduate Student Handbook.

The Nursing Graduate Student Handbook is not all-inclusive; rather it includes basic information regarding the mission, goals, and expected outcomes of the School of Nursing, as well as the school policies and procedures that reflect national standards and guidelines for the education of graduate students in the nursing profession.

Each student must sign a Graduate Student Handbook Acknowledge Form (See Appendix A)

indicating the student has read and is responsible for the information contained in the School of Nursing Graduate Student Handbook.

The University of Mobile endorses the intent of all federal and state laws created to prohibit discrimination. The University of Mobile does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, gender, sexual orientation, religion, age, veteran status in admissions or the provision of services.

Students are held accountable for information and policies published in official University of Mobile documents, including online Graduate Catalog and Student Handbook.

Dear Graduate Students:

Thank you for choosing the Graduate Nursing program at The University of Mobile School of Nursing. On behalf of the faculty and staff we are excited that God has led you to become a student in the graduate program. We are grateful for the opportunity to partner with you in fulfilling this God-ordained professional calling.

Opportunities for advanced practice nurses in health care are evolving and we are committed to preparing our students to embrace a myriad of opportunities as the nursing profession continues to expand. We believe that you will leave enriched and well prepared to address healthcare challenges both local and global, to meet the health needs of individuals, families, and communities.

The Graduate Student Handbook provides information on important policies, procedures and guidelines pertinent to graduate nursing education at The University of Mobile. Our expectation is that you will use this handbook as your first point of reference when you have questions concerning your program of study or academic policies within the School of Nursing. We hope that you find the Graduate Student Handbook a valuable resource in addressing your questions as a University of Mobile graduate student.

Congratulations once again on reaching this milestone in your professional career and we look forward to partnering with you in this educational endeavor.

Blessings,

Sarah Witherspoon, PhD, RN, LNC
Dean, School of Nursing
Professor of Nursing
Education Specialist
School of Nursing Graduate Faculty
251.442.2445
mailto:switherspoon@umobile.edu

The following faculty are available to assist you in understanding the curriculum, policies and procedures, etc. in completing the graduate nursing programs.

Sarah Witherspoon, PhD, RN, LNC
Dean, School of Nursing
Professor of Nursing
Education Specialist
School of Nursing Graduate Faculty
Weaver Hall Building, office # 316A
251.442.2445
switherspoon@umobile.edu

Jessica Garner, DNP, CRNP, FNP-C, CNE
School of Nursing Graduate Faculty
Weaver Hall Building, office # 316B
251.442.2339
jgarner@umobile.edu

Julie Hughes, DNP, CHSE®, CPNP-PC
Simulation Coordinator
School of Nursing Graduate Faculty
Weaver Hall Building, office # 316L
251.442.2393
jhughes@umobile.edu

Melinda McGaughy, DNP, CRNP, FNP-BC
Associate Professor
School of Nursing Graduate Faculty
Weaver Hall Building, office # 316C
251.442.2342
mmcgaughy@umobile.edu

Cindy Barfield, MSN, FNP-C
School of Nursing Graduate Faculty
cbarfield@umobile.edu

Kendra Strenth, DNP, RN
Assistant Professor of Nursing
Graduate Nursing Faculty
Weaver Hall, Office # 316N

251.442.2559
kstrenth@umobile.edu

Jennifer Thomas, Pharm.D, MS
School of Nursing Graduate Faculty
251.442.2253
jthomas@umobile.edu

Section I: Introduction

History of The University of Mobile

The University is a church-related institution of liberal arts and sciences chartered in 1961 as Mobile College and affiliated with the Alabama Baptist State convention. The University is the creation of people with a Christian Vision. It’s students are encouraged to become confident Christian men and women who have mastered the body of knowledge required by the degree they hold; who know how to think; who know what they believe and why they believe it; who possess the courage to live and work according to those beliefs; and who possess the willingness and skill to use their influence in appropriate and effective ways to change the world. The intent of The University is reflected in the preamble statement, “changing lives to change the world.” As stated in the mission statement, The University strives to establish and maintain a tradition of excellence in graduate programs.

History of the School of Nursing

The School of Nursing at The University of Mobile has a rich, 50-year history of preparing the finest professional nurses for our community and beyond. The Baccalaureate of Science degree in Nursing at The University of Mobile has its roots in the relationship between The University and Mobile Infirmary School of Nursing, which began in 1967. Students enrolled in the diploma program at the Mobile Infirmary School of Nursing were taking science courses at The University of Mobile. In 1973, Mobile Infirmary phased out the diploma program and supported the development of an Associate Degree Program at The Mobile College (Mobile College underwent a name change in 1993 and became The University of Mobile). In 1978, Mobile College established a Baccalaureate nursing program while continuing to operate the Associate Degree Program. The School of Nursing celebrates thirty-four years of preparing nurses and supporting the preamble statement, “changing lives to change the world.”

In 1987, the School of Nursing began a Master’s in Nursing Program (MSN) offering tracks in Adult Health Nursing and Nursing Administration. The master’s degree program, dual track in nursing education and administration will close. Fall 2019, the separation of the master’s programs (MSN Nursing Education and MSN Executive Leadership) will begin. Additionally, growth within the School of Nursing led to the offering of a Family Nurse Practitioner program in 2017. The School of Nursing introduced its first doctoral program offering with the Doctor of Nursing Practice program in 2018.

Administrative Structure of the College of Health Professions

The College of Health Professions is currently composed of three schools incorporating the School of Nursing, the School of Health and Sports Science, and the School of Allied Health.

In the School of Nursing, there are multiple nursing programs, three resulting in an undergraduate degree: Traditional Bachelor of Science in Nursing (TBSN); RN to Bachelor of Science in Nursing (RN-BSN); and Accelerated Bachelor of Science in Nursing (ABSN) and five resulting in a graduate degree: Master of Science in Nursing Education, Master of Science in Nursing Executive Leadership, Master of Science in Family Nurse Practitioner (BSN-MSN), FNP Post-Masters Certificate, and Doctor of Nursing Practice (BSN-DNP and MSN-DNP).

The School of Nursing has a Department Chair for the undergraduate programs and a Graduate Chair overseeing the MSN Family Nurse Practitioner (FNP) and Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) programs, as well as a Director of the Nursing Education and Nursing Executive Leadership programs who report directly to the Dean.

The Graduate Chair, the Graduate Faculty Committee, and the Dean participate in the decisions regarding the governance of the MSN and DNP programs, ensuring that relevant professional standards and guidelines are incorporated.

School of Nursing Mission Statement

The mission of The University of Mobile School of Nursing is to provide quality education in a Christian environment in order to prepare competent, caring practitioners in nursing. The school aspires to the highest standards of educational excellence, blending a professional perspective with a liberal arts and science foundation. The school is committed to the development of its students into knowledgeable, caring, responsible and self-directed individuals able to meet the health care needs of a diverse and complex society. The University of Mobile School of Nursing emphasizes quality teaching while encouraging and valuing scholarly activity and research to support that teaching.

School of Nursing Philosophy

The School of Nursing, an integral part of The University of Mobile, is dedicated to the advancement of higher education based upon Christian values. The nursing programs of The University of Mobile seek to prepare nurses with Christian ideals to meet the nursing needs of humanity.

The human is perceived as a holistic being; a psychosocial, spiritual, cultural, ethnic, and racial being capable of feelings, emotions, thoughts, and actions. The human is capable of higher levels of functioning in the cognitive, affective and psychomotor domains. The human is in a dynamic interaction with the environment, which results in change in individual social systems and in health care needs. To serve humanity, one must attempt to meet needs in totality since the human being is perceived as a unit and not a summation of parts.

Today’s society is complex and dynamic. It incorporates social controls to preserve its identity, to enable it to function systematically, and to be relatively enduring. Individuals assume roles within society, which are stipulated by the interaction between individuals and society.

Health is the physiological, psychological, and spiritual well-being of an individual, family, or group which allows or enables the individual, family, or group to function consistently at maximum potential. Health is an ever-changing state on a continuum from peak wellness to extreme states of ill health dependent upon individual or group adaptation to stressors. Rapid changes in science, technology, knowledge, and health problems, along with striking differences in family structures, emphasis on the legal rights of the individual, and cultural and environmental factors influence health needs.

Nursing is a collaborative process in which nurse’s assist the client and the client’s significant others in performing those activities which contribute to the achievement of maximum health potential through a holistic care approach. Nursing seeks to influence man’s balance on the wellness-illness continuum in a positive manner. A perception of, and concern for the needs of individuals, families, and groups are essential to nursing, as well as effective communication with individuals and the entire health care team.

The nursing process is a systematic problem-solving approach utilizing critical thinking for validating the perceived needs and problems of clients. This problem-solving process applied to nursing practice involves assessing, analyzing, planning, implementing, and evaluating. After identifying the needs and problems of individuals, families, and groups, the nurse formulates a nursing diagnosis. In collaboration with other health team members, the nurse plans, implements, and evaluates nursing care. Use of the nursing process promotes responsibility for nursing actions.

Education is the process involving teaching and learning by which one acquires knowledge, skills, values, attitudes, and the ability to think critically. Learning is viewed as a change in behavior based on the learner’s perception of that which is to be learned. Each learner and teacher is an individual with a unique background of experiences. The student analyzes, synthesizes, and integrates relationships among new and previous learning’s. In the teaching/learning process, a teacher facilitates the student’s learning. Relevance in learning depends upon how closely the student individually perceives the learning experience.

Nursing education assists the student to acquire the knowledge, which is essential to the profession. This includes, but is not limited to, developing a knowledge base for nursing, developing proficiency in selected psychomotor skills, and a model for nursing practice. Based upon this, qualified nursing faculty members recognize the uniqueness of the individual learner and seek to guide each student in learning experiences. Nursing education is more thorough, and perception is broadened when students are assisted in maintaining high input into their own learning and are guided by measurable goals and objectives.

A professional nurse is accountable for nursing actions. The professional nurse possesses the ability to continue professional and personal growth by pursuing lifelong learning as evidenced by completion of educational courses and/or graduate study, active participation in professional and related organizations, and being a contributing member of society.

Nursing education at the master’s level prepares a specialist who can function in a variety of advanced roles. Education at the master’s level in nursing involves expanding previous knowledge and skills and developing expertise in a specified area. Master’s level nursing education allows the student to become more involved in self-learning through critical inquiry, analysis, and research.

The Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) is designed to prepare experts in nursing practice. It is the pinnacle of practice-focused nursing degrees, building upon master’s programs by providing an educational foundation in quality improvement, evidence-based practice, and systems leadership.

School of Nursing Goals

The goals of The University of Mobile School of Nursing reflect the overall mission of The University to enhance the health and quality of life for all. The School of Nursing strives to:

  1. Develop academic programs that meet the needs of society and incorporate best practices in nursing education.
  2. Provide a supportive, collegial environment that encourages excellence in teaching-learning, professional development, and faculty/student scholarship.
  3.  Develop leaders capable of improving clinical practice outcomes, health policy, and care delivery methods.
  4. Prepare graduates able to provide safe, evidence-based, culturally competent, patient-centered care that reflects ethical clinical judgment and interprofessional collaboration.
  5. Cultivate in students an intellectual desire for advanced study and inquiry.

University Core Values

The University of Mobile is a Christ-centered academic community providing professional programs to renew minds through intellectual and spiritual development for the fulfilling of one’s professional calling. The core values of The University are supported by the nursing faculty and reflected in how we work and interact with others. The core values:

  • Christ-centered
  • Academically focused
  • Student-devoted
  • Distinctively driven

University Biblical Worldview

The faculty in the School of Nursing embrace the concept of teaching a biblical worldview to our students. The biblical worldview serves as a pathway by which students are prepared to fulfill the Great Commission as noted in God’s Word through:

“The fear of the Lord is the beginning of wisdom…” | Describes our calling to Him. (Proverbs
9:10)

“Then God said, Let Us make man in Our image, according to Our likeness;…” | Describes who
we are in Him. (Genesis 1:26)

“And do not be conformed to this world, but be transformed by the renewing of your mind, that
you may provide what is that good and acceptable and perfect” | Describes our transformation in
Him. (Romans 12:2)

Section II: Program Descriptions

Accreditations and Approvals

The University of Mobile’s Master of Science Programs are accredited through the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education, 655 K Street NW, Suite 750, Washington, DC 20001.

The Master of Science in Nursing Family Nurse Practitioner Program and Post-Master’s Family Nurse Practitioner Certificate program are accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges (SACS-COC). The address for SACS-COC is 1866 Southern Lane, Decatur, GA 30033.

The University of Mobile’s MSN Graduate Degree Programs are approved by the Alabama Board of Nursing, RSA Plaza, Suite 250, 770 Washington Avenue, Montgomery, AL 36104.

The University of Mobile’s Post-Master’s Family Nurse Practitioner Certificate Program is accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education, 655 K Street NW, Suite 750, Washington, DC 20001.

The University of Mobile’s Doctor of Nursing Practice Program is accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education, 655 K Street NW, Suite 750, Washington, DC 20001.

The Doctor of Nursing Practice Program is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges (SACS-COC). The address for SACS-COC is 1866 Southern Lane, Decatur, GA 30033.

Graduate Program Options

BSN-MSN Tracks
MSN Nursing Education Program
MSN Nursing Executive Leadership Program
MSN Family Nurse Practitioner Program

Certificate Track
Post-Masters Certificate Family Nurse Practitioner

BSN-DNP Track and MSN-DNP Track
Doctor of Nursing Practice

Graduate Program Descriptions

The graduate nursing programs build on the knowledge and competencies of baccalaureate nursing education. The structure and process of the graduate programs provide for the attainment of advanced knowledge and the skill in the practice of nursing.

The Graduate Nursing Programs at The University of Mobile School of Nursing has five program options:

  1. Nursing Education Program (BSN-MSN Track)
  2. Nursing Executive Leadership Program (BSN-MSN Track)
  3. Family Nurse Practitioner Program (BSN-MSN Track)
  4. Post-Masters Certificate Family Nurse Practitioner
  5. Doctor of Nursing Practice (BSN-DNP and MSN-DNP Tracks)

Master of Science in Nursing Degree in Nursing Education

The Master of Science in Nursing Education prepares graduate-level nurses to meet the critical need for nursing educators in a variety of educational healthcare settings. Students will gain an understanding of the teaching-learning process and its application. The program provides students with the knowledge and skills to become proficient in program development, learning outcome evaluation and professional role modeling. The nursing education curriculum is designed to provide clinical practicum experiences with nursing educators in a variety of quality healthcare systems. All courses in the MSN Nursing Education are offered online via the internet using a learning management system that includes a variety of technologies for interaction among students and faculty.

Master of Science in Nursing Executive Leadership

The Master of Science in Nursing Executive Leadership prepares graduate-level nurses for practice as nurse leaders and nurse administrators in a variety of healthcare settings. The program includes a series of integrated learning experiences that focus on the development of nurses with strong critical skills who are capable of leadership and innovation in a dynamic healthcare system. The curriculum is based on current, relevant nursing practice that challenges nurses to work as both individuals and group members to critically analyze, evaluate and develop solutions in response to emerging trends and issues in nursing practice and healthcare. Students will have clinical practicum experiences with nursing executive leadership in a variety of quality healthcare systems. All courses in the MSN Nursing Executive Leadership are offered online via the internet using a learning management system that includes a variety of technologies for interaction among students and faculty. In addition, the specialty program content focuses on the impact of national, state and local healthcare policy and financing on nursing practice.

These programs can be completed in as little as four semesters. In the Master of Science in Nursing Executive Leadership, students can earn a dual MSN/MBA with an additional 30 semester hours.

Master of Science Nursing Degree in Family Nurse Practitioner (FNP)

The MSN-FNP Program is designed to prepare the student for a career in advance practice nursing roles in primary care settings, providing care across the lifespan to children, adolescents, child-bearing women, and adults. The focus of the FNP is the management of common acute and chronic health care problems in diverse settings. Population health and epidemiology, management of information systems, and interprofessional collaboration are all emphasized. Pharmacology and pathophysiology prepare students for diagnosis and prescriptive authority.

All courses in the MSN Family Nurse Practitioner Program are offered online via the internet using a learning management system that includes a variety of technologies for interaction among students and faculty. The program is offered full-time or part-time.  

Post-Master’s Family Nurse Practitioner Certificate

The post-master’s certificate program is designed for master prepared nurses seeking opportunity to expand their advanced practice skills as a Family Nurse Practitioner.

The program is designed to prepare the student for a career in advance practice nursing roles in primary care settings, providing care across the lifespan to children, adolescents, child-bearing women, and adults. The focus of the FNP is the management of common acute and chronic health care problems in diverse settings. Population health and epidemiology, management of information systems, and inter-professional collaboration are all emphasized. Pharmacology and pathophysiology prepare students for diagnosis and prescriptive authority.

All courses in the MSN Family Nurse Practitioner Program are offered online via the internet using a learning management system that includes a variety of technologies for interaction among students and faculty. Courses are completed with three sixteen (16) week semesters and one twelve (12) week summer semester. There is a 1-2 week break between each academic term. Upon acceptance, all students are admitted to the full-time completion plan.

Doctor of Nursing Practice Degree (DNP)

The Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) is designed to prepare today’s nurse leaders with advanced knowledge and skills within the Christian worldview. The student will be prepared to lead healthcare initiatives anywhere from a small clinic to national health policy that is guided by evidence-based practice. The Doctor of Nursing Practice will be offered as an online program with on-campus intensives interspersed throughout the curriculum to enhance hands-on experience and networking with other leaders in nursing. Options for completion of the degree include the postmaster’s DNP and the BSN to DNP Family Nurse Practitioner.

Graduate Program Expected Outcomes

Graduate study at the master’s and doctoral levels builds on baccalaureate education and is designed to prepare scholarly, specialized nurses capable of assuming leadership responsibilities in current and emerging health care systems. The graduate degree programs in nursing provide students with diverse theoretical, clinical, and managerial learning experiences, which allow them to function in a broad variety of roles in advanced nursing practice. At the graduate level, students develop specialized competencies and greater capability to function in changing, complex health care delivery systems.

The curriculum guiding The University of Mobile Master of Science degree adheres to the Essentials of Master’s Education for Advanced Practice Nursing as articulated by the American Association of Colleges in Nursing (http://www.aacn.nche.edu) The guidelines of the AACN serve as a framework for the graduate nursing program. Upon completion of the graduate nursing program, the graduate will be able to demonstrate the knowledge, clinical skills, and professional attitude expected of the master’s prepared nurse.

Master of Science in Nursing Education Program Outcomes

Upon completion of the master’s program in Nursing Education, the learner will:

  1. Utilize theories from nursing and other disciplines to improve healthcare and nursing education outcomes.
  2. Develop organizing frameworks for the delivery of health care for nursing educators.
  3. Contribute to the development of scientific knowledge base in nursing by  recognizing researchable problems and participating in research to advance the nursing profession and improve nursing education.
  4. Utilize an identified process for guidance in making ethical decisions.
  5. Consider cultural diversity when planning and implementing health care and teaching and learning activities.
  6. Contribute as a leader to the restructuring of professional nursing roles as healthcare and nursing education needs emerge in society.

Master of Science in Nursing Executive Leadership Program Outcomes

Upon completion of the master’s program in Executive Leadership, the learner will:

  1. Engage in multi-disciplinary collaboration to improve health care delivery, while assuming responsibility for delegation and oversight of care delivery by other staff.
  2. Provide leadership in formulating and implementing policies that contributes to ongoing improvement of health care delivery systems.
  3. Apply principles of economics and budgeting into fiscal plans for improving organizational systems and administering safe and effective health care.
  4. Articulate methods, tools, performance measures, and standards related to quality patient care, to achieve positive patient outcomes within health care organizations.
  5. Function as a member and leader of inter-professional teams; communicating, collaborating, networking, and consulting with other health care professionals to manage and coordinate effective health care services.
  6. Develop leadership skills that emphasize ethical and critical decision-making, effective communication and working relationships with internal and external policy makers to advance the Executive leadership role.
  7. Incorporate leadership strategies to influence local, state, and national health care policies to effect improvement in global health care systems.

Master of Science and Post-Master’s Certificate in Nursing Family Nurse Practitioner Program Outcomes

Upon completion of the master’s program in Family Nurse Practice, the learner will:

  1. Implement the selected advanced nurse role as a practitioner within health care.
  2. Develop and nurture inter-professional collaborations by communicating and consulting with other health care professionals, including physicians, administrators, community leaders, regulators, and other health care providers.
  3. Evaluate the influence of ethical principles on personal and organization decision-making.
  4. Utilize nursing research for the promotion of quality nursing education, safe client-center health care, and evidence-based practice.
  5. Employ critical thinking in the application of nursing and multidisciplinary theoretical frameworks to foster optimal client health outcomes.
  6. Consider human diversity when planning and implementing health care and teaching activities.
  7. Demonstrate competence in leadership roles and a commitment to ongoing professional development for the provision of quality, cost-effective, clientcentered health care and the advancement of nursing practice.

The curriculum guiding The University of Mobile Doctor of Nursing Practice degree adheres to the DNP Essentials of Nursing as articulated by the American Association of Colleges in Nursing (http://www.aacn.nche.edu)

Doctor of Nursing Practice Program Outcomes

Upon completion of the Doctor of Nursing Practice program, the learner will:

  1. Integrate faith and nursing science with other disciplines to achieve the highest level of evidence-based practice to improve quality healthcare and address health disparities.
  2. Utilize intra and interprofessional collaboration to address health policy and health disparities to improve healthcare across diverse populations and cultures.
  3. Utilize theories, concepts and analytic methodologies to design, implement, and evaluate current nursing practice to improve and transform healthcare.
  4. Demonstrate and promote professionalism, advocacy, social justice, equity, ethical principles, and scientific integrity in advanced nursing practice.
  5. Recognize the uniqueness in individuals and communities to address disparities in population health and improve health outcomes
  6. Utilize current and evolving information systems/technology to support, evaluate and improve nursing care and healthcare systems.
  7. Utilize complex leadership skills to advance clinical practice and healthcare delivery at the organization and systems level and improve health outcomes for individuals and populations.

School of Nursing Expected Outcomes

  1. To prepare graduates with an adequate background to assure achievement of appropriate credentials.
  2. To prepare graduates who will practice the profession in a competent, caring manner, utilizing ideals and standards consistent with the Christian faith.
  3. To provide students with an education broad enough to assure a career in nursing, based not only upon nursing knowledge, but also upon a background of liberal arts and sciences.
  4. To prepare graduates who are able to think critically, and to express themselves clearly, correctly, and succinctly both orally and in writing.
  5. To provide opportunities for students to develop fully in a variety of areas including physical, social, spiritual, and professional, as both a leader and a follower.
  6. To provide opportunities for students to develop nursing skills in a variety of backgrounds within practice settings.
  7. To provide an environment in which the student recognizes the importance of community service as a part of the professional and Christian commitment.
  8. To provide a background for continuing learning for the graduate in both formal and continuing education arenas.

Curriculum Plans for Master’s in Science Nursing Programs

 

NURSING EDUCATION CURRICULUM BSN TO MSN TRACK

SEMESTER 1 (FALL)

NU 500    

Essentials of Advanced Health Assessment, Pathophysiology & Pharmacology (3-0-0)

    3

NU 515                                                       

Curriculum Development in Nursing (3-0-0)          

    3

NU 527

Research and Quality Methods in Evidence-Based Practice (3-0-0)

    3

 

                      

Credits (9-0-0)

    9

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SEMESTER 2 (SPRING)

MGT524    

Organizational Theory and Behavior (3-0-0) 

    3

NU 517                                                      

Testing and Evaluation (3-0-0)         

    3

NU 540

Teaching Nursing (3-0-0)

    3

NU 541 

Teaching Nursing Practicum I (0-0-2)     2

 

                      

Credits (9-0-2)

  11

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SEMESTER 3 (SUMMER)

NU 525    

Informatics and Healthcare Technology (3-0-0)

    3

NU 528     

Roles and Interpersonal Collaboration (3-0-0)

    3

NU 544

Teaching Nursing Practicum II (0-0-3)

    3

 

                      

Credits (6-0-3)

    9

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SEMESTER 4 (FALL II)

NU 503    

Current Issues in Nursing and Health Care (2-0-0)

    2

NU 546     

Teaching Practicum III (0-0-3)

    3

NU 619

Organizational Leadership & Health Policy for Advanced Nursing Practice (2-0-0)

    2

 

                      

Credits (4-0-3)

    7

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TOTAL CREDIT HOURS:  36  

TOTAL CLINICAL HOURS: 480

CLINICAL HOUR TO CREDIT HOUR CONVERSION: 60:1

NURSING EDUCATION PRACTICE

Nursing Education Practicum I - 120 hours per Practicum

Nursing Education Practicum II - 180 hours per Practicum

Nursing Education Practicum III - 180 hours per Practicum

 

NURSING EXECUTIVE LEADERSHIP CURRICULUM BSN TO MSN TRACK

SEMESTER 1 (FALL)

NU 500

Essentials of Advanced Health Assessment, Pathophysiology & Pharmacology (3-0-0)

     3

NU 527  

Research and Quality Methods in Evidenced-Based Practice (3-0-0)      3

AC 544    

Acct. for Managerial Decision Making (3-0-0)           

     3

 

                        

Credits (9-0-0)

     9

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SEMESTER 2 (SPRING)

MGT 524

Organizational Behavior and Processes (3-0-0)  

     3

NU 503  

Current Issues in Nursing and Healthcare (2-0-0)      2

NU 530    

Administration of Nursing Organizations (3-0-0)       

     3

NU 531 Administration of Nursing Practicum I (0-0-2)

     2

 

                        

Credits (8-0-2)

     10

 

 

 

 

 

 

SEMESTER 3 (SUMMER)

BA 519    

Data Analysis and Decision Modeling (3-0-0)

     3

NU 525 

Informatics and Healthcare Technology (3-0-0)      3

NU 528     

Leadership Roles and Interpersonal Collaboration (3-0-0)

     3

NU 534 Administration of Nursing Practicum II (0-0-3)

     3

 

                        

Credits (9-0-3)

     12

 

 

 

 

 

 

SEMESTER 4 (FALL II)

BA 597   

Financial Case Studies in Healthcare Organizations (3-0-0)

     3

NU 505 

Human and Financial Resources (3-0-0)      3

NU 536     

Administration of Nursing Practicum III (0-0-3)

     3

NU 619

Organizational Leadership & Health Policy for Advanced Nursing Practice (2-0-0)

     2

 

                        

Credits (8-0-3)

     11

 

 

 

 

 

 
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS:  42  
TOTAL CLINICAL HOURS: 480
CLINICAL HOUR TO CREDIT HOUR CONVERSION: 60:1
Executive Leadership Practicum I -120 hours per Practicum
Executive Leadership Practicum II - 180 hours per Practicum
Executive Leadership Practicum III - 180 hours per Practicum
 
 
FAMILY NURSE PRACTITIONER (FNP) CURRICULUM BSN TO MSN TRACK
 

SEMESTER 1 (FALL)

NU 507   

Advanced Health Assessment & Diagnostic Reasoning (3-1-0)

     4

NU 509  

Advanced Pharmacology (3-0-0)       3

NU 528     

Leadership Roles & Interpersonal Collaboration (3-0-0)  

     3

NU 619

Organizational Leadership & Health Policy for Advanced Nursing Practice (2-0-0)  

     2

 

                        

Credits (11-1-0)

     12

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SEMESTER 2 (SPRING)

NU 527   

Research and Quality Methods in Evidence Based Practice (3-0-0)

     3

NU 508

Advanced Pathophysiology (3-0-0)      3

NU 551     

Family Nurse Practitioner I (4-0-3) 

     7

 

                        

Credits (10-0-3)

     13

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SEMESTER 3 (SUMMER)

NU 501    

Theory and Ethics for Advanced Nursing Practice (3-0-0)

     3

NU 525

Informatics and Healthcare Technology (3-0-0)      3

NU 652     

Family Nurse Practitioner II (4-0-3) 

     7

 

                        

Credits (10-0-3)

     13

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SEMESTER 4 (FALL II)

NU 613     

Specialty Focus Practicum (0-0-2)  

     2

NU 626

Transitions to Advanced Nursing Practice (2-0-0)      2

NU 653     

Family Nurse Practitioner III (4-0-3) 

     7

 

                        

Credits (6-0-5)

     11

 

 

TOTAL CREDIT HOURS: 49 

TOTAL CLINICAL HOURS:  660 

CREDIT HOUR TO CLINICAL RATIO: 60:1            

 

FAMILY NURSE PRACTITIONER (FNP) CURRICULUM BSN TO MSN TRACK PART-TIME

 

SEMESTER 1 (FALL I)

NU 509  

Advanced Pharmacology (3-0-0)       3

NU 528     

Leadership Roles & Interpersonal Collaboration (3-0-0)  

     3

 

                        

Credits (6-0-0)

     6

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SEMESTER 2 (SPRING I)

NU 527   

Research and Quality Methods in Evidence Based Practice (3-0-0)

     3

NU 508

Advanced Pathophysiology (3-0-0)      3

 

                        

Credits (6-0-0)

     6

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SEMESTER 3 (SUMMER I)

NU 501    

Theory and Ethics for Advanced Nursing Practice (3-0-0)

     3

NU 525

Informatics and Healthcare Technology (3-0-0)      3

 

                        

Credits (6-0-0)

     6

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SEMESTER 1 (FALL II)

NU 507   

Advanced Health Assessment & Diagnostic Reasoning (3-1-0)

     4

NU 619

Organizational Leadership & Health Policy for Advanced Nursing Practice (2-0-0)  

     2

 

                        

Credits (5-1-0)

     6

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SEMESTER 2 (SPRING II)

NU 551     

Family Nurse Practitioner I (4-0-3) 

     7

 

                        

Credits (4-0-3)

     7

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SEMESTER 3 (SUMMER II)

NU 652     

Family Nurse Practitioner II (4-0-3) 

     7

 

                        

Credits (4-0-3)

     7

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SEMESTER 4 (FALL III)

NU 613     

Specialty Focus Practicum (0-0-2)  

     2

NU 626

Transitions to Advanced Nursing Practice (2-0-0)      2

NU 653     

Family Nurse Practitioner III (4-0-3) 

     7

 

                        

Credits (6-0-5)

     11

 

 

TOTAL CREDIT HOURS: 49 

TOTAL CLINICAL HOURS:  660 

CREDIT HOUR TO CLINICAL RATIO: 60:1 

 

 

POST-MASTER’S FAMILY NURSE PRACTITIONER (FNP) CURRICULUM

 

SEMESTER 1 (FALL)

NU 507   

Advanced Health Assessment & Diagnostic Reasoning (3-1-0)

     4

NU 509  

Advanced Pharmacology (3-0-0)       3

 

                        

Credits (6-1-0)

     7

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SEMESTER 2 (SPRING)

NU 508

Advanced Pathophysiology (3-0-0)      3

NU 551     

Family Nurse Practitioner I (4-0-3) 

     7

 

                        

Credits (7-0-3)

     10

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SEMESTER 3 (SUMMER)

NU 501    

Theory and Ethics for Advanced Nursing Practice (3-0-0)

     3

NU 652     

Family Nurse Practitioner II (4-0-3) 

     7

 

                        

Credits (7-0-3)

     10

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SEMESTER 4 (FALL II)

NU 613     

Specialty Focus Practicum (0-0-2)  

     2

NU 626

Transitions to Advanced Nursing Practice (2-0-0)      2

NU 653     

Family Nurse Practitioner III (4-0-3) 

     7

 

                        

Credits (6-0-5)

     11

 

 

TOTAL CREDIT HOURS: 38

TOTAL CLINICAL HOURS:  660 

CREDIT HOUR TO CLINICAL RATIO: 60:1      

 

Curriculum Plans for Doctor of Nursing Practice Programs

 

BSN to DNP NURSE PRACTITIONER TRACK

 

SEMESTER 1 (FALL I)

NU 507   

Advanced Health Assessment & Diagnostic Reasoning (3-1-0)

     4

NU 509  

Advanced Pharmacology (3-0-0)       3

NU 528     

Leadership Roles & Interpersonal Collaboration (3-0-0)  

     3

NU 619

Organizational Leadership & Health Policy for Advanced Nursing Practice (2-0-0)  

     2

 

                        

Credits (11-1-0)

     12

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SEMESTER 2 (SPRING I)

NU 527   

Research and Quality Methods in Evidence Based Practice (3-0-0)

     3

NU 508

Advanced Pathophysiology (3-0-0)      3

NU 551     

Family Nurse Practitioner I (4-0-3) 

     7

 

                        

Credits (10-0-3)

     13

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SEMESTER 3 (SUMMER I)

NU 501    

Theory and Ethics for Advanced Nursing Practice (3-0-0)

     3

NU 525

Informatics and Healthcare Technology (3-0-0)      3

NU 652     

Family Nurse Practitioner II (4-0-3) 

     7

 

                        

Credits (10-0-3)

     13

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SEMESTER 4 (FALL II)

NU 613     

Specialty Focus Practicum (0-0-2)  

     2

NU 626

Transitions to Advanced Nursing Practice (2-0-0)      2

NU 653     

Family Nurse Practitioner III (4-0-3) 

     7

 

                        

Credits (6-0-5)

     11

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SEMESTER 5 (SPRING II)

NU 701     

Scholarly Foundations for Advanced Practice (3-0-0)

     3

NU 729

Preventative Care for Populations (3-0-0)                                                                                                          3

NU 708   

Epidemiology (3-0-0)  

     3

 

                        

Credits (9-0-0)

     9

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SEMESTER 6 (SUMMER II)

NU 710   

Clinical Scholarship in Evidence-Based Practice (3-0-0)

     3

NU 703

Project Development (1-0-3)      4

 

                        

Credits (4-0-3)

     7

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SEMESTER 7 (FALL III)

NU 702    

Health Information Systems (3-0-0)   

     3

NU 705

Faith and Science (2-0-0)      2

NU 809     

Fellowship I (1-0-3)

     4

 

                        

Credits (6-0-3)

     9

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SEMESTER 8 (SPRING III)

NU 812   

Fellowship II (1-0-3)

     4

NU 815

Diversity and Social Issues in Health Care (3-0-0)      3

 

                        

Credits (4-0-3)

     7

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SEMESTER 9 (SUMMER III)

NU 712

Organizational Leadership and Quality Improvement in Healthcare (3-0-0)

     3

NU 830

Ethics and Health Care Policy Transformation and Economics (3-0-0)

     3

 

                        

Credits (6-0-0)

     6

 

 

 

 

TOTAL CREDIT HOURS: 87

TOTAL CLINICAL HOURS: 1200

CREDIT HOUR TO CLINICAL RATIO: 60:1

*NU 809 AND NU 812 may be taken up to three times in order to complete the required DNP project.

 

BSN TO DNP TRACK PART-TIME TRACK

SEMESTER 1 (FALL I)

NU 509  

Advanced Pharmacology (3-0-0)       3

NU 528     

Leadership Roles & Interpersonal Collaboration (3-0-0)  

     3

 

                        

Credits (6-0-0)

     6

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SEMESTER 2 (SPRING I)

NU 527   

Research and Quality Methods in Evidence Based Practice (3-0-0)

     3

NU 508

Advanced Pathophysiology (3-0-0)      3

 

                        

Credits (6-0-0)

     6

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SEMESTER 3 (SUMMER I)

NU 501    

Theory and Ethics for Advanced Nursing Practice (3-0-0)

     3

NU 525

Informatics and Healthcare Technology (3-0-0)      3

 

                        

Credits (6-0-0)

     6

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SEMESTER 1 (FALL II)

NU 507   

Advanced Health Assessment & Diagnostic Reasoning (3-1-0)

     4

NU 619

Health Policy for Advanced Nursing Practice (2-0-0)  

     2

 

                        

Credits (5-1-0)

     6

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SEMESTER 2 (SPRING II)

NU 551     

Family Nurse Practitioner I (4-0-3) 

     7

 

                        

Credits (4-0-3)

     7

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SEMESTER 3 (SUMMER II)

NU 652     

Family Nurse Practitioner II (4-0-3) 

     7

 

                        

Credits (4-0-3)

     7

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SEMESTER 4 (FALL III)

NU 613     

Specialty Focus Practicum (0-0-2)  

     2

NU 626

Transitions to Advanced Nursing Practice (2-0-0)      2

NU 653     

Family Nurse Practitioner III (4-0-3) 

     7

 

                        

Credits (6-0-5)

     11

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SEMESTER 5 (SPRING III)

NU 701     

Scholarly Foundations for Advanced Practice (3-0-0)

     3

NU 729

Preventative Care for Populations (3-0-0)                                                                                                          3

NU 708   

Epidemiology (3-0-0)  

     3

 

                        

Credits (9-0-0)

     9

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SEMESTER 6 (SUMMER III)

NU 710   

Clinical Scholarship in Evidence-Based Practice (3-0-0)

     3

NU 703

Project Development (1-0-3)      4

 

                        

Credits (4-0-3)

     7

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SEMESTER 7 (FALL IV)

NU 702    

Health Information Systems (3-0-0)   

     3

NU 705

Faith and Science (2-0-0)      2

NU 809     

Fellowship I (1-0-3)

     4

 

                        

Credits (6-0-3)

     9

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SEMESTER 8 (SPRING IV)

NU 812   

Fellowship II (1-0-3)

     4

NU 815

Diversity and Social Issues in Health Care (3-0-0)      3

 

                        

Credits (4-0-3)

     7

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SEMESTER 9 (SUMMER IV)

NU 712

Organizational Leadership and Quality Improvement in Healthcare (3-0-0)

     3

NU 830

Ethics and Health Care Policy Transformation and Economics (3-0-0)

     3

 

                        

Credits (6-0-0)

     6

 

 

 

 

TOTAL CREDIT HOURS: 87

TOTAL CLINICAL HOURS: 1200

CREDIT HOUR TO CLINICAL RATIO: 60:1

*NU 809 AND NU 812 may be taken up to three times in order to complete the required DNP project.

 

POST-MASTERS DNP TRACK

SEMESTER 7 (FALL I)

NU 702    

Health Information Systems (3-0-0)   

     3

NU 705

Faith and Science (2-0-0)      2

NU 712

Organizational Leadership and Quality Improvement in Healthcare (3-0-0)

     3

 

                        

Credits (8-0-0)

     8

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SEMESTER 5 (SPRING I)

NU 701     

Scholarly Foundations for Advanced Practice (3-0-0)

     3

NU 729

Preventative Care for Populations (3-0-0)                                                                                                          3

NU 708   

Epidemiology (3-0-0)  

     3

 

                        

Credits (9-0-0)

     9

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SEMESTER 6 (SUMMER I)

NU 710   

Clinical Scholarship in Evidence-Based Practice (3-0-0)

     3

NU 703

Project Development (1-0-3)      4

 

                        

Credits (4-0-3)

     7

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SEMESTER 7 (FALL II)

NU 809     

Fellowship I (1-0-3)

     4

NU 830

Ethics and Health Care Policy Transformation and Economics (3-0-0)

     3

 

                        

Credits (4-0-3)

     7

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SEMESTER 8 (SPRING II)

NU 812   

Fellowship II (1-0-3)

     4

NU 815

Diversity and Social Issues in Health Care (3-0-0)      3

 

                        

Credits (4-0-3)

     7

 

 

 

 

 

 

TOTAL CREDIT HOURS: 38

TOTAL CLINICAL HOURS: 540

CREDIT HOUR TO CLINICAL RATIO: 60:1

*NU 809 AND NU 812 may be taken up to three times in order to complete the required DNP project.

Standards and Documents Relevant to the Graduate Nursing Programs

Curricula for the graduate programs use the following standards of education and practice: The American Nurses’ Association Code of Ethics for Nurses with Interpretive Statements (ANA, 2016) and the Nursing: Scope and Standards of Practice, (ANA, 2015) as well as the Alabama Board of Nursing Practice Act and Administrative Code (2016). Specific standards of practice for each program include: The Essentials of Master’s Education in Nursing (AACN, 2011) and Criteria for Evaluation of Nurse Practitioner Programs (National Task Force on Quality Nurse Practitioner Education [NTF], 2016) and American Association of Colleges in Nursing (AACN; 2006). The Essentials of Doctoral Education for Advanced Nursing Practice. Standards of practice for clinical specialty areas are also incorporated, including core competencies put forth by organizations such as the National Organization of Nurse Practitioner Faculties (NONPF, 2016) that are integrated as appropriate.

The Master of Science degree program and Doctor of Nursing Practice degree program are guided by the following standards and documents, which are available online

American Association of Colleges in Nursing (AACN; 2016) Family Nurse Practitioner Competencies.

American Association of Colleges in Nursing (AACN; 2016). Criteria Evaluation of Nurse Practitioner Programs.

American Association of Colleges in Nursing (AACN; 2011). The Essentials of Master’s Education in Nursing.

American Nurses Association (ANA). 3rd edition (2015). Nursing: Standards and Scope of Practice. Washing, D.C., (http://www.Nursebooks.org).

American Organization of Nurse Executives (AONE; 2015) The AONE Nurse Executive Competencies.

Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE; 2016 Revision). Standards of Baccalaureate and Graduate Nursing Programs.

Criteria for Evaluation of Nurse Practitioner Programs (National Task Force on Quality Nurse Practitioner Education, 2016); NTF Criteria.

National League for Nursing (NLN; 2013 Revision). Scope of Practice for Academic Educators.

National Organization of Nurse Practitioner Faculties (NONPF) Criteria. (2016).

American Association of Colleges in Nursing (AACN; 2006). The Essentials of Doctoral Education for Advanced Nursing Practice.

Section III: Administrative Policies and Procedures

Address/Name Changes

It is important for The University to be able to locate and to send official correspondence to students. Students are required to notify the School of Nursing for address and name changes through the School of Nursing administrative assistant. It is the student’s responsibility to keep address and other directory information current.

Americans with Disabilities Act/Student Disability Services

The University of Mobile provides accommodations to enable students with disabilities to access The University community, in compliance with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 [29 U.S.C. 794(a)] and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA) [42 U.S.C. 12101, et seq.]. Reasonable accommodations are determined based on current documentation and are made on a case-by-case basis. Adherence to academic standards that are essential to a course of study is generally considered non-discriminatory. Students with disabilities are required to maintain the same level of responsibility for their education as other students attending The University of Mobile. These responsibilities including maintaining levels of academic performance expected of all students, meeting class requirements, maintaining appropriate behavior, and following The University’s policies and procedures.

Students requesting accommodations from The University of Mobile must self-identify by contacting the Center for Student Success. The University encourages students to request accommodations before the semester begins. If the student chooses to delay providing documentation and/or making a request for accommodations. The University of Mobile will not provide accommodations in a retroactive manner but will upon the student’s request begin the procedure for approving and implementing future accommodations. A reasonable amount of time will be necessary and expected in order for The University to implement these accommodations. Submitting an application for accommodations does not ensure that the student qualifies to receive accommodations.

The Center for Student Success determines the student’s eligibility for accommodations and, for eligible students, determines appropriate accommodation. The University of Mobile will provide reasonable accommodation as long as it does not fundamentally alter the nature of the program. In the event that a student is unable to fulfill admission and progression standards, with or without reasonable accommodation, the student will not be admitted into, or be allowed to progress in the School of Nursing.

The graduate nursing programs at The University of Mobile are mentally and physically rigorous and place specific requirements on the students enrolled in the programs. All graduate nursing students must be able to meet the Core Performance Standards (See Appendix B). In addition, students are expected to complete all the academic and clinical requirements of the graduate program in nursing before they are eligible to graduate and/or test with a national credentialing agency such as the American Academy of Nurse Practitioners (AANP) or the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC). The confidentially of all documents will be maintained in accordance with the applicable law.

CoreScreening and Magnus

The University of Mobile has contracted with CoreScreening and Magnus to gather and maintain records and other required documentation for graduate nursing students. All students must present documentation of all School of Nursing requirements to Magnus, the designated non-affiliated vendor for The University of Mobile School of Nursing. Each student will receive login information and instructions for submission of documents (immunizations, health history, etc.) and compliance tracking.

Students will receive an email to complete the background check with an expiration date of 14 days from receipt of the email. Students will be instructed on signing up for CoreScreening during or before orientation. Additionally, students will be provided information regarding how to log on and activate an account with Magnus. Within the Magnus account, students will be able to manage the requirements of the graduate program, complete tasks as directed to meet deadlines, upload and store important documents and records.

If students need assistance with their Magnus account, they should contact the Magnus Service Desk at 877.461. 6831 or by email at service@magnushealthportal.com.

Commencement

Degree-seeking graduate students are expected to complete all requirements for graduation in order to participate in commencement. Master of Science (MS) and Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) degrees are awarded to nursing students who have completed all required courses and clinical requirements in their respective curricula and are students in good standing at The University. Students enrolled in a graduate nursing program at The University of Mobile are required to maintain a cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 3.0 in all courses taken toward the degree. Students must have a GPA of 3.0 or higher in order to graduate from any graduate nursing program.

Students must submit an application for graduation to the Registrar’s Office during the semester prior to graduation. The deadline for this application is published each semester on The University website.

Confidentiality and HIPAA

The faculty and staff of The University of Mobile School of Nursing recognizes the importance of protecting the private and confidential information of patients/clients, their families, employees, staff and peers as well as the operation(s) of agencies within which the faculty and students’ practice.

It is the legal and ethical responsibility of every student to abide by the laws relative to privacy including the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA) guidelines. HIPAA regulations require providers to protect patient confidentiality in all forms - oral, written, and electronic. All information pertaining to patients/clients is considered confidential. Students must agree to abide by the regulations promulgated by the American Recovery and Investment Act of 2009 (HITECH or Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act) as applicable to each clinical agency used for clinical laboratory experience.

HIPAA regulations provide serious civil and criminal penalties for violation. Civil penalties can be as high as $25,000 per violation. Even unintentional disclosure can involve serious penalties.

All nursing faculty and nursing students agree to:

  • Adhere to HIPAA and HITECH guidelines.
  • Read, understand, and comply with confidentiality and privacy policies in each clinical experience.
  • Access, use or share confidential information only as it is essential and allowed by law. All printouts, photocopies, written and electronic information produced for use during a clinical shift must be secured at all times and destroyed prior to the end of that clinical shift. Notes and work products, necessary for academic requirements, must have all identifiers removed.
  • Never release protected health information to any unidentified source.
  • Avoid discussion or disclosure of patient information outside of the academic setting. This includes, but is not limited to, areas of public and social gatherings, on-line social networking, social media, blogs, and any areas specified by the policy of the clinical setting. Students should never talk about patients/clients in public, avoiding conversations in elevators, dining facilities, and in situations where others may overhear.
  • Avoid leaving patient/client records or information where unauthorized persons might see them. No part of the medical record, or duplication thereof, may be removed from the clinical setting. At all times, the medical record must be secured according to the clinical setting’s policy.
  • Avoid the use of patient/client’s names using initials only.
  • Immediately report to the clinical and course faculty any incident or suspected incidents of unauthorized access and/or disclosure of protected health information.

Communicating with Faculty

Students are encouraged to stay connected to their faculty advisors and course faculty. Faculty members are available to provide assistance with concerns related to course content, examinations, and writing assignments.

Several resources are available for students to communicate with faculty. Most faculty and staff are on The University of Mobile voice mail system. If the individual you are attempting to contact does not answer the telephone, the voice mail system is activated, and students may leave a succinct message regarding the purpose of your call. In addition, leave your full name, telephone number, and a time that may be convenient to return your call. It will be important that you speak slow and distinctly as you leave your information. A listing of these numbers is provided in the faculty directory on the School of Nursing website.

All faculty and staff maintain a University of Mobile email account. Students may email faculty and these addresses are published in the faculty directory on the School of Nursing website. With any email communication, include your full name and course number.

Core Performance Standards

A candidate for a graduate nursing degree must possess abilities and skills, which include the Core Performance Standards (See Appendix B). The Core Performance Standards are the cognitive, psychomotor, and affective learning skills needed by the student to meet program objectives and requirements. The use of a trained intermediary is not acceptable in that a candidate’s judgment must be mediated by someone else’s power of observation, selection, and assessment.

CPR-AED/BLS Certification

Current infant, adult, and child CPR certification must be maintained during enrollment and submitted after each renewal process. The copy of the card must include the front and back, and the back must be signed. The course must be the American Heart Association Healthcare Provider or American Red Cross Basic Life Support. The proof of CPR certification must be uploaded to and approved by Magnus in order for the student to participate in graduate clinical learning experiences.

Criminal Background Check Policy and Procedure

The School of Nursing recognizes its role in maintaining a safe environment for students and patients/clients. Health care agencies require employees and students to meet local and state regulations. Therefore, a background check is required for all graduate nursing students enrolled in the School of Nursing. Certain arrests or convictions, which could jeopardize the health and safety of patients, may render a student ineligible for placement in a clinical agency. Ineligibility for placement in a clinical agency to perform nursing care for completion of clinical objectives will result in course failure and dismissal from graduate nursing programs.

Joint Commission guidelines mandate criminal background checks on all employees, volunteers and students. Additionally, healthcare agencies are requiring background checks and drug testing for graduate nursing students working in clinical settings. Therefore, all graduate nursing students entering the School of Nursing will consent to and complete a certified criminal background check (See Appendix C). Failure to submit a certified criminal background check will suspend the matriculation process and/or enrollment in any graduate courses.

The Criminal Background Check will include a local and national review of relevant records including county of residence criminal records, residence history, Social Security alert, nationwide sexual offender registry, and nationwide healthcare fraud and abuse scan.

Background Checks

  • New students: Matriculation will be conditional on completion of a criminal background check. Students may also be required to have additional checks once enrolled in the program. The School of Nursing must certify to clinical agencies, where students participate in clinical activities, that each student has had a negative background check with no adverse finding.
  • Matriculated students: Supplemental or additional background checks may be required to meet the requirements of a clinical agency. Once enrolled in the Graduate Program, students are compelled to disclosure any legal or criminal convictions or arrests within a three (3) day period.

Consequences for a Criminal History

  • If a criminal background report indicates any positive criminal history, the Graduate Program Chair and the Dean of the School of Nursing will send a letter to the student requesting a written explanation of the indicated incident(s).
  • If the student challenges the information in the report as erroneous, the Dean of the School of Nursing will ask CoreScreening to investigate further to determine whether the information is accurate.
  • If the student responds that the positive criminal history report is accurate, the Graduate Program Chair and the Dean of the School of Nursing will notify the student in writing that they will be unable to attend the School of Nursing and withdrawal from the graduate nursing program is mandated.
  • Students who have been convicted of a felony or have pled nolo contendere to a felony or a crime involving moral turpitude, are ineligible for clinical placement and are deemed unable to complete program requirements.

A student who engages in illegal and/or immoral activities and/or who exhibits unprofessional conduct which directly or indirectly endangers the health or well-being of another will be subject to dismissal from the program.

The criminal background report will be held in the strictest confidence; only those individuals who have a need to know related to the student’s enrollment and academic progress (e.g. clinical agency placement) will have access to this information.

Disclosure of Legal/Criminal Convictions and Arrests

Students enrolled in a graduate nursing program must report any arrests or legal/criminal convictions including, but not limited to, misdemeanors, felonies, sexual offender convictions or government sanctions. If a student is convicted of any criminal offense(s) other than minor traffic violations subsequent to the criminal background check(s) obtained under this policy, the student is required to report the incident within three (3) days after such conviction to the Dean of the School of Nursing supplying the date, nature of the conviction, and the court location. Failure to report arrests or legal convictions will result in automatic and immediate dismissal from the School of Nursing. The student will be ineligible to be re-admitted to any University of Mobile graduate nursing program.

Drug Screen Policy and Procedure

Alcohol abuse and drug use can adversely influence the learning environment and impair an individual’s judgment and decision-making capabilities preventing safe delivery of care in any healthcare setting. The School of Nursing has a vital interest in maintaining a safe and healthy environment for its students as well as the patients/clients it serves. Any student under the influence of a drug or alcohol during clinical may pose serious safety and health risks, not only to themselves, but to the patients/clients they are providing care to.

As a result of Joint Commission guidelines, healthcare agencies require drug testing for graduate nursing students working in clinical settings. Therefore, all graduate nursing students entering the School of Nursing will consent to and complete random drug testing (See Appendix D). Failure to submit a drug screen will suspend the matriculation process and/or enrollment in any graduate courses.

Admitted students will not be allowed to progress in coursework without completion of a negative drug screen. A negative drug screen is defined as absence of any cannabinoids, cocaine, opiates, phencyclidine, or amphetamines in the student’s urine.

Drug Screening

  • New students: Matriculation will be conditional on completion of a urine drug screen. Students may also be required to have additional checks once enrolled in the program. The School of Nursing must certify to clinical agencies, where students participate in clinical activities, that each student has had a negative drug screen.
  • Matriculated students: Supplemental or additional urine drug screens may be required to meet the requirements of a clinical agency.

Consequences for Positive Drug Test

  • If the student’s drug screen is positive, the laboratory medical director will contact the student requesting written proof of a prescription for the appropriate medication. Students who are unable to produce a prescription to substantiate legal usage of the medication will be dismissed from the School of Nursing graduate program.

Students Found to be Under the Influence of Illicit Drugs and/or Alcohol

Each student is expected to uphold and demonstrate professional and personal moral standards. The faculty subscribes to the intent of The University policy prohibiting the illegal possession, use or distribution of drugs and/or alcohol by students on university property or as a part of any university activity (on or off campus). Underage drinking is illegal.

Students manifesting behaviors in clinical settings including but not limited to, alcohol on breath, pupillary changes, slurred speech, motor incapacities, or other signs and/or physical symptoms suggesting impairment, will be questioned by nursing faculty or preceptor. If, in the faculty member’s or preceptor’s judgment, it is reasonable to believe that an impairment exists, then the student will be asked to leave the clinical setting immediately. The student may be asked to submit a random drug screen at the time of the incident. A family member or friend will be contacted to provide safe transportation for the student away from the clinical site.

Students in the School of Nursing must comply with the legal, moral and legislative standards in accordance with the Alabama Board of Nursing Administrative Code. A student who engages in illegal and/or immoral activities and/or who exhibits unprofessional conduct which directly or indirectly endangers the health or well-being of another will be subject to dismissal from the program.

Reasonable Suspension of Drug/Alcohol Use
In addition to the pre-clinical screening process for substance abuse, for the protection of patients, faculty, staff, and students, the School of Nursing has the right to require a student to submit to testing for substance abuse at the student’s expense when a faculty member or preceptor has reasonable cause to believe the student is under the influence of alcohol or other drugs including:

  1. Abnormal conduct or erratic behavior, absenteeism, tardiness or deterioration in performance.
  2. Evidence of tampering with a drug test.
  3. Information that the student has caused or contributed to harm of self, visitors, staff, or a patient/client while under the influence of drugs.
  4. Evidence of involvement in the use, possession, sale, or solicitation of drugs.
  5. Alcohol on breath, pupillary changes, slurred speech, motor incapacities, or other signs and/or physical symptoms suggesting impairment.

Confidentiality
The criminal background report and/or status of the drug screen will be held in the strictest confidence; only those individuals who have a need to know related to the student’s enrollment and academic progress (e.g. clinical agency placement) will have access to this information.

E-Mail Policy

All University of Mobile official communications with the student will be provided through the University email address that is assigned to the student upon official admission and enrollment. All official information including but not limited to, student billing, faculty-student communications, course registration, financial aid information, student handbook changes, etc. will be sent to the students email address representing official notification. The University accepts no responsibility, for any forwarding of email that the student may choose from their official University email account. The University is only responsible for ensuring that email gets to the student’s email account that is maintained by the University. All students are responsible for monitoring their University email account at least twice daily.

Only official University of Mobile email addresses will be used for communication by the School of Nursing.

Health History

Each student must complete a health history form on the Magnus website annually. Students without a complete health history form will not be permitted to begin their clinical rotations, resulting in immediate course withdrawal.

Immunizations

Healthcare workers, including students participating in clinical experiences, are at risk for contracting a variety of communicable diseases. The Center for Disease Control (CDC) has specific recommendations for healthcare workers, in addition to the usual adult immunization requirements, to better protect healthcare workers and the populations they serve.

The University of Mobile School of Nursing requires its graduate students to provide validation of certain immunizations and/or immunities prior to the start of the clinical component and prior to clinical placements. All clinical sites require proof of immunizations and/or immunities prior to clinical placement.

Students who fail to provide proof of required immunizations and/or proof of immunity will not be permitted to participate in clinical experiences that are necessary for program completion. Furthermore, some clinical agencies may require additional immunizations in addition to those required by the School of Nursing.

Required Immunizations

Measles, Mumps, & Rubella (MMR) One of the following is required: two (2) vaccinations or positive antibody titer for all 3 components or documentation by a medical provider of an allergic reaction. If the titer is negative or equivocal, vaccinations are required.
Tetanus, Diphtheria, and Pertussis
(Tdap)
Documentation of Tdap within the last ten (10) years or documentation by a medical provider of an allergic reaction. The next action date will be set for ten (10) years from the administered date of the vaccine.
Hepatitis B series One of the following is required: three (3) vaccinations or positive antibody titer or documentation by a medical provider of an allergic reaction. If the series is in process, the next action date will be set accordingly. If the titer is negative or equivocal, additional vaccinations are required.
Varicella One of the following is required: two (2) vaccinations or positive antibody titer or documentation by a medical provider of an allergic reaction. If the titer is negative or equivocal, additional vaccinations are required.
Tuberculosis A PPD-Mantoux test (one step) is required annually. If PPD is positive, or student has previous history of a positive tuberculin skin test, a normal chest x-ray is required within 12 months, unless history of INH therapy is documented. Repeat chest x-rays are not needed unless student displays symptoms or signs of TB or a health care practitioner recommends a repeat chest x-ray. The health care provider performing the annual physical should screen for signs and symptoms of TB.

A student may choose to do a blood test, QuantiFERON Gold, instead of a PPD. If the blood test is positive for TB, the student must provide written documentation from a healthcare provider defining treatment and release to work in a clinical setting.

This is an annual requirement for all nursing students
Annual influenza (Flu) vaccine Submission of documentation of a flu shot administered for the current flu season or documentation by a medical provider of an allergic reaction. The next action date will be set for one (1) year.
COVID-19 vaccine This vaccination is not a requirement of the University of Mobile. However, the vaccine and current booster may be required by the clinical site. Students are required to follow hospital/clinic policies regarding vaccinations.

Waiver of Receipt of Required Immunizations
If a student is unable to receive the required immunizations due to a medical contraindication, they must provide documentation by a licensed healthcare provider that they are unable to fulfill the requirement. Students may not provide waiver documentation from a family member or a close relative. Approval of waivers are the ultimate responsibility of each individual clinical site. If the student’s waiver is not approved, the student will be required to either comply with the facility’s requirements or find another clinical site.

Uploading Relevant Information to Magnus
Students are supplied with detailed instructions on how to submit the completed documents to the online service known as Magnus where student information and health records are confidentially maintained. Submitted materials are reviewed to verify that the student is eligible for participation in clinical courses. No student will be permitted in a clinical agency without submission of a waiver or completely fulfilling the immunization requirements.

Lost and Found

Any articles found in the nursing building should be given to the School of Nursing administrative assistant. If a student has lost any item, an inquiry should be made to Robin Anderson at 251.442.2253 or email randerson@umobile.edu

Netiquette

Netiquette describes professional communication and behaviors for online communication and interaction, email, discussion board postings, chats, blogs, etc., to ensure a forum for dynamic and engaged learning. The expectations for netiquette are that all students are respectful and courteous in all communications. Teaching and learning processes work best with free and open exchange of ideas, yet in an electronic setting, without the benefit of facial expressions, body language or tonal cues, miscommunication and misunderstanding may occur. Students should demonstrate respect and courtesy by welcoming dissenting opinions, respecting personal privacy, and/or creating or maintaining a culture of civility.

Conduct in the online setting is as important as face-to-face interaction. Appropriate communication contributes to the perception of professionalism. Students should:

  • Have honest and kind communication.
  • Use clear, concise, and appropriate language.
  • Use proper titles to address others (for example, Dr. Smith or Professor Jones).
  • Be thoughtful, judicious, and professional about the use of emotions, sarcasm, jokes, or humor.
  • Re-read, proof, and edit communications and discussion board postings before uploading and sending.
  • Compose written communication, discussion board posts, or other online assignments offline before posting.

Examplify

Examplify® is the student interface for ExamSoft®, The School of Nursing’s computer-based testing software. Students complete all exams using Examplify®. Each student must have a personal laptop that meets the minimum system requirements below. Each student must then download Examplify® on to his/her personal devices. Students are expected to install Examplify® on their personal laptop prior to attending orientation.

Examplify: Minimum System Requirements for Windows

Examplify cannot be used on virtual operating systems such as Microsoft’s Virtual Machine, Parallels, VMware, VMware Fusion or any other virtual environments.

For exam taking best practices: (including disabling antivirus programs), click Here!

  • Operating System: 32-bit and 64-bit Versions of Windows 7, Windows 8, and Windows 10.
  • All Windows 10 Creators versions, including the Spring 1803 update are now supported with Examplify version 1.5.0.
  • Alternate versions of Windows 10, such as Windows RT, and Windows 10 S are NOT supported at this time.
  • Only genuine, U.S.-English versions of Windows Operating Systems are supported
  • ExamSoft does not support Tablet devices other than Surface Pro as detailed below
  • CPU Processor: 1.86Ghz Intel Core 2 Duo or greater
  • RAM: highest recommended for the operating system or 2GB
  • Hard Drive: highest recommended for the operating system or 1GB of available space
  • For onsite support, a working USB port is required (Newer devices may require an adaptor)
  • Internet connection for Examplify Download, Registration, Exam Download and Upload
  • For technical troubleshooting, account passwords, including BitLocker keys, may be required.
  • Screen Resolution must be 1024x768 or higher

For instructions on how to check your computer’s specifications, click Here!

Surface Pro Requirements:

  • Surface Pro, Surface Books, and Surface Laptop devices are supported (Non-Pro Surface devices are NOT supported)
  • Must be running a supported Operating System (See PC Requirements above)
  • An external keyboard (USB or Bluetooth) is required. Bluetooth keyboards must be paired prior to launching exam
  • Hard Drive: 1GB or higher available space
  • For onsite support, a working USB port is required (Newer devices may require an adaptor)
  • Internet connection for Examplify Download, Registration, Exam Download and Upload
  • Screen Resolution must be 1920x1080

Examplify: Minimum System Requirements for Mac OS X

Examplify can be used on most modern Mac OS X based computers (i.e. purchased within the last 3-4 years). Please see specific system requirements as noted below.

Examplify cannot be used on virtual operating systems such as Microsoft’s Virtual Machine, Parallels, VMware, VMware Fusion or any other virtual environments.

For exam taking best practices, click here!

In order to use Examplify on your Apple Macbook, Macbook Air, or Macbook Pro natively, you must have:

  • Internet connection for Examplify Download, Registration, Exam Download and Upload
  • For onsite support, a working USB port is required (Newer devices may require an adapter)
  • For technical troubleshooting, account passwords, including device passwords, may be required.
  • Server version of Mac OS X is not supported
  • Screen Resolution must be 1024 x 768 or higher
  • Operating System:
    • Mac OS X 10.9 Mavericks
    • Mac OS X 10.10 Yosemite
    • Mac OS X 10.11 El Capitan
    • Mac OS X 10.12 Sierra
    • Mac OS X 10.13 High Sierra is supported!
  • Hard Drive = 1 GB or higher free disk space
  • RAM = 2 GB
  • CPU = Intel processor
  • Touchbars are supported

University of Mobile Online Exam Policy

Testing Area:

  • Sit at a clean desk or table if available. In the event a desk is not available, you may utilize a seating bench (not on the bed or floor).
  • Maintain room lighting bright enough to be considered “daylight” quality. Overhead lighting is preferred; however, if overhead is not possible, the source of light should not be behind the test taker.
  • Be sure the desk or table is cleared of all other materials. This means the removal of all books, papers, notebooks, calculators, etc. is necessary unless specifically permitted in posted guidelines for that particular examination.
  • Choose a room for testing that has only one door that is visible throughout the testing period. The door should remain closed throughout the exam.
  • No other computer monitors, screens, phones, or tablets should be on during the exam.
  • No watches (any type) are allowed to be worn during the testing period or in the testing
  • You may not utilize ear buds, headphones, or any other type of audio device during testing.
  • If a technical issue with accessing the exam, a cell phone may be used to contact the faculty member or technical staff during the exam. Cell phones should be brought into the testing environment in case the need arises to contact faculty/staff. The phone must be stored out of view, either face down on the floor beneath the desk/table or in a pocket, with all ringers, alarms, and notifications silenced.
  • No writing should be visible on the desk or walls.
  • No test items should be copied, saved or shared during or following the exam.
  • Screenshots of test information are prohibited.
  • The following should not be on the desktop and/or used during the exam unless explicitly stated by the faculty:
    • Excel
    • Word
    • PowerPoint
    • Textbooks
    • Websites
    • Calculators
    • Cell Phones
    • iPads/Tablets 
      All other materials and computer programs are prohibited.
  • Do not have a radio or television playing in the background.
  • Do not talk during the exam.
  • No other persons except the test‐taker should be permitted to enter the room during testing.
  • You will be required to show a 360-degree view of the environment at the beginning and end of each examination. It is permissible for a student to use a mirror to show the testing environment behind, and on the desktop surface in front of, the computer screen (including above and on the floor in front of the student) rather than physically moving a laptop or desktop camera. (Show the camera the back of the mirror before you start.)

Behavior:

  • Dress as if in a public setting.
  • You may not eat or drink during the exam.
  • Do not leave the room during the testing period at any time, unless specifically permitted in posted guidelines for that particular examination. Do not take the computer into another room to finish testing (exam must be completed in the same room the “Exam Environment View” is completed in).

Policy Violation Consequences

  • Students are required to adhere to the protocol as listed above. Each exam and quiz will be reviewed for policy violations. Any minor and major violation may result in several consequences ranging from student notifications to reporting possible honor code violations to the Graduate Committee which could result in dismissal from the program.
  • If a student deviates from this policy during the exam, as soon as the student completes the exam, the student must email the instructor explaining the nature of the policy violation. Failure to do so could result in an allegation of violation of the Honor Code.
  • If the student’s explanation for the deviation and the instructor’s review reveals a reasonably innocent explanation, the instructor will resolve the deviation with student. The intent is to allow the student a chance to modify behavior to comply with this policy in order to prevent future flags and to avoid possible punitive action. A student who receives multiple flags may be reported to the Honor Council for suspected violation of the Honor Code.
  • If the explanation for the deviation is unsatisfactory, the instructor at his/her discretion may report the student to the Graduate Committee for review.
  • Whether or not the exam was flagged by ExamMonitor, if the student is suspected of a violation of the Honor Code, the student will be contacted directly by course faculty. If an honor violation occurred or there is concern of a violation, the Honor Code policies will be followed.

Failure to perform the pre-exam steps above will result in a “0” (zero) on the exam.

Professional Conduct

Nursing professionalism is comprised of behaviors, practices, and communication styles that demonstrate core values of nurses working to achieve optimal health outcomes in patients, families, and communities. This includes conduct that applies the principles of excellence, caring, ethics, respect, communication, and accountability. Students learn these principles through self-assessment, responsible learning, effective communication, and continuous professional engagement.

A student who engages in illegal and/or immoral activities and/or who exhibit unprofessional conduct which directly or indirectly endangers the health or well-being of another will be subject to dismissal from the Graduate Nursing Program.

Purpose of a Syllabus

The course syllabus is designed by the instructor as a course guide and learning aid for the student. The syllabus is not intended to be construed as a contract, either expressed or implied. The instructor reserves the right to alter the syllabus as indicated. Students will be notified by email of any changes or modifications to the course calendar or course requirements as specified in the syllabus.

School of Nursing Location and Hours of Operation

The School of Nursing is located on the third floor of Weaver Hall. The School of Nursing is open from 7:30 AM until 5:30 PM, Monday through Thursday.

Social Media/Networking Policy

The definition of social media is broad and constantly evolving. The term generally refers to internet-based tools that allow individuals to communicate; to share information, ideas, personal messages, images and in some cases, to collaborate with other users in real time. Social media is also referred to as social networking. Social media and networking include but are not limited to:

  • Blogs, and micro-blogs such as Twitter
  • Social networks, such as Facebook
  • Professional networks, such as LinkedIn
  • Video sharing, such as YouTube, Second Life, and vlogs (video logs)
  • Audio sharing, such as podcasts
  • Photo sharing, such as Flickr, Instagram, and Photobucket
  • Social bookmarking, such as Digg and Redditt
  • User created web pages such as Wikis and Wikipedia, and
  • Any other internet-based social media/social networking application similar in purpose or function to those applications described above.

All University of Mobile School of Nursing graduate students must adhere to regulations provided by HIPAA, HITECH, ANA Code of Ethics, and assigned clinical agencies policies regarding any usage of electronic devices in or out of the clinical or classroom setting.

  • Permission may be granted by nursing faculty or assigned preceptors to use electronic devices for enhancing learning in the classroom or patient care environment.

Some electronic communication, networking and/or postings are subject to public view; therefore, students are responsible for all content and are subject to disciplinary action if they engage in misuse or abuse. Misuse of electronic devices includes but may not be all inclusive:

  • Patient information
  • Communication or postings of illegal, obscene, defamatory and/or slanderous statements
  • Postings of obscene photos or videos
  • Discrediting of any person(s) or group(s)

Students enrolled in the School of Nursing Graduate Program are expected to be compliant with the social media/networking policy. Appropriate and professional behaviors include:

  • Maintain ethically prescribed professional boundaries surrounding the nursepatient relationship in the online environment in addition to the classroom.
  • Follow HIPAA guidelines at all times. Identifiable information concerning patients/clinical rotations must not be posted in any online forum or webpage.
  • Report promptly any identified breach of confidentiality of privacy to faculty or other appropriate authority.
  • Avoid transmitting or placing online individually identifiable patient information.
  • Protect confidential, sensitive, and proprietary information. Do not post confidential or proprietary information about The University, staff, students, patients/clients, clinical facilities, or others with whom one has contact in the role of a University of Mobile nursing student.
  • Practice restraint when disclosing personal information on social networking sites. Even seemingly innocuous pictures and comments can impact the respect and trust patients and others have for University of Mobile graduate nursing students.
  • When posting your point of view, neither claim nor imply that you are speaking on The University of Mobile’s behalf, unless you are authorized to do so in writing.
  • Understand that patients/clients, colleagues, peers, institutions, and employers may view postings.

In accordance with the ANA Code of Ethics, it would be inappropriate and unprofessional for a graduate student to:

  • Engage in communication with patients/clients and their family members on social networking sites.
  • Post on behalf of The University of Mobile School of Nursing or as an official representative of the School of Nursing without written approval.
  • Take any pictures in any clinical, laboratory, or practice site without written approval.
  • Share, post, or transmit any personal information, health information, or images by way of electronic media. Sharing this information is a violation of patient’s rights to confidentiality and privacy.

Considerations

  • Students are legally liable for what is posted on their own site and on the sites of others. If in doubt, practice professional restraint and don’t post.
  • Privacy does not exist in the world of social media/social networking. Consider the consequences if a post becomes widely known and how it may reflect on you personally as well as The University of Mobile and the School of Nursing.
  • Consider the professional image you want to present and make sure that any content you post is consistent with your professional goals.

Social Media/Networking Policy Misuse Disciplinary Actions
Any violation of this policy throughout the student’s clinical, skills labs, classroom learning experiences, and online learning opportunities and may result in disciplinary action and/or immediate dismissal from the School of Nursing.

Students who share confidential information are at risk of disciplinary action including course failure and/or dismissal from the program. Additionally, there may be legal ramifications for students who breach institutional confidentiality agreements.

  1. First policy violation:
    • Notification of the incident to the Graduate Program Chair and the Dean.
    • One-on-one meeting with the course faculty.
    • Review of the School of Nursing Social Media/Networking Policy.
    • Actions may result in immediate dismissal from the School of Nursing.
  2. Second policy violation:
    • One-on-one meeting with the Graduate Program Chair.
    • Review of said infraction and status in the School of Nursing.
    • Actions may result in immediate dismissal from the School of Nursing.
  3. Third policy violation:
    • Immediate dismissal from the School of Nursing.

Standard Precautions

Due to the nature of the practice of nursing, students may come in contact with patients or specimens capable of causing disease. It is imperative that appropriate infection control techniques and precautions be followed. Appropriate standard precautions and needle and sharp precautions, as defined by the Centers for Disease Control are adhered to by the School of Nursing. In order to limit transmission of blood borne diseases, students are not permitted to perform invasive procedures on themselves or other students in the Nursing Skills Lab. Invasive procedures include, but not limited to, any form of injection or venipuncture. Additionally, students may not practice invasive procedures on themselves, other students, faculty, or agency staff in the clinical setting. Students are permitted to perform invasive procedures only in clinical care settings on patients with direct supervision of licensed personnel.

Despite careful and conscientious practice of standard precautions, it cannot be guaranteed that students will not be exposed to blood or body fluids.

All students should read and adhere to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Basic Infection Prevention and Control and Worker Guidelines at www.cdc.gove/infectioncontrol/guidelines/index.html.

General Procedure Following Exposure, Illness, or Injury 
If an exposure/illness/injury occurs during student experiences, the student is responsible for immediately reporting the incident to clinical faculty and to the agency where the incident occurred. The initial care following any injury, illness, or exposure to blood or body fluid should be the same procedure used for employees of the clinical agency. Regardless of the place for providing initial care, agency or private medical provider, the student or the student’s insurance carrier will be responsible for any and all charges incurred. The post-exposure or follow-up care should be conducted by the student’s choice of private medical provider. All students are encouraged to maintain health insurance.

Student ID Badges

All students are required to have an official University of Mobile School of Nursing photo I.D. badge as a means of identification. The photo ID badge should be worn at all times while at a clinical site and be visible on the student’s lab coat at clinical sites.

Student Leave of Absence

The faculty recognizes the nature and the pace of the graduate nursing programs are rigorous and demanding. There may be times when the student’s personal, family, financial, medical, or work situation may require an interruption in the planned course of study. The student requesting a leave of absence must 1) submit a written request for a leave of absence, 2) confer with the course faculty and the Graduate Program Chair, and 3) follow readmission application policy for the graduate nursing program.

Technology and Computer Requirements

All graduate nursing programs program are distance-mediated programs offered online through a learning management system (LMS). The University of Mobile currently utilizes Canvas as the University’s online learning platform.

The mechanism of delivery for graduate nursing programs will be as an asynchronous online/distance education program. The family nurse practitioner tracks will also include mandatory on-campus intensives throughout the curriculum.

Participation in online courses requires the student to have access to a computer and the ability to send and receive email. The University of Mobile provides an email account for every student. Your professors must be able to correspond with you through email and may require you to communicate with your classmates through email. Course faculty and clinical preceptors will use your University student email account for all email communication unless otherwise specified.

By enrolling in an online course, the student is granting the faculty permission to post their name and email address on the course website and otherwise distribute that information to other students in the class.

University of Mobile’s network enables access to external facilities, systems, and other networks over which The University of Mobile has no control, including capabilities, which are incidental to providing such access. Some of these resources may not support The University of Mobile’s goals and objectives. Although the University of Mobile does not exercise editorial or censorship control of such external resources, The University of Mobile expects that technology will not be used for purposes, which are immoral, illegal, or inconsistent with The University’s mission. The University of Mobile Information Technology Department monitors faculty and student for spam email.

Inappropriate uses of technology include but are not limited to those specifically prohibited by local, state, or federal law. Without limitation, examples of inappropriate uses of technology include:

  • Sending of harassing, threatening, or obscene material to minors and/or nonconsenting adults or any attempts to confuse or frustrate another user in achieving their objectives.
  • Random or unauthorized bulk sending or mailing of messages.
  • Inappropriate use of access.
  • Unauthorized release of information and viewing of University of Mobile’s data outside of institutional objectives.
  • Any disregard for the security mechanisms that are in place or other attempts to gain unauthorized access to technical resources. This includes possession of or attempts to acquire another user’s password or allowing others access to technology resources that are not allocated for their use;
  • Malicious transmission of a computer virus.

Students are expected to:

  • Utilize the University email system as the primary means of communication for University issues between the student, faculty, and staff. To ensure a quality learning experience, students are expected to check their email at least twice daily and respond to faculty with 48 hours of an initial email.
  • Practice good netiquette throughout each course by demonstrating respect.
  • Assure that computer hardware and required software is installed.
  • Assume a self-motivated, independent, and engaged learning role.
  • Meet course deadlines.
  • Maintain confidentiality regarding information communicated related to patients, employers, and other students.
  • Obtain course work missed due to interruption in internet service or technology failure. Extension of assignment deadlines will be considered at the discretion of the faculty.

Given the nature of online learning, and in consideration of the software programs required for students in the graduate nursing program, the following is a list of minimum computer specifications. Please ensure that your computer meets or exceeds these requirements, and that you have access to all required software and hardware components.

Component Minimum Requirement
PC User OS Windows 10 or higher
Mac User OS X Intel processor, OS X version 10.11.6
Internet Broadband connection strongly recommended
RAM 4GB RAM
Compatible Web Browser Google Chrome
Hardware Speaker, Webcam
Desktop Software (for PC or Mac Hardware) Microsoft Office 2010 or higher, Word, PowerPoint, Excel, Adobe Reader

The University of Mobile emphasizes the ability to utilize computer skills alone with various software packages in the educational setting. Computer skills needed to succeed in the nursing program include word processing along with the use of internet and email. Microsoft Word and Google Chrome are recommended.

Tobacco Use and Smoking Policy

The School of Nursing has a vital interest in maintaining a safe and healthy environment for its students as well as maintaining safe and healthful conditions for its patients/clients. Nursing students are not permitted to use tobacco products, including electronic cigarettes, when acting as a representative of the School of Nursing. This includes, but is not limited to, any clinical function, any time the student is in professional dress wearing their monogrammed lab jacket. Students are not permitted to smoke or use tobacco in any format when attending a professional function required by the School of Nursing.

Transportation Requirements

Students are responsible for arranging their own transportation to all required on-campus visits including on-campus intensives and to all clinical practice sites. Additionally, releasing The University of Mobile and the School of Nursing and/or affiliated institutions from liability for any accidents in which they may be involved while traveling to and from these learning experiences.

Typhon Electronic Student Tracking System

Students enrolled in graduate nursing programs are required to utilize the Typhon Nurse Practitioner Student Tracking System (NPST) software in all clinical courses as well as some didactic courses. Typhon NPST system is web-based, HIPAA compliant and allows students to quickly and easily document: 1) clinical time logs, 2) patient encounter information such as demographics, clinical information, diagnosis and procedure codes, medications, and brief clinical notes, and 3) achievement of program competencies (https://www.typhongroup.net/np).

The necessary clinical and patient information should be entered into the Typhon Log within seven (7) days following each clinical day. Typhon is set to lock students out from entering any information after the seven (7) day period. Faculty will monitor the Typhon logs regularly to ensure that students are completing their clinical hours and have appropriate clinical experiences. Late entries will not be accepted (https://www.typhongroup.net/np).

DNP students are required to complete 540 faculty/preceptor supervised clinical hours in their program of study. The DNP program provides a wide variety of experiences aimed at achieving the essential and special competencies upon completion of the program. Experiences include (not limited to) in-depth work with experts from nursing as well as other disciplines, providing opportunities for meaningful student engagement within practice environments.

At the end of each semester, students must provide a summary of their clinical time to the course faculty member.

Unicheck Plagiarism Detection

The University of Mobile’s School of Nursing highly values academic integrity and is committed to the fundamental value and obligation of preserving academic honesty among our students. The University of Mobile uses Unicheck software as a formative process to help students develop and improve scholarly writing skills, while promoting academic honesty. This product is used to identify plagiarism and to help students write academic papers more skillfully (http://www.unicheck.com).

In addition to determining the percentage of “originality” and “similarity” in the submitted paper, the software also has other important features such as spell checker, grammar checker, online editing, and automatic tips for proper citation (http://www.unicheck.com).

Appropriate references for the use of Unicheck Plagiarism Detection will appear in the course syllabus.

University Rules and Regulations for Conduct

The Graduate Student Handbook explains the rules and regulations of The University, defines standards of personal and academic conduct expected of students, describes disciplinary procedures and actions, and explains how students may have grievances heard and remedied.

Section IV: Academic Policies and Procedures

Academic Integrity Policy

The University of Mobile has established a policy for students regarding academic integrity. The School of Nursing adheres to this policy as it relates to academic dishonesty by graduate nursing students.

Graduate students attending The University of Mobile are expected to reflect a high standard of academic integrity and conduct themselves in alignment with basic Christian principles and the mission of The University. Any student found to be disruptive in class, copying, plagiarizing (with or without an intent to deceive), cheating, engaging in unauthorized use of a test, forging or falsifying records (self or patient; university, or clinical agency), or lying to a faculty member in order to complete a course assignment will be subject to disciplinary action.

The following are violations of Academic Integrity Policy.

  1. Cheating:
    • Unauthorized use of any materials, notes, sources of information, study aids or tools during an academic exercise. No hats, cell phones, calculators, computers, or other electronic devices allowed during exams.
    •  Unauthorized assistance of a person, other than the course faculty during an academic exercise.
    • Unauthorized viewing of another person’s work during an academic exercise.
    • Unauthorized securing of all or any part of assignments or examinations in advance of the submission by the faculty.
  2. Fabrication/Falsification: 
    The unauthorized invention or alteration of any information, citation, data or means of verification in an academic exercise, official correspondence of a university record, client record, or other professional documentation.
    • Failure to report errors in the clinical area.
    • Falsifying patient/client records by charting incorrect data or removing data.
    • Releasing confidential information about patients/clients to persons who do not have the right to such information.
    • Rude, abusive, or unprofessional language to patients/clients, agency personnel, faculty.
    • Jeopardizing a patient’s/client’s safety.
    • Falsifying clinical time logs or case studies.
  3. Plagiarism: 
    Submitting as one’s own work or creating any material or an idea wholly or in part created by another. This includes, but is not limited to:
    • Oral, written and graphical material.
    • Both published and unpublished work.
    • Any material(s) downloaded from the internet.
  4. Complicity: 
    Helping or attempting to assist someone to commit an act of academic dishonesty.
    • Conveying test information to other students.
    • Reproducing information in duplicate for course assignments.
  5. Unprofessional behavior (verbal or written, virtual or live):
    • Disrespectful to faculty, staff, or peers.
    • Use of inappropriate language.
    • Lack of accountability or responsibility for actions.
    • Disregarding the well-being and needs of patients: acts of commission or omission that could adversely affect the patient, e.g., medication errors, failure to provide safe and appropriate care, failure to follow preceptor/faculty instructions, breach of client confidentiality.
    • Discriminatory or culturally insensitive behavior.
  6. Academic Performance: 
    Any reason that may place the student at risk for dismissal such as:
    • Insufficient or lack of academic skills to support successful completion of graduate program of study.
    • Inconsistent or minimal participation in coursework.
    •  Poor writing or verbal communication skills.
    • Frequent requests for exceptions or special accommodations not related to a documented disability.

Each faculty member has the responsibility of defining academic expectations at the beginning of each session. If a faculty member discovers a student violating the academic integrity code, they must either 1) assign a grade of “0” for the test or assignment if the infraction relates to an academic assignment; and/or 2) refer the incident to the Graduate Faculty Committee. After committee members complete the investigation, the incident, along with supporting evidence, is to be reported in writing to the Vice-President for Academic Affairs with a copy mailed to the student.

The office of the Vice-President for Academic Affairs determines whether the incident is the student’s second offense and, if so, refers the matter to the Academic Affairs Committee for disciplinary action. A student found guilty of a second offense is subject to academic suspension for up to one academic year. A third offense will result in academic dismissal. The student is entitled to appeal any case involving allegations of academic dishonesty or misconduct, in keeping with the appeal process as outlined.

Falsification of medical records may have legal consequences for which the student may be held accountable.

Academic Misconduct

Academic integrity is a responsibility of each student attending The University of Mobile. Plagiarism, cheating, falsifying records (self or patient, university, or clinical agency), lying and any other of academic dishonesty are intolerable. The Graduate Faculty Committee will discipline any student, participating in any form of academic dishonesty, after a thorough review.

Academic Probation

Within the School of Nursing, students must fulfill the requirements for theoretical/didactic and clinical course components of the graduate curriculum, demonstrate academic integrity and ethical conduct, and maintain a level of health which contributes to their meeting course objectives. The faculty in the School of Nursing will impose academic probation or dismiss students from the graduate nursing programs as deemed appropriate. These decisions are guided by academic policies and procedures and specific requirements of each program. Progression occurs when a student successfully completes all courses and clinical requirements taken in the academic semester. Academic probation may be imposed to monitor and support the student’s progression through the graduate program of study.

Students enrolled in a graduate nursing program at The University of Mobile are required to maintain a cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 3.0 in all courses taken toward the degree. Students must have a GPA of 3.0 or higher in order to graduate from any graduate nursing program. Students not meeting the minimum academic standard will be placed on academic probation. Students earning a grade of a C or less on any exam will be referred to the student success center. Students earning a grade of a C or less on any writing assignment will be referred to the writing center.

Graduate nursing students who earn one “C” grade in a non-clinical or non-foundational course will be placed on academic probation; any student that earns a “C” or withdraws from a clinical or foundational course must retake the course and successfully pass the course with a grade of B or higher, including any clinical hours associated with that course, before progressing in the program. Any student who earns two “C” grades in any graduate nursing courses OR earns a grade of “C” and withdraws from a subsequent course with a grade of “C” or less, will be dismissed from their program

Clinical courses include:
NU 551 Family Nurse Practitioner I, NU 652 Family Nurse Practitioner II, NU 653 Family Nurse Practitioner III, or NU 613 Specialty Focus Practicum

Foundational Courses include:
NU 507 Advanced Health Assessment & Diagnostic Reasoning, NU 508 Advanced Pathophysiology, NU 509 Advanced Pharmacology

Students earning a second grade of “C” in a concurrent or subsequent graduate nursing course will be academically dismissed and will be ineligible to apply for readmission to any graduate program in nursing at the University of Mobile.

Students withdrawing from 2 or more courses will be academically dismissed and will be ineligible to apply for readmission to any graduate program in nursing at the University of Mobile.

Students earning a grade of a “D” or “F” or “Unsatisfactory” in any graduate nursing course will receive an academic dismissal and will be ineligible to apply for readmission to any graduate program in nursing at the University of Mobile.

For courses that require completion of clinical hours, the clinical portion of the course will be graded as Pass/Fail. Passage of the clinical portion will ultimately be determined by the course coordinator, in collaboration with the student’s clinical preceptor(s) and clinical instructor for the semester.

Family Nurse Practitioner students must achieve a 75% or greater on the Preceptor Evaluation of Student and the Faculty Final Evaluation of Student in order to Pass. Additionally, any student who attends clinical without prior approval to do so is subject to receiving an automatic Fail for the Clinical Rotation.

All clinical courses require that the student pass BOTH the didactic and clinical portions simultaneously in order to pass the course. See the Graduate Handbook for didactic grading policies. Students who fail either the didactic or clinical rotation will be required to complete the course in its entirety, both the didactic and clinical components.

The student does have the right to appeal academic probation or program dismissal to the Dean/Chair of the School of Nursing. A Dean/Chair’s decision on whether or not appropriate action was taken is final. For instructions on filing an appeal refer to the grievance section of this document.

Adding, Dropping, or Withdrawing from Classes

During specified periods each semester, students may add, drop or withdraw from a course (see the Academic Calendar page from the Registrar’s Office). Students must consult with the academic advisor prior to adding, dropping, or withdrawing from a course.

If a student chooses to drop a course after the last official day to drop a course, a grade of “F” will be recorded on the student’s transcript.

Students who withdraw from a FNP clinical or foundational course (NU 507 Advanced Health Assessment & Diagnostic Reasoning, NU 508 Advanced Pathophysiology, NU 509 Advanced Pharmacology NU 551 Family Nurse Practitioner I, NU 652 Family Nurse Practitioner II, NU 653 Family Nurse Practitioner III, or NU 613 Specialty Focus Practicum) will not be allowed to matriculate in the program and will be unable to apply completed clinical hours to the total required clinical hours for graduation from the FNP program. Students must repeat the entire clinical course regardless of the juncture of withdrawal or the reason for the withdrawal.

Admission Paths

  • Regular Admission
    Admission is granted to students who have completed all requirements of the application process and who have demonstrated an acceptable level of academic achievement in their undergraduate degree program, including meeting program specific minimum GPA requirements and demonstrating preparedness for work at the graduate level in their field of specialization.
  • Early Assurance Admission
    Academically excellent undergraduate students may be eligible for the Graduate Program Early Assurance Admission, an accelerated pathway to graduate degrees. This program permits students in The University of Mobile’s BSN program to apply for admission to graduate programs and have their place reserved in the highly competitive programs. Inclusion in this program is contingent upon maintaining a GPA of 3.0, successful completion of NCLEX, and evidence of leadership and professional behavior throughout the BSN program.
  • Conditional Admission
    A conditional admission will be accompanied with specific details and requirements when sent to the student. A student may receive a conditional admission based on GPA, completion of a BSN degree, obtaining a valid RN license, or other reasons set forth by the admissions committee.

Admission Standards and Requirements

Applicants to the graduate programs must first complete a program-specific application through NursingCAS.  Once accepted, students will be guided through the University of Mobile Graduate Application process to complete enrollment. Admission to the School of Nursing is competitive and will be based on evaluation of the applicant’s overall academic qualifications.

The University of Mobile and the School of Nursing accept students on the basis of academic qualifications, character, personal interview, and evidence of the potential to benefit from The University experience. The University accepts all qualified applicants without regard to race, religion, place of national origin, sex, age, or ethnic group.

Admission requirements for the master’s program in Executive Leadership (BSN to MSN) Program:

  • Submission of application.
  • Submission of official transcripts of all college coursework from all institutions attended.
  • International students
    • Students with international transcripts must provide an evaluation from Commission on Graduates of Foreign Nursing Schools (http://www.cgfns.org) for previous nursing coursework.
    • Students with international transcripts must provide evaluation from World Education Services (http://www.wes.org) for previous non-nursing coursework.
    • International students must show proof of English proficiency. Applicants should request that official TOEFL test scores be sent directly to Enrollment Services.
  • Completion of BSN degree from a regionally accredited education institution.
  • Minimum cumulative GPA of 2.5.
  • Must hold and maintain an unencumbered license to practice as a registered nurse.
  • Submission of a clear background check and absence of criminal conviction.
  • Submission of health history and record of required immunizations.
  • A personal interview with the Graduate Admissions Committee of the School of Nursing may be required, if requested.
  • Submission of current personal health insurance coverage.

Admission Requirements for the master’s program in Nursing Education (BSN-MSN) program:

  • Submission of application.
  • Submission of official transcripts of all college coursework from all institutions attended.
  • International students
    • Students with international transcripts must provide an evaluation from Commission on Graduates of Foreign Nursing Schools (http://www.cgfns.org) for previous nursing coursework.
    • Students with international transcripts must provide evaluation from World Education Services (http://www.wes.org) for previous non-nursing coursework.
    • International students must show proof of English proficiency. Applicants should request that official TOEFL test scores be sent directly to Enrollment Services.
  • Completion of BSN degree from a regionally accredited education institution.
  • Minimum cumulative GPA of 2.5.
  • Must hold and maintain an unencumbered license to practice as a registered nurse.
  • Submission of a clear background check and absence of criminal conviction.
  • Submission of Health History and record of required immunizations.
  • A personal interview with the Graduate Admissions Committee of the School of Nursing may be required, if requested.
  • Submission of current personal health insurance coverage.

Admission Requirements for the master’s program in Family Nurse Practitioner (BSN-MSN, BSN-DNP) program:

  • Submission of application. Applications will be accepted until the class is filled.
  • Submission of official transcripts of all college coursework from all institutions attended.
  • International students
    • Students with international transcripts must provide an evaluation from Commission on Graduates of Foreign Nursing Schools (http://www.cgfns.org) for previous nursing coursework.
    • Students with international transcripts must provide evaluation from World Education Services (http://www.wes.org) for previous non-nursing coursework.
    • International students must show proof of English proficiency. Applicants should request that official TOEFL test scores be sent directly to Enrollment Services.
  • Completion of BSN degree in Nursing from a regionally accredited educational institution.
  • Applicants with a non-BSN must have a BS degree and 1 year of RN experience. The BS degree must be approved by the Graduate Committee.
  • Minimum cumulative GPA 3.0 on last 60 hours of academic coursework.
  • Must hold and maintain an unencumbered license to practice as a registered nurse in the state the student will complete FNP clinical experiences.
  • Minimum of one (1) year of clinical experience preferred but not required.
  • Submission of a clear background check and absence of criminal conviction.
  • Submission of health history and record of required immunizations.
  • Submission of record of American Heart Association or American Red Cross BLS Health Care Provider Certification.
  • A personal interview with the Graduate Admissions Committee of the School of Nursing may be required, if requested.
  • Submission of current personal health insurance coverage.
  • Three reference forms from:
    • A current clinical supervisor or nurse manager who has direct knowledge of the applicant’s skills in the clinical setting and how they will translate into the family nurse practitioner role.
    • A professor, faculty member or academic advisor who can provide a meaningful assessment of the applicant’s academic record.
    • A practicing clinical nurse professional, or APRN, who has served as a mentor and can speak to the applicant’s abilities as a nurse and potential to become a family nurse practitioner.
  • Current Curriculum Vita or Resume is required. The document should include:
    • Educational background including institutions, degree(s) awarded, degree(s) in progress, dates of degree(s) awarded and/or anticipated date of receiving degree(s).
    • Relevant employment history, including:
      • Job title, job description, and relevant duties performed.
      • Employment dates of each position.
    • Community service or volunteer experience.
    • Any awards, publications, presentations, memberships, or honors.
    • Evidence of leadership and career progression.
  • Personal statement of no more than two pages discussing:
    • How your previous education, experience and professional interests have prepared you to be successful in the Family Nurse Practitioner Program.
    • Your professional goals and how completing the family nurse practitioner program will help you achieve your professional goals.
    • Your understanding of the family nurse practitioner role and your intentions regarding service in primary care practice.
    • Steps you have you taken to prepare you for success in this program.
    • Your essay should be clear, succinct, and double-spaced.

Required Pre-requisites

  • Elementary Statistics

Admission Requirements for the Post-Master’s Certificate in Family Nurse Practitioner program:

  • Submission of application. Applications will be accepted until the class is filled.
  • Submission of official transcripts of all college coursework from all institutions attended.
  • International students
    • Students with international transcripts must provide an evaluation from Commission on Graduates of Foreign Nursing Schools (http://www.cgfns.org) for previous nursing coursework.
    • Students with international transcripts must provide evaluation from World Education Services (http://www.wes.org) for previous non-nursing coursework.
    • International students must show proof of English proficiency. Applicants should request that official TOEFL test scores be sent directly to Enrollment Services.
  • Completion of MSN degree from a regionally accredited educational institution.
  • Minimum cumulative GPA 3.0 on last 60 hours of academic coursework.
  • Must hold and maintain an unencumbered license to practice as a registered nurse in the state the student will complete FNP clinical experiences.
  • Minimum of one (1) year of clinical experience preferred but not required.
  • Submission of a clear background check and absence of criminal conviction.
  • Submission of health history and record of required immunizations.
  • Submission of record of American Heart Association BLS or American Red Cross Health Care Provider Certification.
  • A personal interview with the Graduate Admissions Committee of the School of Nursing may be required, if requested.
  • Submission of current personal health insurance coverage.
  • Three reference forms from:
    • A current clinical supervisor or nurse manager who has direct knowledge of the applicant’s skills in the clinical setting and how they will translate into the family nurse practitioner role.
    • A professor, faculty member or academic advisor who can provide a meaningful assessment of the applicant’s academic record. 
    • A practicing clinical nurse professional, or APRN, who has served as a mentor and can speak to the applicant’s abilities as a nurse and potential to become a family nurse practitioner.
  • Current Curriculum Vita or Resume is required. The document should include:
    • Educational background including institutions, degree(s) awarded, degree(s) in progress, dates of degree(s) awarded and/or anticipated date of receiving degree(s).
    • Relevant employment history, including:
      • Job title, job description, and relevant duties performed.
      • Employment dates of each position.
    • Community service or volunteer experience.
    • Any awards, publications, presentations, memberships, or honors.
    • Evidence of leadership and career progression.
  • Personal statement of no more than two pages discussing:
    • How your previous education, experience and professional interests have prepared you to be successful in the Family Nurse Practitioner Program.
    • Your professional goals and how completing the family nurse practitioner program will help you achieve your professional goals.
    • Your understanding of the family nurse practitioner role and your intentions regarding service in primary care practice.
    • Steps you have you taken to prepare you for success in this program.
    • Your essay should be clear, succinct, and double-spaced.

Required Pre-requisites

  • Elementary Statistics

Admission requirements for the Doctor of Nursing Practice (Post-Master’s DNP) program:

  • Submission of application. 
  • Submission of official transcripts of all college coursework from all institutions attended.
  • International students:
    • Students with international transcripts must provide an evaluation from Commission on Graduates of Foreign Nursing Schools for previous nursing coursework.
    • Students with international transcripts must provide evaluation from World Education Services (http://www.wes.org/) for previous non-nursing coursework.
    • International students must show proof of English proficiency. Applicants should request that official TOEFL test scores be sent directly to Enrollment Services.
  • Completion of BSN or MSN degree from a regionally accredited educational institution.
  • GPA of 3.0 based on the last 60 academic hours
  • Must hold and maintain an unencumbered license to practice as a registered nurse in a state or territory of the United States in which the student will complete clinical experiences.
  • Minimum of one (1) year of clinical experience preferred but not required.
  • Submission of a clear background check and absence of criminal conviction.
  • Submission of health history and record of required immunizations.
  • Submission of record of American Heart Association BLS or American Red Cross Healthcare Provider Certification.
  • A personal interview with the Graduate Admissions Committee of the School of Nursing may be required, if requested.
  • Submission of current personal health insurance coverage.
  • Three reference forms from:
    • A current clinical supervisor or nurse manager who has direct knowledge of the applicant’s skills in the clinical setting and how they will translate into the Doctor of Nursing Practice role.
    • A professor, faculty member or academic advisor who can provide a meaningful assessment of the applicant’s academic record.
    • A practicing clinical nursing professional who has served as a mentor and can speak about the applicant’s abilities as a nurse and potential to become a Doctor of Nursing Practice.
  • Current Curriculum Vita or Resume is required. The Curriculum Vita or Resume should include:
    • Educational background including institutions, degree(s) awarded, degree(s) in progress, dates of degree(s) awarded and/or anticipated date of receiving degree(s).
    • Relevant employment history, including:
      • Job title, job description, and relevant duties performed.
      • Employment dates of each position.
    • Community service or volunteer experience.
    • Any awards, publications, presentations, memberships, or honors.
    • Evidence of leadership and career progression.
  • Personal statement of no more than two pages discussing:
    • How your previous education, experience and professional interests have prepared you to be successful in the Doctor of Nursing Practice program.
    • Your professional goals and how completing the Doctor of Nursing Practice program will help you achieve your professional goals.
    • Your understanding of the Doctor of Nursing Practice role and your intentions regarding service as a Doctor of Nursing Practice professional.
    • Steps you have you taken to prepare you for success in this program.
    • Your essay should be clear, succinct, and double-spaced.

Advising Responsibilities

Advising is an integral part of the student experience at The University of Mobile. It is a collaborative process in which students are expected to assume primary responsibility for their academic planning while faculty advisors provide expertise and support in the process.

A student accepted into one of the graduate nursing programs will be assigned a faculty advisor. Upon enrollment, each student is assigned a faculty advisor to assist the student with academic concerns, planning the program of study, and assuring that graduation requirements are met. Prior to the first semester of graduate study, the student will make a plan of study with their advisor. Education is ultimately the responsibility of the learner, but the advisor’s input to the student’s plan of study and semester schedule enhances student awareness of how each course contributes to overall progress towards graduation.

Responsibilities of the faculty advisor include:

  • Develop an individualized plan of study with the student to meet the student’s academic professional goals based on current curricular guidelines.
  • Communicate with the student to facilitate registration (e.g., discuss changes in courses, overall program, approve course selections).
  • Keep informed of student progress through:
    1. Communicating with the student.
    2. Communicating and discussing progress with other faculty members.
    3. Monitoring grades and academic standing each semester.
    4. Referring the student to the appropriate campus resources if requested.
    5. Communicating with the Dean and/or the Academic Vice-President for course waivers, transfer credits, and course substitutions.

Responsibilities of the student advisee:

  • Clarify with the faculty advisor their preferred method of contact (email or telephone), virtual or office hours, and when to expect a response to email or voice mail.
  • Communicate with the faculty advisor any concerns regarding course registration.
  • Contact the faculty advisor if they wish to change the sequence of their plan of study.
  • Communicate with the faculty advisor in case of academic difficulty, interruption in program, or potential change in academic status.
  • Contact the faculty advisor if their cumulative GPA for the semester is less than 3.0.
  • Contact the faculty advisor for questions about campus resources to assist them with their academic work.
  • Maintain regular contact with the faculty advisor via email, telephone, or face-to-face meetings.

When a student is recommended for dismissal from a graduate nursing program, the Graduate Program Chair will provide a written notification of dismissal. Students will be recommended for dismissal from the graduate nursing program under the following conditions:

  • Earning a grade less than a “B” in two different nursing courses, earning a grade of less than a B in one clinical or foundational course, or in one repeated nursing course.
  • Withdrawing from more than two nursing courses.
  • Exhibiting conduct that is unprofessional, incompetent, unethical, or illegal in the classroom or clinical settings as outlined by the American Nurses’ Association Code for Nurses and/or School of Nursing clinical policies.
  • Cheating on course examinations, plagiarism or improper documentation or falsification of clinical records, time logs, or activities.
  • The School of Nursing retains the right to permanently dismiss from the program any student who is deemed to violate the policies and procedures of the School of Nursing; policies and procedures of clinical and affiliating facilities; professional behavior; and/or policies of confidentiality.

Evaluation of Nursing Programs

The faculty believes that a systematic ongoing evaluation is essential to the development of an educationally sound academic program. Methodical evaluation promotes the search for effective, efficient, and innovative approaches to learning and results in the continuing improvement of the educational program. It provides a basis for making decisions regarding program modifications and changes, resulting in the continuing improvement of the education program. The purposes of program evaluation are to:

  1. Determine to what extent students are prepared to meet the objectives of the professional program.
  2. Promote continuous improvement in the overall program.
  3. Encourage personal/professional growth and responsibility of faculty and students through participation in the evaluation of the educational program.

Graduate students participate in the evaluation process by providing electronic evaluations of all nursing courses. Additionally, graduate students are provided opportunities to share information through student representatives with the Graduate Faculty Committee and through other informal channels of communication. Students are also asked to complete an end-of-program evaluation at the time of graduation.

Grading

Grades are earned through completion of course requirements. Points are awarded based on the level of achievement of expected outcomes. Earned points for each learning activity (examination, written assignment, presentation, etc.) are posted on the Canvas Gradebook within the course. Students are responsible for tracking their own progress. Questions or concerns regarding grades earned should be addressed to the course faculty within one week of the grade posting. No grades will be reviewed after the grades have been posted for one (1) week.

There is no rounding of test/exam grades in the nursing program. All grades will be recorded to the one hundredth (e.g. 81.27). Upon course conclusion, grades will be averaged as specified in the course syllabus with the final grade determined to the nearest one hundredth (79.99 would not be considered a passing grade). Extra credit opportunities are not available at the graduate level.

Course grades are earned by the student based on an accumulation of total possible points in a course. This is individualized based upon the instructor’s plan for the course. Some assignments may be recorded as a percentage of the total grade. If there are questions or concerns, the student should refer to the course syllabus and consult the course faculty member.

The instructor makes the final decision on a test/exam grade. If the student believes a course grade is unfair, this may be discussed with the instructor, the Graduate Program Chair, and the Dean. The student appeal process should be followed in the appropriate sequence and is outlined in the School of Nursing Graduate Student Handbook.

For courses that require completion of clinical hours, the clinical portion of the course will be graded as Pass/Fail. Passage of the clinical portion will ultimately be determined by the course coordinator, in collaboration with the student’s clinical preceptor(s) and clinical instructor for the semester.

Family Nurse Practitioner students must achieve a 75% or greater on the Preceptor Evaluation of Student and the Faculty Final Evaluation of Student in order to Pass. Additionally, any student who attends clinical without prior approval to do so is subject to receiving an automatic Fail for the Clinical Rotation.

All clinical courses require that the student pass BOTH the didactic and clinical portions simultaneously in order to pass the course. See the Graduate Handbook for didactic grading policies. Students who fail either the didactic or clinical rotation will be required to complete the course in its entirety, both the didactic and clinical components.

Exam Review Policy

Students will not be permitted to review examination questions or answers.  After examinations are completed and grades have been posted, exam content areas may be reviewed with students at the discretion of the faculty. Final examinations are NOT reviewed in any capacity.

Grading Scale

Final grades are computed according to the following standard based on a total of 100%.

A 90-100
B 80-89
C 70-79
D 60-69
F <60

The Grade Point Average (GPA) is calculated by the registrar’s office:

A 4 Points
B 3 Points
C 2 Points
D 1 Point
F 0  Points

Grievance Policy and Process

The School of Nursing follows a Grievance Procedure for the resolution of formal student complaints or concerns. Formal complaints must be made in writing to the Graduate Chair. The formal complaint must include specific information, including the nature of the complaint and evidence supporting the complaint. An investigation is initiated within seven (7) days of receipt. In cases of alleged arbitrary, inconsistent, or discriminatory grading, the following review process will be followed in the School of Nursing:

  1. In on-campus courses, the student will request a meeting within (1) week with the course faculty to review the basis for the grade. In online courses, the student will request an online or telephone conference with the faculty to review the basis for the grade.
  2. If the student is not satisfied with the meeting or conference with the course faculty, the student may appeal to the Graduate Chair within 14 days after the course faculty decision. The Graduate Chair will seek to mediate the issue between the student and the course faculty.
  3. If the student is unsatisfied with the findings and recommendations by the Graduate Chair, the student may appeal to the Dean of the School of Nursing within 14 days of the Graduate Chair’s decision. The Dean will meet with the student, confer with the course faculty member, and then make the final decision. The student should be notified of the decision within fourteen (14) days of submission of their formal complaint.

Incomplete Grade Policy

A written request for a grade of incomplete (“I”) is initiated by a student when students are unable to complete the work for a course due to reasons beyond their control (hospitalization, serious physical and mental health issues, death of spouse/child/parents), etc.). The grade of “I” is only given in cases where the incomplete is unavoidable and legitimate. Students may be required to provide formal documentation to support an incomplete grade request. Students may not request an incomplete due to failing course grades or poor course performance.

An Incomplete Grade Form that includes the reason for the incomplete, the work that must be completed to earn a final course grade and the required completion date is generated when an “I” is submitted as a course grade. The completion date must be no later than the last day of the next scheduled academic term. The “I” is a temporary grade and will be automatically converted to an “F” if the course has not been completed by the end of the next scheduled academic term. Extensions beyond one scheduled term are not allowed for graduate courses. Students who seek an incomplete grade will not be permitted to continue in their curriculum sequence until the incomplete grade is converted to a numerical grade.

Limitation in Completion of Requirements

Graduate students in the MSN Nursing Education or MSN Executive Leadership track must complete all degree requirements within six (6) years of beginning the program. Graduate students in the Family Nurse Practitioner track must complete all degree requirements within a four (4) year period, FNP students must complete the program within 2 years of successfully passing the three P courses NU 507, NU 508, and NU 509. Graduate students in the Post-Masters Certificate FNP track must complete all degree requirements within four (4) years. Time limits shall be computed from and include the first semester of credit applied to the degree program. Students who do not enroll for two (2) consecutive semesters are subject to all program requirements, policies, and guidelines in place at the time of re-enrollment and must re-apply to the program.

On-Campus Intensives for Family Nurse Practitioner Program

There will be 1 on-campus orientation and 2 on-campus intensives throughout the program to provide hands-on learning experiences with opportunities to meet faculty and become acquainted with cohort classmates while engaging in learning activities and completing competency requirements. Intensives extend over a period of 2-3 full days.

Attendance is mandatory for on-campus orientation and all on-campus intensives. Failure to attend orientation or an intensive and satisfactorily complete all required activities during the intensives will result in the delay of program progression, academic probation, or dismissal from the program.

All FNP students are emailed information and an agenda well in advance of each session. Students are responsible for their own lodging and transportation arrangements. There are no housing facilities available on campus. A list of hotel recommendations may be requested.

All University facilities are available to students during the intensives. The computer lab is open and free for student use. Wireless access is also available throughout the School of Nursing building.

Progression

Within the School of Nursing, students must fulfill the requirements for theoretical/didactic and clinical course components of the graduate curriculum, demonstrate academic integrity and ethical conduct, and maintain a level of health which contributes to their meeting course objectives. The faculty in the School of Nursing will impose academic probation or dismiss students from the graduate nursing programs as deemed appropriate. These decisions are guided by academic policies and procedures and specific requirements of each program. Progression occurs when a student successfully completes all courses and clinical requirements taken in the academic semester. Academic probation may be imposed to monitor and support the student’s progression through the graduate program of study.

Students enrolled in a graduate nursing program at The University of Mobile are required to maintain a cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 3.0 in all courses taken toward the degree. Students must have a GPA of 3.0 or higher in order to graduate from any graduate nursing program. Students not meeting the minimum academic standard will be placed on academic probation. Students earning a grade of a C or less on any exam will be referred to the student success center. Students earning a grade of a C or less on any writing assignment will be referred to the writing center.

Graduate nursing students who earn one “C” grade in a non-clinical or non-foundational course will be placed on academic probation; any student that earns a “C” or withdraws from a clinical or foundational course must retake the course and successfully pass the course with a grade of B or higher, including any clinical hours associated with that course, before progressing in the program. Any student who earns two “C” grades in any graduate nursing courses OR earns a grade of “C” and withdraws from a subsequent course with a grade of “C” or less, will be dismissed from their program.

Clinical courses include:
NU 551 Family Nurse Practitioner I, NU 652 Family Nurse Practitioner II, NU 653 Family Nurse Practitioner III, or NU 613 Specialty Focus Practicum

Foundational Courses include:
NU 507 Advanced Health Assessment & Diagnostic Reasoning, NU 508 Advanced Pathophysiology, NU 509 Advanced Pharmacology

Students earning a second grade of “C” in a concurrent or subsequent graduate nursing course OR withdrawing from a concurrent or subsequent graduate course wit ha grade of “C” or less, will be academically dismissed and will be ineligible to apply for readmission to any graduate program in nursing at The University of Mobile.

Students earning a grade of a “D” or “F” or “Unsatisfactory” in any graduate nursing course will receive an academic dismissal and will be ineligible to apply for readmission to any graduate program in nursing at The University of Mobile.

Students withdrawing from 2 or more courses will be academically dismissed and will be ineligible to apply for readmission to any graduate program in nursing at the University of Mobile.

For courses that require completion of clinical hours, the clinical portion of the course will be graded as Pass/Fail. Passage of the clinical portion will ultimately be determined by the course coordinator, in collaboration with the student’s clinical preceptor(s) and clinical instructor for the semester.

In the Family Nurse Practitioner program, the student must achieve a 75% or greater on the Preceptor Evaluation of Student and the Faculty Final Evaluation of Student in order to Pass. Additionally, any student who attends clinical without prior approval to do so is subject to receiving an automatic Fail for the Clinical Rotation.

All clinical courses require that the student pass BOTH the didactic and clinical portions simultaneously in order to pass the course. See the Graduate Handbook for didactic grading policies. Students who fail either the didactic or clinical rotation will be required to complete the course in its entirety, both the didactic and clinical components.

DNP students must complete a manuscript and present their project at the DNP Poster Presentation on campus in their final semester in order to complete graduation requirements for the program. Project courses NU 809 and NU 812 are designed to allow the student to work on specific aspects of their project. Students must complete the requirements and assignments in NU 809 including, but not limited to, IRB approval. Students must complete all of the requirements and assignments in NU 812 in order to graduate the program. Students may take additional hours of NU 809 and NU 812 in order to complete each section of their project. NU 809 and NU 812 may be repeated up to 2 additional semesters each with a maximum of 4 credit hours. Students who fail to complete requirements of NU 809 or NU 812 after their third attempt will be dismissed from the program.

 

Full-Time to Part-Time Transition

Students admitted into the full-time MSN FNP program or full-time BSN-DNP track may choose to transition to the part-time track of the MSN FNP or BSN-DNP programs respectively, if they the following conditions:

  • Must elect to change before the W drop date of the first fall semester.
  • In order to continue into the subsequent spring semester, the student must pass at least 2 courses in the first fall semester with one of those courses being either NU 507 Physical Assessment or NU 509 Advanced Pharmacology.
  • If students elect to drop all courses and wish to transition to the part-time program, they must resubmit an application for their program for the following year.

Federal Financial Aid requires a minimum of 6 credit hours per semester in order to qualify to receive Federal aid.  Students must be aware in transitioning from the full-time program to the part-time program, there is a possibility they may not qualify for financial based on hour requirements.  It is the student’s responsibility to communicate with their advisor before dropping courses.

Readmission after Dismissal/Appeal

Students who have earned more than two (2) C’s or have withdrawn from 2 or more courses will not be considered for readmission. Dismissals due to academic misconduct or grades of “D” or “F” are not eligible to appeal for readmission. Students withdrawing from 2 or more graduate nursing courses, exhibiting unprofessional or illegal behaviors in the classroom or clinical setting, and/or violating academic integrity policy will not be eligible for re-enrollment or readmission.

Readmission After Voluntary Withdrawal or Transfer

A student who leaves the University and/or School of Nursing in good standing through voluntary withdrawal or a student from another graduate nursing program who left in good standing and desires to transfer to the University of Mobile graduate nursing program may be evaluated for readmission under the following circumstances:

  1. Complete an application for readmission to the School of Nursing.
  2. At the time of application for readmission, submit a statement, which addresses the reason for the withdrawal or transfer, outlines what will be done by the student to ensure success in the School of Nursing, and discusses why the student should be given consideration for re-admission. The statement must be written by the student.
  3. The student will be required to have a personal interview with the Graduate Admission’s Committee and Dean. The student’s complete academic record, including all clinical evaluations will be reviewed.
  4. Readmission is not automatic or guaranteed. Students will be considered as part of the total applicant pool.
  5. The requirements for completion of program/major requirements beginning at initial enrollment will be in effect for readmitted students.

Students who have not been enrolled for a time period longer than two (2) consecutive semesters must reapply for admission. Student petitions for reactivation will be considered only one time during their program. Students approved for readmission may be placed on probationary status at the discretion of the Graduate Program Chair and the Graduate Faculty Committee.

Registering for Classes

Newly admitted or re-enrolling (those who are not currently enrolled) graduate students should enroll in courses during designated registration periods. Students are responsible for contacting their faculty advisor each semester to register and enroll in courses according to their program of study. The dates for registration are widely publicized.

  • Upon acceptance to the School of Nursing, students need to consult with the academic advisor to develop a program plan specific to their degree program and area of study.
  • Students must have an approved program plan on file in the School of Nursing. The student’s academic advisor must approve any change in the program plan. 
  • Any change in the program plan may result in the course(s) being unavailable and may delay graduation.
  • All graduate students must register on the computer through Self-Service.

The graduate curricula are subject to change based upon professional or accreditation standards and/or national certification requirements. Students will be notified when
changes occur.

DNP Scholarly Project Overview

Detailed instructions and requirements for the DNP project are provided in the DNP Guidelines. A copy of the guidelines is available to review and download in all DNP courses in the file section of the course within Canvas. Additionally, a copy will be provided to each DNP student at orientation. Students are required to review the entire document and follow the guidelines for their DNP project.

The DNP Project courses are the integrating courses that bring together the practice and scholarship elements of the Doctor of Nursing Practice degree. The DNP Project is a 4-5 semester scholarly project designed to address a practice issue affecting groups of patients, health care organizations, health care systems or professional organizations. Students work with clinics, inpatient units, hospitals, health care systems, or professional organizations to assess, plan, implement, and evaluate an initiative jointly agreed upon by the setting, the student, and the student’s advisory faculty.

Advisory Committee

Each student will be assigned a faculty chair to oversee their project. The faculty chair will guide the student on each section of the project. The faculty chair must approve each section before it is submitted to the committee for approval. The DNP Project is directed by a Graduate Committee; chaired by a doctorally prepared regular member of the School of Nursing faculty. The committee is composed of a chairperson and two others, one of whom must be doctorally prepared. Whenever possible, the three members of the committee should possess complementary areas of expertise to guide the content and methods of the scholarly project.

Sites for the DNP Scholarly Project

Students may propose to use their current site of employment or another site for the DNP scholarly project. Once a potential site is identified and approved by the student’s advisory committee, the student will have the clinical site sign a letter of agreement. Thus, students in the first semester of the program are encouraged to identify and propose a potential site as affiliations could take up to six months to complete. The advisory committee maintains the right to decline a proposed scholarly project site based on population size, feasibility of project completion, or other reasons that may negatively impact the student or University.

DNP Scholarly Project Progress and Associated Academic Credit

The DNP project is a minimum of 12 credits over 3 semesters. The project requires a minimum of 540 hours; typically, students spend over 600 hours on their project. The student is required to keep track of the project hours utilizing Typhon clinical hours tracking software. Hours must be completed and documented in Typhon prior to graduation.

NU 703 requires that the student develop a DNP Project Proposal.  Students who are unable to complete the requirements of NU 703 to develop a viable project and written proposal will not be permitted to register for NU 809.  Refer to the DNP Guidelines document for additional details on the project proposal.

Students taking NU 809 who do not receive University and Project Site IRB approval before November 1 each fall or April 1 each spring, will not be allowed to progress to NU 812. Students must take additional hours of NU 809 until IRB approval is obtained, up to a maximum of 3 total attempts. If the student is unable to achieve IRB approval from both the University of Mobile and the proposed project site (if required by the institution) after 3 attempts to complete NU 809, then the student will be dismissed from the program. Students in NU 812 who are unable to complete their project before graduation must take additional hours of NU 812 in subsequent semesters, up to a total of 3 attempts, until the project is complete.  If the student is unable to complete the project after taking NU 812 3 times, then the student will be dismissed from the program. Students are required to complete a manuscript and professionally present their project through a poster presentation.  See DNP Guidelines for additional details on requirements.

STUDENTS ARE NOT ALLOWED TO TAKE NU 809 IN THE SUMMER SEMESTER AS THE IRB COMMITTEE DOES NOT MEET DURING THE SUMMER.

Section V: Clinical Policies and Procedures

Administrative Drop Policy for Failure to Submit Clinical Practice Requirements

It is imperative that all graduate students are in compliance with clinical practice requirements for Code of Conduct, immunizations, RN licensure, CPR certification, criminal background check and drug screen. Students enrolled in a course that contains a clinical component are required to ensure all requirements are submitted and are up to date. Students who fail to submit or update evidence of compliance with required items within the first week of the semester will not be allowed to attend clinical and may be administratively dropped from the clinical course for which they are registered.

The course instructor or Graduate Program Chair may initiate the administrative drop process if a student does not upload all required documents into Magnus.

The process for administratively dropping a student for failure to submit evidence of the above requirements will be as follows:

  1. The clinical coordinator in the School of Nursing will provide a compliance report to the Graduate Chair the week before the semester term commences. If a student has failed to submit the documents required by the School of Nursing (complete and up to date), the clinical coordinator will contact the student via University email, reminding the student of the submission requirement and notifying the student they are out of compliance. The student will be given seven (7) days to submit the required documents.
  2. If the student fails to respond to the email directive, fails to submit the required documents or fails to notify the clinical coordinator of their intent to rectify the situation, the instructor will notify the Graduate Chair and the Dean of the School of Nursing requesting that the student be administratively dropped from the course and that their access to the course be removed.

Clinical Agency Agreements

The School of Nursing has a legal responsibility to have written agreements with each agency used for clinical practice. The Clinical Agency Agreements are established and maintained through the office of the School of Nursing.

The agreements delineate The University’s responsibility from the clinical agencies when students and faculty are present. The School of Nursing and clinical agencies assume shared responsibilities for the students’ educational experiences in the clinical setting.

Selected portions of the clinical agreement directly related to student responsibility are as follows:

  • The University will instruct all graduate nursing students assigned to the clinical agencies to maintain strict confidentiality of medical records and patient/client data imparted during the educational experience.
  • The University will not allow students to participate in clinical experiences who have not documented their proof of immunization for tetanus, diphtheria, and polio; Hepatitis B series; Tuberculin skin test (chest x-ray if appropriate); QuantiFERON Gold blood test; influenza; proof of immunity to rubella, chickenpox and MMR.
  • If the clinical agency deems a student’s performance to be unsatisfactory and detrimental to its healthcare responsibilities, the clinic may suspend the student from utilizing the clinical agency for clinical experience. The faculty will conduct an investigation and decide appropriate disciplinary action.
  • The nature of this cooperative agreement is such that each party undertakes obligations to the other without passage of funds between The University and the clinical agency or between the personnel of their respective staffs.

Clinical Practice Preparation

Students are responsible for securing their own clinical placements within their geographical region. Clinical experiences are performed within the student’s geographical area based on the requirements of the course. Students who reside in rural areas may have limited options in securing clinical placement and students who live in an area that has numerous graduate nursing programs may have more competition in securing clinical placements.

If the student chooses to use a clinical site with which The University has a Clinical Agency Agreement in place, the student must submit preceptor planning request forms at least 6 weeks prior to the first day of the upcoming semester during which they intend to use the preceptor. If the student chooses to use a clinical site with which The University does not have an existing Clinical Agency Agreement in place, the student must submit preceptor planning request forms at least 12 weeks prior to the first day of the semester during which they intend to use the preceptor. This time is needed to ensure that The University of Mobile School of Nursing can secure a Clinical Agency Agreement with the healthcare institution if one does not currently exist. The process can be time intensive due to each party will have an attorney review and may take several reviews before terms of the agreement are finalized. In the event a student has not secured a preceptor by the course last day to drop a course without financial penalty, students will be withdrawn from the course.

A Clinical Agency Agreement must be signed and on file at The University of Mobile School of Nursing prior to any clinical activity. This agreement must be in place for each clinical site, where hands-on care is provided, no matter how many hours will be completed at the site. Any hours performed before the agreement has been finalized will not count toward your clinical hour requirement. Furthermore, attending a clinical prior to the finalizing of an affiliation agreement will result in disciplinary action.

Additional information about clinical practice preparation and preceptor guidelines can be found in the Clinical Guidelines.

Immunosuppressed Student Policy

NOTICE TO STUDENTS IN CLINICAL NURSING COURSES: Persons who are immunosuppressed are more susceptible to contracting diseases caused by microorganisms. If you know or believe that your own immune system is suppressed, please be reminded that you are endangering your own health by participating in clinical learning experiences that involve direct client care. If you have any concerns about your health status, you are encouraged to seek the advice of your health care provider.

Clinical Attendance and Absence Policy

All students are required to notify their faculty and/or preceptor of their absence from a clinical experience. The student will adhere to the faculty and/or preceptor’s request for notification, contacting them by telephone, email, or text message. In an emergency, faculty and/or preceptors should be notified of the student’s absence at least two (2) hours prior to their scheduled clinical time. Students in the Graduate Nursing Program are expected to exemplify professional behaviors and appropriate notification of their clinical absence is required. Students who fail to notify their faculty and preceptor as stated above will receive a written warning. Repeat violations may result in disciplinary actions, including but not limited to grade penalty, failure of clinical course, and dismissal from the program.

Clinical Course Expectations

The student must be prepared for all clinical learning opportunities. The student must comply with clinical course expectations:

1. Assure that there is a Clinical Agency Agreement in place with the clinical site prior to performing any clinical rotations.
2. Arrive on time to all clinical rotation experiences; being well-rested and prepared.
3. Properly identify yourself to all patients and other health care providers as a University of Mobile School of Nursing family nurse practitioner student.
4. Adhere to the School of Nursing professional dress code and wear a cleaned and pressed lab coat with the school identification badge in clear view.
5. Participate in clinical practice as a family nurse practitioner student only under the supervision and direction of an approved preceptor and/or a University of Mobile faculty member.
6. Actively seek learning experiences guided by the approved preceptor.
7. Perform only approved procedures that are within the scope of practice as a family nurse practitioner and only under the direct supervision of an approved preceptor and/or faculty member.
8. Elicit an appropriate health history and perform a comprehensive physical examination in a professional manner.
9. Identify and respond appropriately to abnormal findings from the history and physical, physical examination, and other diagnostic data.
10. Verify and discuss all findings, suspected diagnoses, recommended treatment, and plans of care with the preceptor prior to implementation.
11. Document findings in a concise, organized, and accurate manner using correct medical terminology and clinical agency or institutional guidelines.
12. Always maintain patient confidentiality.
13. Provide health promotion and disease prevention education to patients across the lifespan in an appropriate manner.
14. Recognize that some problems are outside the family nurse practitioner scope of practice; identify when a client should be referred to a physician, specialist, or other health care facility for management.
15. Collaborate with other health care professionals in coordinating care as needed.
16. Recognize emergency situations and initiate effective emergency care when needed.
17. Communicate effectively with preceptor, faculty, and other members of the healthcare team.
18. Notify your faculty member and preceptor immediately for any problems, issues, or concerns that arise in the clinical area.
19. Demonstrate behavior that is both ethical and professional at all times.
20. Demonstrate safety at all times in clinical practice.
21. Document clinical and patient information into the Typhon Nurse Practitioner Student Tracking System (NPST) within seven days (7) of each clinical day.

Clinical Hour Requirements for MSN Nursing Education and MSN Executive Leadership Courses

The University of Mobile, School of Nursing recognizes that clinical practice requirements are essential to the education of nurses in leadership nursing roles. Specific courses within the Nursing Education and Executive Leadership Programs require students to participate in clinical experiences at an accepted clinical site with an approved preceptor. Courses requiring clinical experiences include NU 531, NU 534, and NU 536 Executive Leadership of Nursing Practicum or NU 541, NU 544, and NU 546 Nursing Education Practicum.

All clinical hours are to be completed during the semester in which the student is enrolled. No clinical hours may be completed after the last day of the course. Students should be prudent and timely in securing clinical sites.

Clinical Hour Requirements for Family Nurse Practitioner Courses

The University of Mobile School of Nursing recognizes that clinical practice requirements are essential to the education of nurses in advanced practice nursing roles. Family nurse practitioner students are required to complete 660 faculty/preceptor supervised clinical hours in their program of study (NU 551 Family Nurse Practitioner I, NU 652 Family Nurse Practitioner II, NU 653 Family Nurse Practitioner III, and NU 613 Specialty Focus Practicum).
These hours are divided into specialties as described in each clinical course syllabus. Clinical hours must be spent with an approved preceptor, at an approved site.

The MSN-FNP courses that include clinical experience opportunities are:
NU 551 Family Nurse Practitioner I (180 hours)
NU 652 Family Nurse Practitioner II (180 hours)
NU 653 Family Nurse Practitioner III (180 hours)
NU 613 Specialty Focus Practicum (120 hours)

Complete details regarding clinical requirements and policies can be located in the University of Mobile SON Clinical Guidelines.

The Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE), supports the requirement of a minimum of 500 supervised direct patient care clinical hours in a FNP program to “address Nurse Practitioner competencies in the preparation of the NP role and population-focused area” (Key Element II-E of the CCNE Standards for Accreditation of Baccalaureate and Graduate Nursing Programs, 2016).

Direct Patient Clinical hours are defined by the National Task Force (NTF), Criterion III.E (2016) as “hours in which direct clinical care is provided to individuals and families in one of the six population-focused areas of NP practice; these hours do not include skill lab hours, physical assessment practice sessions, or a community project if it does not include provision of direct patient care. Clinical experiences and time spent in each experience should be varied and distributed in a way that prepares the student to provide care to the populations served.”

To complete the 180 clinical hours required for NU 551, NU 652, and NU 653 students must plan to spend an average of two (2) days a week at their approved clinical site (approximately 12-15 hours a week). Often, preceptors may take a day off for a vacation, illness, holiday, or for a personal issue. It is important that students plan their schedules accordingly to ensure that they are able to complete the clinical hour requirement with the designated time frame.

Indirect clinical time (e.g., on-campus activities or participation in intensives) and simulation hours are not counted in the total number of hours required for advanced practice certification. Clinical hours must involve direct contact with patients/clients. According to the National Task Force on Quality Nurse Practitioner Education, Criterion III.E., “Simulation experiences may only be counted as clinical hours over and above the minimum 500 direct patient care clinical hours.”

Therefore, students should not count on-campus activities as clinical time for specialty clinical courses (NU 551, NU 652, NU 653, and NU 613). Clinical time does not include luncheons, observing hospital rounds, or seeing patients outside of the assigned patient population for the assigned course. “Direct patient care involves assessment, diagnosis, treatment, and evaluation of a real client/patient, not simulations or lab exercises with trained patient actors” (NTF Criteria, 2016).

Clinical Practice Experiences

The Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education defines clinical practice experiences “as planned learning activities in nursing practice that allow students to understand, perform, and refine professional competencies at the appropriate program level. Clinical practice experiences may be known as clinical learning opportunities, clinical practice, clinical strategies, clinical activities, experiential learning strategies, or practice” (CCNE Standards for Accreditation of Baccalaureate and Graduate Nursing Programs, 2016).

Clinical Hour Requirements for Doctor of Nursing Practice Courses

The University of Mobile School of Nursing recognizes that clinical practice requirements are essential to the education of nurses in advanced practice nursing roles. Doctor of nursing practice students are required to complete 1000 faculty/preceptor supervised clinical hours in their program of study. Students participating in the postmaster’s DNP program of study must submit a verification of clinical hours from the University in which they obtained their MSN degree. The DNP curriculum includes 540 hours, if the student has less than 460 clinical hours on admission, they will be required to take additional clinical hour course(s) to meet the 1000-hour requirement for the DNP degree. These hours count toward the 1000-hour requirement. The DNP program provides a wide variety of experiences aimed at achieving the essential and special competencies upon completion of the program. Experiences include (not limited to) indepth work with experts from nursing as well as other disciplines, literature review, research, and meetings with their preceptor and faculty chair.

Complete details regarding clinical requirements and policies can be located in the University of Mobile DNP Guidelines.

Clinical Practice Expectations for Nursing Education and Executive Leadership Programs

The student and the course faculty member are responsible for determining the work to be done to meet the course requirements. During your clinical practicum courses (NU 531, NU 534, and NU 536 Executive Leadership of Nursing Practicum or NU 541, NU 544, and NU 546 Nursing Education Practicum), the student is expected to meet the following requirements:

  • Discuss course objectives and clarify goals for clinical experience with your preceptor. Provide a written copy of approved goals and objectives to the preceptor prior to the beginning clinical hours.
  • Negotiate clinical schedule and activities, as appropriate. Students should arrive in clinical areas on the negotiated dates and times.
  • Discuss and provide preceptor with copy of the tool used to assess your clinical performance.
  • Comply with the policies of the healthcare agency and the School of Nursing, including pre-clinical compliance paperwork, training, professional attire, and identification.
  • Maintain regular contact with faculty member and inform the course faculty member promptly when problems related to the clinical experience arise.
  • Keep all scheduled appointments with preceptor and faculty.
  • Maintain a record of clinical hours.
  • Adhere to all HIPAA and HITECH guidelines of patient confidentiality.
  • Evaluate their preceptor and clinical site at the end of their clinical experience.
  • Complete 480 clinical hours for NU 531, NU 534, and NU 536 Executive Leadership Nursing Practicum and complete 480 clinical hours for NU 541, NU 544, and NU 546 Nursing Education Practicum according to the policies and guidelines as stipulated in the course syllabi.

Preceptor Responsibilities

  • Agrees to serve as student preceptor; acts as a professional role model, resource person, and mentor.
  • Completes and electronically submits preceptor planning form to course faculty one month prior to the student starting clinical hours.
  • Provides a current CV, copy of RN licensure, and transcripts.
  • Approves and agrees to jointly set goals and objectives for the student’s clinical experience, as appropriate.
  • Informs student and faculty of available learning activities and projects likely to fulfill the student’s learning objectives.
  • Encourages initiative, individuality, self-assessment, and increasing autonomy, as appropriate, by the student.
  • Shares expertise necessary to function in the clinical site.
  • Provides regular feedback to student regarding progress, strengths and limitations.
  • Completes assessment of student’s performance at mid-semester and at the end of the semester. Submits final student evaluation to faculty member within the specified course timeline.
  • Confers routinely with faculty member directly regarding student’s progress during the clinical experience. Immediately notifies the faculty member if the student’s performance is unsatisfactory.
  • Electronically submits or emails student evaluation directly to the faculty member. The student evaluation form must be on file before course completion.

Faculty Responsibilities

  • Screens, approves, and/or assigns the preceptor.
  • Assures all clinical requirements are complete prior to student beginning clinical hours.
  • Provides course information to the preceptor, to include course and/or clinical objectives, course timeline, and assessment criteria for student’s clinical performance.
  • Monitors student performance regularly and identifies progress, strengths, and limitations that may impact student’s completion of the clinical requirements.
  • Supervises all clinical learning opportunities. This can be accomplished through face-to-face meetings at the clinical site, employing the use of technology for the purpose of “visiting” the site, meeting (using various modalities) with the student and preceptor to determine how the student is progressing.
  • Contacts students as needed during the semester to discuss their clinical performance and obtainment of course objectives.
  • Contacts the preceptor (using various modalities) regarding the student’s performance a minimum of one (1) time during the semester and as needed.
  • Utilizes a variety of data, including preceptor input to assign a final course grade.

Clinical Practice Expectations for Family Nurse Practitioner Program

The student and the course faculty member are responsible for determining the work to be done to meet the course requirements. During your clinical practice (NU 551, Family Nurse Practitioner I, NU 652 Family Nurse Practitioner II, NU 653 Family Nurse Practitioner III, and NU 613 Specialty Focus Practicum), the student is expected to meet the following requirements:

Student responsibilities:

  • Discuss course objectives and clarify goals for clinical experience with your preceptor. Provide a written copy of approved goals and objectives to the preceptor prior to the beginning clinical hours.
  • Negotiate clinical schedule and activities, as appropriate. Students should arrive in clinical areas on the negotiated dates and times.
  • Clinical schedule must be entered into Typhon at least 14 days in advance.
  • Discuss and explain your preceptor will be emailed a mid-semester and end of the semester evaluation used to assess your clinical performance.
  • Comply with the policies of the healthcare agency and the School of Nursing, including pre-clinical compliance paperwork, training, professional attire, and identification.
  • Maintain regular contact with faculty member and inform the course faculty member promptly when problems related to the clinical experience arise.
  • Keep all scheduled appointments with preceptor and faculty.
  • Maintain clinical hours, clinical site, and preceptor information as indicated by the course requirements through Typhon.
  • Maintain a record of nursing through Typhon and bring all required equipment that is necessary for providing patient care (stethoscope, watch, mobile device for reference, etc.).
  • Adhere to all HIPAA and HITECH guidelines of patient confidentiality.
  • Evaluate their preceptor and clinical site at the end of their clinical experience.
  • Complete 180 clinical hours for NU 551 Family Nurse Practitioner I, complete 180 clinical hours for NU 652 Family Nurse Practitioner II, complete 180 clinical hours for NU 653, Family Nurse Practitioner III, and complete 120 clinical hours for NU 613, Specialty Focus Practicum according to the policies and guidelines as stipulated in the course syllabi and the Clinical Guidelines.
  • Student must disperse clinical hours evenly throughout the semester, students may not frontload or backload clinical hours.

Preceptor Responsibilities

  • Agrees to serve as student preceptor; acts as a professional role model, resource person, and mentor.
  • Provides a current CV and copy of licensure
  • Completes and electronically submits preceptor planning form to course faculty one month prior to the student starting clinical hours.
  • Approves and agrees to jointly set goals and objectives for the student’s clinical experience, as appropriate.
  • Informs student and faculty of available learning activities and projects likely to fulfill the student’s learning objectives.
  • Encourages initiative, individuality, self-assessment, and increasing autonomy, as appropriate, by the student.
  • Shares expertise necessary to function in the clinical site.
  • Provides regular feedback to student regarding progress, strengths and limitations.
  • Completes assessment of student’s performance at mid-semester and at the end of the semester. Submits final student evaluation to faculty member within the specified course timeline.
  • Confers routinely with faculty member directly regarding student’s progress during the clinical experience. Immediately notifies the faculty member if the student’s performance is unsatisfactory.
  • Electronically submits or emails student evaluation directly to the faculty member. The student evaluation form must be on file before course completion.
  • Submits a signed record of the student’s clinical hours.

Faculty Responsibilities

The faculty, in collaboration with the preceptor, will arrange clinical experiences to optimize the student’s personal and professional development. Specifically, the faculty will:

  1. Identify clinical educational requirements and objectives with the preceptor and student.
  2. Orient students and preceptors to the respective roles and responsibilities.
  3. Maintain periodic communication with preceptor.
  4. Communicate with the student at a minimum of once every other week to discuss progress and any problems or concerns.
  5. Address and assist in resolving problems and concerns identified by preceptors and students.
  6. Schedule a minimum of one site visit to evaluate the student’s clinical competency and attainment of the clinical learning objectives using the Clinical Evaluation Tool. If the preceptor lives within a 150-mile radius of the clinical site, a face-toface visit is required. If the preceptor lives outside of the 150-mile radius, a telephone or video conference will be accepted.
  7. Complete the following evaluations electronically in NPST/Typhon: 
    Evaluation of Student at mid-term and final 
    Evaluation of Clinical Site(s) (final)
  8. Confirm completion of Evaluations in NPST/Typhon for: 
    Preceptor’s Evaluation of Student performance (Clinical Evaluation Tool) 
    Assigned Students’ Self-Evaluation (Clinical Evaluation tool; mid- term and final)
    Assigned Students’ Evaluation of Preceptor(s)
    Assigned Students’ Evaluation of Clinical Site(s)

Clinical Site Selection Guidelines and Process for Nursing Education and Executive Leadership Programs

Clinical site selection is critical to the student’s success in the program. If the student chooses to use a clinical site with which The University has a Clinical Agency Agreement in place, the student must submit preceptor planning request forms at least 6 weeks prior to the first day of the semester during which they intend to use the preceptor. If the student chooses to use a clinical site with which The University does not have an existing Clinical Agency Agreement in place, the student must submit preceptor planning request forms at least 12 weeks prior to the first day of the semester during which they intend to use the preceptor.

Students are not permitted to select clinical practice experiences at their current place of employment. Students may not work under the direction of their supervisor or a subordinate. Approved preceptors must have no direct personal or professional relationship with the student.

If the student is employed by a large healthcare system, the clinical experiences can be completed at a separate clinical area (“the experiences must provide the opportunity for students to integrate new knowledge into practice and the experiences must be appropriate to the expected student learning and program outcomes” CCNE, Key Element II, 2016).

Clinical Site Selection Guidelines and Process for Family Nurse Practitioner Program

If the student chooses to use a clinical site with which The University has a Clinical Agency Agreement in place, the student must submit preceptor planning request forms at least 6 weeks prior to the first day of the upcoming semester during which they intend to use the preceptor. If the student chooses to use a clinical site with which The University does not have an existing Clinical Agency Agreement in place, the student must submit preceptor planning request forms at least 12 weeks prior to the first day of the semester during which they intend to use the preceptor. This time is needed to ensure that The University of Mobile School of Nursing can secure a Clinical Agency Agreement with the healthcare institution if one does not currently exist. The process can be time intensive due to each party will have an attorney review and may take several reviews before terms of the agreement are finalized.

Students are not permitted to select clinical practice experiences at their current place of employment. Students may not work under the direction of their supervisor or a subordinate. Approved preceptors must have no direct personal or professional relationship with the student.

If the student is employed by a large healthcare system, the clinical experiences can be completed at a separate clinical area (“the experiences must provide the opportunity for students to integrate new knowledge into practice and the experiences must be appropriate to the expected student learning and program outcomes” CCNE, Key Element II, 2016).

Clinical site selection is dependent upon the practicum experience for the student. Specific information related to preceptor selection will be discussed in the on-campus orientation held in the fall semester and will also be available in each clinical course syllabi. Refer to the Clinical Guidelines document for course specific requirements.

Illness or Injury at Clinical

Students who are injured or become ill while providing patient care completing clinical hours must:

  1. Notify the preceptor and course faculty member immediately.
  2. Follow the agency’s policy and procedure for injury or illness, if appropriate.

Students should refrain from reporting to the clinical area when ill, experiencing an elevated temperature, experiencing nausea/vomiting, diarrhea or any other symptom indicative of illness or disease. Students should notify the preceptor and faculty member of their clinical absence at least two (2) hours prior to their assigned clinical time.

Clinical agencies are not compelled to provide medical care free of charge for students who become ill during the clinical experience. Students are responsible for any expense(s) incurred. All students must maintain personal health care coverage.

Nurse Practitioner Competencies

Competencies are higher-level skills that represent the ability to demonstrate mastery over care management and that provide a foundation for decision-making skills under a variety of clinical situations across all care settings (See Appendices E, F, and G).

Preceptor Selection Criteria for Nursing Education and Executive Leadership Programs

The Nursing Education and Executive Leadership Programs rely on clinical preceptors for direct supervision of the practice experience. Preceptors include nurse educators and nurse administrators. These practicing professionals are the experts who guide the students in the Nursing Education and Executive Leadership Programs with day-to day experiential learning, role model the most appropriate ways to approach students in an education or administrative setting and provided feedback in a variety of clinical settings.

Serving as a clinical preceptor is an important, challenging, and rewarding activity, which requires time, attention, and consistent availability to students. Because the contribution of the preceptor faculty is so critical to the quality of the student nurse education or executive leadership learning experience, it is essential that the faculty-student-preceptor relationship be built on mutual respect, professional concurrence, and clear communication.

It is the student’s responsibility to make contact with a potential clinical agency to explore preceptorship opportunities. The Graduate Program Chair and faculty may assist in the process if the student is having difficulty securing a site. Students should start early in securing appropriate preceptors. When contacting prospective preceptors or clinical site managers, students should present themselves in a professional manner in both dress and speech.

Preceptor Selection Criteria

  1. The preceptor must have academic preparation as necessary for the position of a nurse educator or nurse administrator.
  2. The preceptor must have a minimum of one (1) year of experience in the area of clinical specialty and role.
  3. The preceptor must agree to provide opportunities, which will allow students to meet course objectives and requirements.
  4. The preceptor must state an interest in guiding the student through the practice experience.
  5. The preceptor must maintain an unencumbered registered nurse license in the state of practice.
  6. The preceptor must have permission from their employing agency to serve as a preceptor.
  7. The University of Mobile School of Nursing must have on file or secure a Clinical Agency Agreement for each clinical agency/institution for which the preceptor is employed. Preceptors are employed in clinical agencies with signed, current clinical agreements made between the administration of The University of Mobile contracting on behalf of the UM School of Nursing and the clinical agency’s board of directors or executive officer authorized to sign on behalf of the agency’s governing body. Students cannot begin clinical experiences with a healthcare agency or institution or preceptor without faculty approval and a signed contract that has been approved by The University of Mobile.

Selection Process

  1. The student submits the name of preceptor candidate to the course faculty.
  2. The prospective preceptor submits an abbreviated vita or resume for review including education, work experience, certifications, and licensure.
  3. The course faculty interviews the prospective preceptor, if indicated, and reviews their vita or resume to validate credentials to serve in the preceptor role.
  4. Upon receipt of the preceptor planning form, the course faculty and the Graduate Department Chair will evaluate the appropriateness of the clinical agency and the qualifications of the clinical preceptor.

Preceptor Responsibilities

  1. The student should send links to the Preceptor Planning form and the Graduate Preceptor Guide to their chosen preceptor.
  2. The preceptor will electronically submit the Preceptor Planning Form to the course faculty member.
    • If a clinical agency contract is needed, the preceptor submits the agency name and contact information of the person responsible for securing/updating a Clinical Agency Agreement document along with the Preceptor Planning form.
    • Students in the Nursing Education and Executive Leadership Programs are required to be supervised by a minimum of two (2) different preceptors during their program of study (i.e., students may not use the same preceptor for clinical experiences in NU 531, NU 534, NU 536, NU 541, NU 544 and NU 546).
    • Students without a preceptor in place within 30 days prior to commencement of clinical courses in NU 531, NU 534, NU 536, NU 541, NU 544 and NU 546) will be asked to withdraw from the course.
    • Students who fail to provide the appropriate information and documentation regarding their selection of preceptor within thirty (30) days and their selection of clinical site within sixty (60) days will be asked to withdraw from the course.

Preceptor Selection Criteria for Family Nurse Practitioner Program

The Family Nurse Practitioner Program relies on clinical preceptors for direct supervision of the practice experience. Preceptors include nurse practitioners and physicians. These practicing professionals are the experts who guide the students in the Family Nurse Practitioner Program with day-to-day experiential learning and provide feedback in a variety of clinical settings.

Serving as a clinical preceptor is an important, challenging, and rewarding activity, which requires time, attention, and consistent availability to students. Because the contribution of the preceptor faculty is so critical to the quality of the student nurse clinical experience, it is essential that the faculty-student-preceptor relationship be built on mutual respect, professional concurrence, and clear communication.

It is the student’s responsibility to make contact with a potential clinical agency to explore preceptorship opportunities. The Graduate Program Chair and faculty may assist in the process if the student is having difficulty securing a site. Students should start early in securing appropriate preceptors. When contacting perspective preceptors or clinical site managers, students should present themselves in a professional manner in both dress and speech.

Preceptor Selection Criteria

  1. The preceptor must have academic preparation as necessary for the position of a nurse practitioner or physician.
  2. The preceptor must be actively involved in clinical practice with a minimum of one (1) year of experience in the area of clinical specialty and role.
  3. The preceptor must agree to provide opportunities, which will allow students to meet course objectives and requirements.
  4. The preceptor must state an interest in guiding the student through the practice experience.
  5. The preceptor must have permission from their employing agency to serve as a preceptor.
  6. The preceptor must maintain an unencumbered MD, DO, or CRNP license in the state of practice. The preceptor must be able to show verification of license.
  7. The preceptor must have a nurse practitioner certification from either the American Nurses Credential Center (ANCC) or the American Association of Nurse Practitioners (AANP), WHNP for OBGYN or PNP for Pediatrics.
  8. The University of Mobile School of Nursing must have on file or secure a Clinical Agency Agreement for each clinical agency/institution for which the preceptor is employed. Preceptors must be employed in clinical agencies with signed, current clinical agreements made between the curators of The University of Mobile contracting on behalf of the School of Nursing and the clinical agency’s board of directors or executive officer authorized to sign on behalf of the agency’s governing body. Students cannot begin clinical experiences with a healthcare agency or institution or preceptor without faculty approval and a signed contract that has been approved by The University of Mobile.

Selection Process

Once you’ve identified a preceptor the student will:

  1. Complete the Preceptor Planning Form and submit it AND a copy of the preceptor’s resume or curriculum vitae, via email, to the Clinical Coordinator. *Please note that completion of the Preceptor Planning Form and other required documents is the responsibility of the student, not the student’s preceptor or agency. The student should work with the preceptor or agency to obtain the required information.
  2. Complete the Letter of Notification and Appreciation. One form must be completed for each agency the student will enter with the preceptor. The form must be signed by an office manager or other personnel responsible for allowing preceptorships to occur within the organization. 
  3. If an Affiliation Agreement is NOT established with the agency, the Course Coordinator will pursue this affiliation and update you when established.
  4. Once the above steps have been completed you will receive a Green Light email. The Green Light email will be sent to you and your clinical faculty member and will give you clearance to begin clinical once the semester begins.

The student must receive the Green Light prior to beginning clinical. Any hours accumulated prior to receipt of the Green Light will not be counted towards required clinical hours and is not legally covered by the University. Students must receive a Green Light to start clinical each semester.

  • Students may not use the same preceptor for clinical experiences in FNP courses. Students must select one (1) preceptor per clinical course. This enhances the student’s exposure to different prescriptive and diagnostic approaches. Often there are several appropriate and correct approaches to managing different patient health issues.
  • Clinical Coordinator has the authority to reject any proposed preceptor.
  • Students should select APRN certified preceptors whenever possible. National Task Force (NTF) Criterion IV.B.3 (2016) states, “The supervision of students may be shared with other clinicians serving as clinical preceptors. Programs may use a mix of clinicians to provide direct clinical teaching to students appropriate to the range of clinical experiences required to meet the program objectives. This mix of preceptors may enhance the interprofessional experience for the student…over the course of the program the student has clinical experiences with an APRN preceptor and preferably an NP with expertise in the population-focused area of practice in primary care as appropriate”
  • Students will only select one (1) clinical sites per practicum. This provides continuity with the preceptor and gives the student some variety in practice settings.
  • Students without a preceptor in place within thirty (30) days prior to commencement of clinical courses NU 551, NU 652, NU 653, and NU 613 will be asked to withdraw from the course.
  • Students who fail to provide the appropriate information and documentation regarding their selection of preceptor within the designated timeframe the student will be withdrawn from the course.
  • In the event 2 students utilize the same preceptor in the same semester, only 1 student is allowed to attend clinical at a time, 2 students may not be with the same preceptor on the same day.

Additional details on clinical paperwork and processes can be found in the Clinical Guidelines document provided to all students at orientation and made available through Canvas throughout the duration of the program.

Professional Behavior in the Clinical Setting

Students present themselves as ambassadors of The University of Mobile, the School of Nursing and the graduate program. Students are expected to be respectful to preceptors, faculty, staff, patients and their families.

Reports of unprofessional behavior will result in the student being counseled and is subject to review by the School of Nursing Dean. Examples of unprofessional behaviors include disorderly conduct, inappropriate or offensive language, damage or theft of property, disruption, discrimination, behavior or conduct adversely reflecting upon the nursing profession or the School of Nursing.

Students are permitted to have a cell phone, but they should remain in a pocket in their lab coat and on vibrate. Personal telephone calls should not be made in patient rooms or received in the presence of patients or families.

Each student is required to send their preceptor(s) a thank you note using School of Nursing letterhead (letterhead can be obtained from the School of Nursing Administrative Assistant). A copy of the letter must be sent electronically to the course faculty member and will be included with the final course evaluation.

Professional Dress in the Clinical Setting

Students are expected to comply with dress code policies established by the School of Nursing, as well as the policies of individual clinical facilities where they are assigned for clinical practice. Dress code requirements will vary among healthcare agencies.

  • Students are required to wear grey scrubs and their white lab coat with the UM logo embroidered on the front, and photo University of Mobile ID name badge. Some clinical sites may require professional attire. Professional attire includes dress pants or skirt and conservative top along with your white lab coat and UM ID badge. Shorts, jeans, open-toed shoes or low-cut shirts are not considered appropriate attire.
  • Piercings must be limited to one small earring in the lower ear lobe. For safety reasons, student must refrain from wearing hoops or dangling earrings. Earring size should not exceed 8mm.
  • Fingernails must be clean and neatly trimmed (no more than ¼ inch long).Artificial or painted nails, gel nails, acrylic nails are not allowed.
  • Visible jewelry in body piercings, including but not limited to nose, facial, or tongue studs, or multiple ear piercings including those in the upper ear and ear gauges are not permitted. No oral jewelry is allowed.
  • Hair must be neat at all times. Hair of unnatural color, as well as glitter spray, sequins and other similar artificial adornments are not permissible. Devices used to restrain hair are to be unobtrusive. Long hair should be pulled back or neatly restrained so it will not interfere with nursing activities. Trends such as multiple colors, shaved eyebrows, extremes in bleaching, dyeing or tinting, dreadlocks, mohawks, and long spiked hair (colored or natural) are not appropriate.
  • Tattoos or body art must be completely covered and appropriately concealed.
  • Jewelry. Students may wear only a watch, wedding band, and/or engagement ring. No necklaces, chokers, or bracelets are allowed.
  • Perfumes, scented lotions, aftershaves, body sprays and other scented products should not be worn.
  • Most healthcare facilities are smoke-free and tobacco free. Smoking, including the use of electronic cigarettes, is not permitted while the student is in professional dress before or during any clinical or laboratory activity.
  • No fanny packs may be worn as they may interfere with the performance of clinical duties and scarves/neckties are not permitted for student safety.
  • Personal cleanliness is a prerequisite for patient/client care. Regular bathing, hair washing and use of deodorant are part of personal cleanliness.

Students who fail to comply with the professional dress requirement will not be allowed to participate in clinical practice. Faculty members or approved preceptors will have the right to remove a student from a clinical area if, in their judgment, the student presents an unprofessional appearance or in any way is a threat to patient safety or comfort. The University of Mobile shall have no obligation to refund tuition, accommodate the student, or make any other special arrangements in the event the student is unable to meet the dress code requirements of the clinical agency.

Progression in the Clinical Setting for FNP students

Family nurse practitioner students enter as novices but move through the program quickly to develop competencies designed to establish an evidence-based practice built on a solid foundation of didactic coursework and clinical experiences focused on assisting graduates to function within the present dynamic health care environment.

In each clinical setting, the first 8 hours will primarily be observation, introducing the student to the facility and the practice requirements of the family nurse practitioner. The second clinical day, the student should begin functioning as a beginning health care provider. It is expected that the student will be performing the HPI, focused physical exams, and present cases to the preceptor. The student should progress to functioning in the provider role, which includes analyzing differential diagnoses, selecting the most likely diagnosis, and recommending an evidence-based treatment plan to the preceptor.

In general, students are expected to see one to two patients an hour. The patient population must correlate directly to the clinical course in which the student is enrolled. Students should see patients who have both acute and chronic illnesses.

Additional details on clinical experiecnes for FNP students can be found in the Clinical Guidelines.  All students are provided a copy of the Clinical Guidelines at orientation, and copies are available through Canvas throughout the duration of the program.

Section VII: Student Resources and Services

Bookstore

The campus bookstore is located in the J.L. Bedsole Library building on the first floor. Textbooks and related supplies such as University gear and snacks may be purchased in the bookstore. MasterCard and Visa are accepted for purchases. The  hours of operation are 8:30 AM - 6:00 PM, Monday through Thursday and 10:00 AM - 4:00 PM on Friday.
For more information, students should call 251.679.9293 or email mailto:umobile@bkstr.com

Campus Security

The University of Mobile maintains security guards on duty 24 hours per day. The security guard may be contacted at 251.510.4273.

Center for Excellence in Healthcare Practice

The School of Nursing maintains a nursing skills laboratory, a health assessment laboratory, and simulation center for students located on the second floor of the Weaver Hall Building. These learning resources for the School of Nursing allow students to develop knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary for applying theory to nursing practice. This learning environment serves students in the School of Nursing by providing an excellent opportunity for self-directed independent learning and the practice of basic and advanced nursing skills. The nursing lab and simulation center are equipped with newborn, infant, child, adult, and maternal mid and high-fidelity human patient simulators as well as a wide selection of task trainers. The lab is equipped with cameras and recording equipment, which can be used for real-time, shared learning and in debriefing areas. Center hours vary and are posted on the School of Nursing website. Family nurse practitioner students will learn advanced practice skills such as suturing, debridement, client assessment, etc. during on-campus intensives.

The Simulation Center contains seven simulation rooms and a control room. The simulation suite contains an adult medical-surgical simulator, a labor and delivery birthing simulator, an infant simulator, and a pediatric simulator. Other learning tools kept in the simulation rooms include a defibrillator, 12 lead EKG, crash cart, IV and feeding tube pumps, etc. Both rooms have audio-video recording capability.

Library

The J.L. Bedsole library is available for student use with a primary emphasis of establishing and maintaining library support of the academic curriculum. The library also seeks to provide instruction in research skills that serve students during their studies The University and in the career paths they choose after graduation.
Hours of Operation: 7:45 AM-10:00 PM, Monday-Thursday; 7:45 AM-4:30 PM Friday, 10:00 AM-5:00 PM Saturday, and closed Sunday. The library can be accessed through MyUM.

Parking and Traffic Regulations

Any student who operates a motorized vehicle of any type on campus must register the vehicle with the Office of Campus Operations. Students will receive a “hangtag” parking permit. Vehicles are registered online at https://www.permitsales.net/UofMobile

The University assumes no responsibility or liability for any vehicle on campus, whether or not school is in session. In the event of damage to or theft of a vehicle on the campus, if the person who caused the damage or committed the theft cannot be determine, the owner/operator of the vehicle and/or his insurance company shall be responsible for any damages or loss.

Postal Services

A contract station of the United States Post Office is located on the first floor of the Weaver Hall Building and offers all standard services. The post office is open to students from 7:30 AM until 5:30 PM Monday through Thursday.

Registrar’s Office

The Registrar’s Office is located in the Rosemary Adams building. The office is responsible for maintaining official student records and verifying that students are eligible to site for licensure examinations. Official copies of transcripts are available from this office.

Student Success Center

The Student Success Center provides academic consulting services to students enrolled at The University of Mobile. Academic consultants meet individually with students and provide assistance with developing the skills and behaviors that are essential to academic success and professional development. Services are available at no charge to the learner and may address a wide range of issues. These include transition to professional school, time management, study skills, stress management, testing strategies, interpersonal and communication skills, clarifying career goals, and coping strategies. Professional counseling is also available to students through the Student Success Center located in the Rosemary Adams Building. More specific contact information is located on The University webpage under the quick link, Student Life.

Chora Godwin Learning & Writing Center (LWC)

The University of Mobile Learning Center helps students develop effective strategies related to studying, note taking, test taking, and more. Meet with a study-strategies group, make a one-on-one appointment with an LWC Tutor, or check out an upcoming Success Series session. Free peer tutoring is held in the Chora Godwin Learning & Writing Center Fall and Spring semesters. Tutoring services are offered the second week of classes and continue while classes are in session, see tutoring services at MYUM LINK.

UptoDate

Students are given free access to UptoDate. UpToDate is the only resource associated with improved patient outcomes and hospital performance, and studies show that clinicians who use UpToDate change their decisions 30 percent of the time. More than 6,900 world-renowned physician authors, editors, and reviewers use a rigorous editorial process to synthesize the most recent medical information into trusted, evidence-based recommendations. Every day, clinicians view topics covering 25 specialties over 1.5 million times.

Section VIII: Student Responsibilities

Ethical Practice

The University of Mobile graduate nursing program supports the American Nurses Association Code (ANA) of Ethics for Professional Nurses. All students must abide by the ANA Code of Ethics during their clinical performance. The philosophical basis for safe practice by faculty and students is described in the ANA Code of Ethics (2016).

Provision 1. The nurse practices with compassion and respect for inherent dignity, worth and unique attributes of every person.
Provision 2. The nurse’s primary commitment is to the patient, whether an individual, family group, community or population.
Provision 3. The nurse promotes, advocates for, and protects the rights, health, and safety of the patient.
Provision 4. The nurse has authority, accountability, and responsibility for nursing practice, makes decisions; and takes action consistent with the obligation to promote health and to provide optimal care.
Provision 5. The nurse owes the same duties to self as to others, including the responsibility to promote health and safety, preserve wholeness of character and integrity, maintain competence, and continue personal and professional growth.
Provision 6. The nurse, through individual and collective effort, establishes, maintains , and improves the ethical environment of the work settings and conditions of employment that are conducive to safe, quality health care.
Provision 7. The nurse, in all roles and settings, advances the profession through research and scholarly inquiry, professional standards development, and the generation of both nursing and health policy.
Provision 8. The nurse collaborates with other health professionals and the public to protect human rights, promote health diplomacy, and reduce health disparities.
Provision 9. The profession of nursing, collectively through its professional organizations, must articulate nursing values, maintain the integrity of the profession, and integrate principles of social justice into nursing and health policy.

Liability Insurance

All graduate students enrolled in clinical and practicum courses participate in The University of Mobile Nursing Student Liability Insurance Program. There are no additional fees related to this liability coverage.

Licensure

The School of Nursing requires that graduate students demonstrate a level of competence commensurate with the educational and experiential prerequisites for admission and progression in the program. Graduate students are required to maintain licensure as a registered nurse in their state of residence to practice nursing as a registered nurse throughout their educational program at The University of Mobile. Additionally, students must hold licensure as a registered nurse in any state where the practice/practicum requirements are completed. The student is required to provide verification of licensure from the appropriate state board.

The University of Mobile’s residential campus is located in the state of Alabama; therefore, our students and faculty must abide by the regulations of the Alabama Board of Nursing. Nursing courses with a clinical component may not be taken by any individual who has been denied licensure by the Alabama Board of Nursing; or whose license is currently suspended, surrendered or revoked in any United States jurisdiction; or whose license is currently suspended, surrendered, or revoked in another country due to any disciplinary action.

Safe Clinical Practice

The faculty and staff of the School of Nursing support The University of Mobile Preamble, Mission Statement, Vision Statement, Biblical Worldview, and Statement of Christian Affirmation. The faculty and administration have the expectation that learning, faith, and leadership will be reflected in the interactions and actions of all individuals involved with the activities of the School of Nursing. The intent of The University is reflected in the phrase, “Changing Lives to Change the World” and is evident in the core values of being Christ-centered, Academically-focused, Student-devoted, and Distinctively-driven. It is expected in clinical practice that these attributes be evident.

Safety in nursing practice and research is required of all professional nurses and all students of professional nursing. In order to ensure safe practices students are expected to:

  • Assume responsibility for their own actions.
  • Demonstrate self-discipline in meeting commitments and obligations, submitting written assignments on time, keeping appointments, etc.
  • Preparing in advance for clinical or practicum experiences.
  • Function within the guidelines and policies of the institution, in which they are practicing, and within their scope of practice and according to all legal parameters.
  • Communicate appropriately, accurately, and truthfully.
  • Recognize own limitations and the need for appropriate supervision.
  • Provide competent care for all individuals regardless of age, sex, race, or diagnosis.
  • Obtain preceptor signature on all patient documentation, including charting and prescriptions.
  • Notify the Graduate Program Chair and/or Dean immediately of any change in licensure status, i.e. probation, suspension, or revocation.

The following situations are considered unsafe and are absolute grounds for course failure and may result in dismissal from the program:

  • Preceptor or healthcare agency/institution refusal to continue working with the student due to clinical safety issues.
  • Student is under the influence of alcohol, recreational drugs, or medications that impair judgment in the clinical, classroom, and/or research setting.
  • Positive drug test for non-prescribed or illegal drugs; or refusal of drug testing.
  • Abuse or inappropriate behavior, including but not limited to intimidation, threats or acts of violence to patients, staff, faculty, or other students.
  • Fraudulent or dishonest behavior.
  • Behavior or judgment that compromises the safety of a patient.
  • Other unsafe clinical practice as deemed by faculty.
  • Violation of rules of professional conduct established by accrediting or licensing bodies.
  • Any act or behavior, which violates the objectives and/or policies of the School of Nursing; Clinical Agency, the Alabama Board of Nursing Nurse Practice Act, or the Board of Nursing Nurse Practice Act in the state where the student maintains licensure.

Student Conduct

As practicing professionals, students are responsible participants in their educational experiences at The University of Mobile. Students are expected to display professionalism, respect, kindness in all aspects of their work and study. This includes, but is not limited to, email conversations, discussion board posts, phone calls and face-to-face encounters with fellow students, faculty, staff, preceptors, clinical agencies, and patients. Incidences of student incivility will be reported to the Graduate Program Chair and the Graduate Faculty Committee for appropriate action. Students will be given a written warning and may face dismissal if episodes of incivility or inappropriate behavior continue.

Section IX: Appendices

Appendix B-Essential Core Performance Standards

Core Performance: Cognitive Skills

The student must demonstrate the ability to:

  1. Learn, integrate and analyze large volumes of complex, technically detailed information to perform clinical problem solving. Synthesize and apply concepts and information in formulating diagnostic and therapeutic judgments.
  2. Learn and perform common diagnostic procedures (laboratory, cardiographic, radiologic, and to interpret the results, recognizing deviations from the norm and identifying pathophysiologic processes).
  3. Evaluate patient status and make responsible decisions regarding appropriate courses of action/treatment within given time constraints.
  4. Effectively synthesize data from the patient, medical records, verbal reports, medical history and observation for the purpose of recommending or maintaining treatment.
  5. Differential multiple patient situations simultaneously.
  6. Apply critical reasoning and independent decision making skills.
  7. Apply quantitative methods of measurement, including calculation, reasoning, analysis, and synthesis.

Core Performance: Psychomotor Skills

The student must demonstrate the ability to:

  1. Sitting: Maintain upright posture
  2. Standing: Maintain upright posture
  3. Locomotion: Ability to physically maneuver in required clinical settings and accomplished assigned tasks.
  4. Manual tasks:
    1. Maneuver or move an individual’s body parts or clinical equipment effectively to perform evaluation and treatment techniques, including palpation, percussion, auscultation, and other diagnostic maneuvers.
    2. Competently perform basic cardiac life support (BCLS) using guidelines from the American Heart Association.
    3. Pushing/pulling ability to exert force against a small or large object to move it closer or further away.
    4. Coordination of both gross and fine motor movements, equilibrium, and a function use of special senses sufficient to provide general care and emergency treatment of patients (the opening of obstructed airways, the suturing of wounds, and performing simple obstetrical maneuvers).
    5. Apply adequate pressure to arrest bleeding.
  5. Small motor/hand skills:
    1. Legibly record/document history and physical examinations, consultations, etc., in standard/electronic charts in hospital/clinical settings in a timely manner and consistent with the acceptable normal of clinical settings.
    2. Apply a firm grasp.
    3. Operate a push button telephone.
    4. Perform precision movements (venipuncture, catheterization, IV regulation, dressing changes, etc.), which may further include invasive procedures into the central circulation or highly specific body cavity/spaces.
    5. Sense through palpation changes in an individual’s muscle tone, soft tissues, skin quality, and temperature and sense responses to environmental changes and treatment.
    6. Manipulate a blood pressure cuff, stethoscope, thermometer; insert catheters, IV’s, NG tubes; perform injections and manipulate equipment as required.
    7. Carry out basic laboratory tests.
    8. Carry out diagnostic therapeutic procedures (phlebotomy, venipuncture, placement of catheters and tubes).
  6. Visual acuity to:
    1. Legibly record/document history and physical examinations, consultations, etc., in standard/electronic charts in hospital/clinical settings in a timely manner and consistent with the acceptable normal of clinical settings.
    2. Perform precision movements.
    3. Identify tiny markings and inscriptions (i.e., on syringes, thermometers, IV bags, etc.).
    4. Identify color changes and coding.
    5. Read ECGs and X-rays.
  7. Hearing or ability to receive:
    1. Effectively respond to verbal requests from patients and team members.
    2. Interpret the language used to communicate lectures, instructions, concepts, narratives, questions, and answers.
    3. Auscultate and percuss for internal body sounds, e.g. heart sounds, bowel sounds, lung sounds.
  8. Communication Ability:
    1. Effectively and sensitively communicate to other students, teachers, patients, peers, and other support staff to ask questions, explain conditions and procedures, and teach programs in a timely manner and within the acceptable normal of academic and clinical settings.
    2. Receive and interpret written information in both academic and clinical settings in a timely manner. Communication in oral and written form with health care team must be effective and efficient.
    3. Should be able to speak, to hear, and to observe patients in order to elicit information, perceive non-verbal communication, and describe changes in mood, activity, and physical presence.
  9. Self-Care: Maintain general good health and self-care in order to not jeopardize the health and safety of self and individuals with whom one interacts in the academic and clinical settings.

Core Performance: Affective Skills

  1. Function effectively with good judgment under stressful and demanding clinical situations.
  2. Adapt to changing and chaotic environments.
  3. Possess and maintain the emotional health required for the full utilization of his intellectual abilities, the exercise of good judgment, the prompt completion of all responsibilities attendant to the diagnosis and care of patients, and the development of mature, sensitive and effective relationships with patients.
  4. Tolerate physically and intellectually demanding workloads (averaging 50-60 hours/week).
  5. Adapt to constantly changing environments, display flexibility, and learn to function in the face of uncertainty or ambiguity.
  6. Demonstrate the personal qualities of compassion, integrity, concern for others, self-discipline, focus, and self-motivation.
  7. Exhibit emotional stability that enables full utilization of abilities to engage in safe care to patients.
  8. Demonstrates compassion, integrity, concern for others and effective interpersonal skills.

Appendix E-NONPF Nurse Practitioner Competencies

National Organization for Nurse Practitioner Faculties (NONPF)
Nurse Practitioner Competencies (2017)

Source: http://www.nonpf.org

At the completion of the FNP program, the graduate should demonstrate competency in the nine (9) core competencies.

Scientific Foundation Competencies

  1. Critically analyzes data and evidence for improving advanced nursing practice.
  2. Integrates knowledge from the humanities and sciences within the context of nursing science.
  3. Translates research and other forms of knowledge to improve practice processes and outcomes.
  4. Develops new practice approaches based on the integration of research, theory, and practice knowledge.

Leadership Competencies

  1. Assumes complex and advanced leadership roles to initiate and guide change.
  2. Provides leadership to foster collaboration with multiple stakeholders (e.g. patients, community, integrated health care teams, and policy makers) to improve health care.
  3. Demonstrates leadership that uses critical and reflective thinking.
  4. Advocates for improved access, quality, and cost-effective health care.
  5. Advances practice through the development and implementation of innovations incorporating principles of change.
  6. Communicates practice knowledge effectively, both orally and in writing.
  7. Participates in professional organizations and activities that influence advanced practice nursing and/or health outcomes of a population focus.

Quality Competencies

  1. Uses best available evidence to continuously improve quality of clinical practice.
  2. Evaluates the relationships among access, cost, quality and safety, and their influence on health care.
  3. Evaluates how organizational structure, care processes, financing, marketing, and policy decisions impact the quality of health care.
  4. Applies skills in peer review to promote a culture of excellence.
  5. Anticipates variations in practice and is proactive in implementing interventions to ensure quality.

Practice Inquiry Competencies

  1. Provides leadership in the translation of new knowledge into practice.
  2. Generates knowledge from clinical practice to improve practice and patient outcomes.
  3. Applies clinical investigative skills to improve health outcomes.
  4. Leads practice inquiry, individually and in partnership with others.
  5. Disseminates evidence from inquiry to diverse audiences using multiple modalities.
  6. Analyzes clinical guidelines for individualized application into practice.

Technology and Information Literacy Competencies

  1. Integrates appropriate technologies for knowledge management to improve health care.
  2. Translates technical and scientific health information appropriate for various user’s needs.
    1. Assesses the patient’s and caregiver’s educational needs to provide effective, personalized health care.
    2. Coaches the patient and caregiver for positive behavioral change.
  3. Demonstrates information literacy skills in complex decision-making.
  4. Contributes to the design of clinical information systems that promote safe, quality, and cost-effective care.
  5. Uses technology systems that capture data on variables for the evaluation of nursing care.

Policy Competencies

  1. Demonstrates an understanding of interdependence of policy and practice.
  2. Advocates for ethical policies that promote access, equity, quality, and cost.
  3. Analyzes ethical, legal, and social factors influencing policy development.
  4. Contributes in the development of health policy.
  5. Analyzes the implications of health policy across the disciplines.
  6. Evaluates the impact of globalization on health care policy development.
  7. Advocates for policies for safe and healthy practice environments.

Health Delivery System Competencies

  1. Applies knowledge of organizational practices and complex systems to improve health care delivery.
  2. Effects health care change using broad based skills including negotiating, consensus-building and partnering.
  3. Minimizes risk to patients and providers at the individual and systems level.
  4. Facilitates the development of health care systems that address the needs of culturally diverse populations, providers, and other stakeholders.
  5. Evaluates the impact of health care delivery on patients, providers, other stakeholders, and the environment.
  6. Analyzes organizational structure, functions, and resources to improve the delivery of care.
  7. Collaborates in planning for transitions across the continuum of care.

Ethics Competencies

  1. Integrates ethical principles in decision making.
  2. Evaluates the ethical consequences of decisions.
  3. Applies ethically sound solutions to complex issues related to individuals, populations, and systems of care.

Independent Practice Competencies

  1. Functions as a licensed independent practitioner.
  2. Demonstrates the highest level of accountability for professional practice.
  3. Practices independently managing previously diagnosed and undiagnosed patients.
    1. Provides the full spectrum of health care services to include health promotion, disease prevention, health protection, anticipatory guidance, counseling, disease management, palliative, and end-of-life care.
    2. Uses advanced health assessment skills to differentiate between normal, variations of normal and abnormal findings.
    3. Employs screening and diagnostic strategies in the development of diagnoses.
    4. Prescribes medications within the scope of practice.
    5. Manages the health/illness status of patients and families over time.
  4. Provides patient-centered care recognizing cultural diversity and the patient or designee as a full partner in decision making.
    1. Works to establish a relationship with the patient characterized by mutual respect, empathy, and collaboration.
    2. Creates a climate of patient-centered care to include confidentiality, privacy, comfort, emotional support, mutual trust, and respect.
    3. Incorporates the patient’s cultural and spiritual preferences, values, and beliefs into health care.
    4. Preserves the patient’s control over decision making by negotiating a mutually acceptable plan of care.
    5. Develops strategies to prevent one’s own personal biases from interfering with delivery of quality care.
    6. Addresses cultural, spiritual, and ethnic influences that potentially create conflict among individuals, families, staff, and caregivers.
  5. Educates professional and lay caregivers to provide culturally and spiritual sensitive, appropriate care.
  6. Collaborates with both professional and other caregivers to achieve optimal care outcomes.
  7. Coordinates transitional care services in and across care settings.
  8. Participates in the development, use, and evaluation of professional standards and evidence-based care.

Appendix F-Family Nurse Practitioner Competencies

Family Nurse Practitioner Competencies

These are entry-level competencies for the family nurse practitioner that supplement the core competencies for all nurse practitioners. The population in primary care family practice includes newborns, infants, children, adolescents, adults, pregnant and postpartum women, and older adults. The focus of care is the family unit, as well as the individuals belonging to the family. Family nurse practitioners demonstrate a commitment to family-centered care and practice primarily in ambulatory care settings.

Upon graduation or entry into practice, the family nurse practitioner should demonstrate competence in the categories described below:

I. Health Promotion, Helath Protection, Disease prevention, and Treatment

  1. A. Assessment of Health Status

    ​These competencies describe the role of the family nurse practitioner in assessing all aspects of the patient’s health status, including for purposes of health promotion, health protection, and disease prevention. The family nurse practitioner employs evidence-based clinical practice guidelines to guide screening activities, identifies health promotion needs, and provides anticipatory guidance and counseling addressing environmental, lifestyle, and developmental issues.
    1. Obtains and accurately documents in a relevant health history for patients of all ages and in all phases of the individual and family life cycle.
    2. Assesses (a) the influence of the family or psychosocial factors on patient illness, (b) conditions related to developmental delays and learning disabilities in all ages, (c) women’s and men’s reproductive health, including, but not limited to, sexual health, pregnancy, and postpartum care, and (d) problems of substance abuse and violence.
    3. Performs and accurately documents appropriate comprehensive or symptom-focused physical examinations on patients of all ages (including developmental and behavioral screening and physical system evaluations).
    4. Performs screening evaluations for mental status and mental health.
    5. Identifies health and psychosocial risk factors of patients of all ages and families in all stages of family life cycle.
    6. Demonstrates proficiency in family assessment.
    7. Demonstrates proficiency in functional assessment of family members (e.g. elderly, disabled).
    8. Assesses specific family health needs within the context of community assessment.
    9. Identifies and plans interventions to promote health with families at risk.
    10. Assesses the impact of an acute and/or chronic illness or common injuries on the family as a whole.
    11. Distinguishes between normal and abnormal change with aging.
  2. Diagnosis of Health Status
     
    ​The family nurse practitioner is engaged in the diagnosis of health status. This diagnostic process includes critical thinking, differential diagnosis, and the integration and interpretation of various forms of data. These competencies describe this role of the family nurse practitioner.
    1. Identifies signs and symptoms of acute physical and mental illnesses across the life span.
    2. Identifies signs and symptoms of chronic physical and mental illness across the life span.
    3. Orders, performs, and interprets age, gender, and condition-specific diagnostic tests and screening procedures.
    4. Analyzes and synthesizes collected data for patients of all ages.
    5. Formulates comprehensive differential diagnoses, considering epidemiology, environmental and community characteristics, and life stage development, including the presentation seen with increasing age, family, and behavioral risk factors.
  3. Plan of Care and Implementation of Treatment

    The objectives of planning and implementing therapeutic interventions are to return the patient to a stable state and to optimize the patient’s health. These competencies describe the family nurse practitioner’s role in stabilizing the patient, minimizing physical and psychological complications, and maximizing the patient’s health potential.
    1. Provides health protection, health promotion, and disease prevention interventions/treatment strategies to improve or maintain optimum health for all family members.
    2. Treats common acute and chronic physical and mental illnesses and common injuries in people of all ages to minimize the development of complications, and promote function and quality of living.
    3. Prescribes medications with knowledge of altered pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics with special populations such as infants and children, pregnant and lactating women, and older adults.
    4. Adapts care to meet the complex needs of older adults arising from age changes and multiple system disease.
    5. Identifies acute exacerbations of chronic illness and intervenes appropriately.
    6. Evaluates the effectiveness of the plan of care for the family, as well as the individual, and implements changes.
    7. Evaluates patient’s and/or other caregiver’s support systems and resources and collaborates with and supports the patient and caregivers.
    8. Assists families and individuals in the development of coping systems and lifestyle adaptations.
    9. Makes appropriate referrals to other health care professionals and community resources for individuals and families.
    10. Provides care related to women’s reproductive health, including sexual health, prenatal, and postpartum care.
    11. Assesses and promotes self-care in patients with disabilities.
    12. Performs primary care procedures, including, but not limited to, suturing, minor lesion removal, splinting, microscopy, and pap tests.
    13. Recognizes the impact of individual and family life transitions, such as parenthood and retirement, on the health of family members.
    14. Uses knowledge of family theories and development to individualize care provided to individuals and families.
    15. Facilitates transitions between health care settings to provide continuity of care for individuals and families.
    16. Intervenes with multigenerational families who have members with differing health concerns.
    17. Assists patient and family members to cope with end of life issues.
    18. Applies research that is family-centered and contributes to positive change in the health of and health care delivery to families.

II. Nurse Practitioner-Patient Relationship

Competencies in this area demonstrate the personal, collegial, and collaborative approach, which enhances the family nurse practitioner’s effectiveness of patient care. The competencies speak to the critical importance of interpersonal transactions as they relate to therapeutic patient outcomes.

  1. Maintains a sustaining partnership with individuals and families.
  2. Assists individuals and families with ethical issues in balancing differing needs, age-related transitions, illness, or health among family members.
  3. Facilitates family decision-making about health.

III. Teaching-Coaching Function

These competencies describe how the family nurse practitioner’s ability to impart knowledge and associated psycho-motor skills to patients. The coaching function involves the skills of interpreting and individualizing therapies through the activities of advocacy, modeling, and tutoring.

  1. Demonstrates knowledge and skill in addressing sensitive topics with family members such as sexuality, finances, mental health, terminal illness, and substance abuse.
  2. Elicits information about the family’s and patient’s goals, perceptions, and resources when considering health care choices.
  3. Assesses educational needs and teaches individuals and families accordingly.
  4. Provides anticipatory guidance, teaching, counseling, and education for self-care for the identified patient and family.

IV. Professional Role

These competencies describe the varied role of the family nurse practitioner, specifically related to advancing the profession and enhancing direct care and management. The family nurse practitioner demonstrates a commitment to the implementation, preservation, and evolution of the family nurse practitioner role. As well, the family nurse practitioner implements critical thinking and builds collaborative, interdisciplinary relationships to provide optimal care to the patient.

  1. Demonstrates in practice a commitment to the care of the whole family.
  2. Recognizes the importance of participating in community and professional organizations that influence the health of families and supports the role of the family nurse practitioner.
  3. Interprets the family nurse practitioner role in primary and specialty health care to other health care providers and the public.
  4. Serves as a resource in the design and development of family community-based health services.

V. Managing and Negotiating Health Care Delivery Systems

These competencies describe the family nurse practitioner’s role in handling situations successfully to achieve improved health outcomes for the patient, communities, and systems through overseeing and directing the delivery of clinical services within an integrated system of health care.

  1. Maintains current knowledge regarding state and federal regulations and programs for family health care.

VI. Monitoring and Ensuring the Quality of Health Care Practice

These competencies describe the family nurse practitioner’s role in ensuring quality of care through consultation, collaboration, continuing education, certification, and evaluation. The monitoring function of the role is also addressed relative to monitoring one’s own practice as well as engaging in interdisciplinary peer and systems review.

VII. Cultural Competence

These competencies describe the family nurse practitioner’s role in providing culturally competent care, delivering patient care with respect to cultural and spiritual beliefs, and making health care resources available to patients from diverse cultures.

Appendix G-MSN Level Competencies

MSN LEVEL COMPETENCIES
Source: http://aacn.nche.edu

Expected outcomes for core courses were derived from the Essential of Master’s Education for Advanced Practice Nursing (AACN, 2011). Outcomes for the nursing education major were derived from the Nurse Educator Competencies by the Southern Regional Educational Board.

MSN Level Competencies for the Master of Science in Nursing Education and Executive Leadership

Core Competencies (All students)
Following the completion of NU 500, NU 503, NU 506, NU 524, NU 525, NU 528, and NU 619:

  1. Effectively utilize research in the practice or educational setting.
  2. Demonstrate an understanding of health care policy, organization and financing of health care.
  3. Describe a process for making ethical decisions.
  4. Provide an inclusive definition of advanced practice nursing roles.
  5. Critique, analyze, and evaluate a variety of nursing theories.
  6. Develop an understanding of the wide diversity of subcultural influences on human behavior.
  7. Foster principles of health promotion, illness prevention, and maintenance of function across the health-illness continuum.

Nursing Education Core Curriculum
Following the completion of NU 502, NU 504, NU 515, NU 517, and NU 540:

  1. Develop curricula based on the mission, philosophy, and framework of the program and the institution.
  2. Define goals and objectives.
  3. Plan instructional objectives and content consistent with overall curricular goals.
  4. Organize content and learning experiences according to principles of learning.
  5. Design instructional strategies to achieve learning goals.
  6. Evaluate learning and achieving of goals.
  7. Construct tests to measure learning.
  8. Incorporate technology into curricula.
  9. Use current research findings and scholarly works in nursing to improve education.

Nursing Education Practicum Experience
Following the completion of NU 541, NU 544 and NU 545 the student will:

  1. Use appropriate theoretical frameworks and learning principles to socialize students into the role of professional nursing.
  2. Help learners use education resources effectively.
  3. Provide clinical supervision for learners.
  4. Select, plan, implement, and evaluate learning experiences.
  5. Promote nursing scholarship in academic and practice settings.
  6. Communicate effectively with peers, students, administrators, and others to facilitate improvements in nursing education.
  7. Demonstrate professional and educational values.
  8. Effectively apply teaching strategies in the classroom learning setting.

Executive Leadership Core Curriculum
Following the completion of NU 505, NU 530, AC 544, BA 524, BA 519, and BA 597 the student will:

  1. Develop effective oral and written communication skills.
  2. Exhibit knowledge of the health care environment in a variety of areas.
  3. Utilize principles of leadership in managing personnel.
  4. Promote an environment of professionalism.
  5. Develop a repertoire of business skills related to health economics and financial management.
  6. Incorporate the use of information technology for data entry to improve nursing practice.
  7. Develop motivation methods to influence the behavior of others.
  8. Utilize management principles to develop strategic plans.
  9. Use recent research findings and scholarly works in nursing to improve health care management.

Executive Leadership Practicum Experience
Following completion of NU 531, NU 534 and NU 536 the student will:

  1. Use appropriate theoretical frameworks and learning principles to socialize student into the role of nursing administration.
  2. Build a collaborative relationship with others in the health care delivery system.
  3. Engage staff and others in shared governance related to decision making.
  4. Develop goals for quality improvement in the health care organization.
  5. Promote nursing scholarship in the practice setting.
  6. Formulate strategies for problem solving and conflict management in the health care organization.
  7. Demonstrate professional and ethical values.
  8. Effectively apply administrative leadership strategies in the health care setting.
  9. Participate and analyze financial management plans of health care organization.